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10 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-1973
Scope Note
Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
History
The store was operated by Ben Zion Hyman and his wife Fanny. Their hours were 8:30 a.m. to 1pm daily (except for Saturday). There was a mimeograph machine, pop cooler, newspapers and a bar mitzvah registry. They carried Yiddish and Hebrew books, Judaica, tickets for the Standard Theatre, stationary, and school supplies. The store later moved to 412 Spadina Ave. (Donegan, Spadina Ave., p.138)
Category
Education
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
525 Dundas Street West
Source
Landmarks

Henry (Harry) Dworkin, husband of Dorothy (Goldstick) Dworkin, was born in 1886 in Russia and came to Canada in 1905. In the early years, Henry dispersed food to the hungry and helped people from Poland, Rumania, and Latvia after they settled in Canada. Henry opened E. & H. Dworkin Steamship and Bankers in 1917 with his brother Edward. The business continued as Dworkin Travel at 525 Dundas Street West. Dworkin Travel was the oldest travel agency in Toronto which also carried a wholesale tobacco business at the rear.
Address
525 Dundas Street West
Time Period
1917-1930s
Scope Note
Henry (Harry) Dworkin, husband of Dorothy (Goldstick) Dworkin, was born in 1886 in Russia and came to Canada in 1905. In the early years, Henry dispersed food to the hungry and helped people from Poland, Rumania, and Latvia after they settled in Canada. Henry opened E. & H. Dworkin Steamship and Bankers in 1917 with his brother Edward. The business continued as Dworkin Travel at 525 Dundas Street West. Dworkin Travel was the oldest travel agency in Toronto which also carried a wholesale tobacco business at the rear.
History
Henry was also the founder of the Labour Lyceum. Henry and Dorothy had one daughter, Ellen, whose nickname was Honey. He died in an auto accident in 1928 and 20,000 people attended the funeral.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
305 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Standard Barber Shop was owned by Benjamin and Gittel (nee Stillman) Barsh. Benjamin Barsh was also the music director for the Standard Theatre and played viola with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Address
305 Spadina Avenue
Scope Note
The Standard Barber Shop was owned by Benjamin and Gittel (nee Stillman) Barsh. Benjamin Barsh was also the music director for the Standard Theatre and played viola with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
345 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
345 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1934-2009
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
374 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Gordon Melamed (6 Apr. 1927-16 Nov. 2004) was born to Morris and Zena Melamed. The Melamed family was originally from Russia. Morris Melamed served in the Russian army during the Russo-Japanese War. He was married to Zena Melamed and they had eleven children, Gordon being the only boy. Morris Melamed owned a dry goods store and the family were active members of the Toronto Jewish community.
Address
374 Spadina Avenue
Scope Note
Gordon Melamed (6 Apr. 1927-16 Nov. 2004) was born to Morris and Zena Melamed. The Melamed family was originally from Russia. Morris Melamed served in the Russian army during the Russo-Japanese War. He was married to Zena Melamed and they had eleven children, Gordon being the only boy. Morris Melamed owned a dry goods store and the family were active members of the Toronto Jewish community.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
400 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
400 Spadina Avenue
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
376 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Leon Koffler was born in Romania. He moved to Canada and settled in the Toronto area at the age of fifteen with his mother and his three sisters. He graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1921, and two years later, opened his first pharmacy at 376 College Street. Leon lived in the apartment above his store with his wife Tiana [née. Reinhorn] and their son Murray.
Address
376 College Street
Time Period
1923
Scope Note
Leon Koffler was born in Romania. He moved to Canada and settled in the Toronto area at the age of fifteen with his mother and his three sisters. He graduated from the Ontario College of Pharmacy in 1921, and two years later, opened his first pharmacy at 376 College Street. Leon lived in the apartment above his store with his wife Tiana [née. Reinhorn] and their son Murray.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
494 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks
Address
494 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1948
History
In 1952, Edell married Dolly Weinstock, the daughter of Moishe and Sylvia Weinstock. They lived in the newly developed suburb of North York with their four children: Ethel, Simcha, Malka and Joseph. After 10 years of marriage, Dolly died and in 1966, he married Celia Rogen Hoffman.
Sol Edell was a founding member and first president of the Clanton Park Congregation. He was actively involved in the construction of the synagogue and its development. He continued to be affiliated with Shomrai Shabbos where his grandfather Rabbi Yosef Weinreb had been the rabbi. He was also involved with Adas Israel, the synagogue in Hamilton where his wife Celia had been an active member. He was chair of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region -- Toronto Jewish Congress Archives Committee, which subsequently became the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Category
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
665 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
Address
665 College Street
Scope Note
Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
From 1933 to 1942, Weingluck lived in France and, during the Nazi occupation of France, was imprisoned in eight concentration camps from 1942 to 1945. The Nazis made use of his artistic talent as a barracks designer and portraitist. During this time, the Germans confiscated 375 of his paintings.
After the war, Weingluck moved to Tangiers, Morocco, and then immigrated to Canada to join his brother in Toronto. Henry opened H. W. Art Gallery, at 665 College Street, around 1948, and then Weingluck's Art Gallery and Gift Shoppe at 623 College Street, in the 1950s. In 1950, he married his wife Rae (née Simon), whom he met in Canada. Henry died in Toronto in 1987.
Category
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Source
Landmarks

Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
Address
Dundas and Elizabeth Streets
Time Period
ca. 1921-present
Scope Note
Dr. Max Kates was a Jewish dentist in Toronto. He was married to Lillian Kates, who was the founder of Camp Arowhon, a popular Jewish summer camp in Algonquin Park.
History
This building was designed by Benjamin Brown and was commissioned by Dr. Kates to house several stores and offices. It still stands today at the corner of Dundas and Elizabeth Streets in the heart of Toronto’s former St. John’s Ward; the area that first received the thousands of Jewish immigrants fleeing the pogroms in Russia and Eastern Europe.
Category
Architecture
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
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