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5 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
Address
371 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1925-1973
Scope Note
Hyman's Books and Art was a popular locale for the literary crowd. Hebraists were known to spend time here, discussing the latest trends in the world of literature. The owner Ben Zimon Hyman was also a Hebrew teacher but had originally trained as an engineer both in Russia and at the University of Toronto.
History
The store was operated by Ben Zion Hyman and his wife Fanny. Their hours were 8:30 a.m. to 1pm daily (except for Saturday). There was a mimeograph machine, pop cooler, newspapers and a bar mitzvah registry. They carried Yiddish and Hebrew books, Judaica, tickets for the Standard Theatre, stationary, and school supplies. The store later moved to 412 Spadina Ave. (Donegan, Spadina Ave., p.138)
Category
Education
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
542 Dundas Street West
Source
Landmarks

This newspaper covered events in the Jewish world in Toronto and abroad. The paper was also a forum for Yiddish essayists. The long-time editor of the newpspaper was Abraham Rhinewine (1887-1932). Born in Poland in 1887, he immigrated to London, England in 1902 and then came to Toronto with his wife Amy in 1907.
Address
542 Dundas Street West
Time Period
1910-1975
Scope Note
This newspaper covered events in the Jewish world in Toronto and abroad. The paper was also a forum for Yiddish essayists. The long-time editor of the newpspaper was Abraham Rhinewine (1887-1932). Born in Poland in 1887, he immigrated to London, England in 1902 and then came to Toronto with his wife Amy in 1907.
History
The OJA has the Yiddisher Zhurnal on microfiche from 1915-1959. The newspaper eventually moved to 409 College Street West (at Lippincott).
Category
Political
Education
Arts
Source
Landmarks
Address
665 College Street
Source
Landmarks

Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
Address
665 College Street
Scope Note
Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
From 1933 to 1942, Weingluck lived in France and, during the Nazi occupation of France, was imprisoned in eight concentration camps from 1942 to 1945. The Nazis made use of his artistic talent as a barracks designer and portraitist. During this time, the Germans confiscated 375 of his paintings.
After the war, Weingluck moved to Tangiers, Morocco, and then immigrated to Canada to join his brother in Toronto. Henry opened H. W. Art Gallery, at 665 College Street, around 1948, and then Weingluck's Art Gallery and Gift Shoppe at 623 College Street, in the 1950s. In 1950, he married his wife Rae (née Simon), whom he met in Canada. Henry died in Toronto in 1987.
Category
Arts
Retail store
Source
Landmarks
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
Address
15 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1937
Scope Note
At the turn of the twentieth-century, the Jewish population of Toronto grew with large numbers of Eastern European families fleeing hardship back home. Soon, a variety of clubs began forming, providing a place for Jewish boys and girls to participate in athletic and social programming. In 1919, several of the athletic and social groups decided to amalgamate and formed an umbrella organization known as the Hebrew Association of Young Men’s and Young Women’s Clubs. By 1930, they were known as the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A (Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association. Through the 1920s and 30s, they occupied a number of facilities in the Brunswick Avenue and College Street area.
History
As a result of the overcrowding and de-centralized facilities, in 1937, the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. constructed its own athletic building at 15 Brunswick Avenue, next door to the Talmud Torah, to ease the overcrowding. Similar to the JCCs of today, the early Y.M-Y.W.H.A provided a sense of Jewish identity and camaraderie through physical, educational, cultural and community based programming.
Category
Arts
Education
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
July 1991
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Number
AC 284
Subject
Salsberg, J.B.
Interview Date
July 1991
Quantity
1
AccessionNumber
2004-1-4
Total Running Time
60 min or less
Biography
Rabbi Nachman Shemen was a Talmudic scholar, journalist, scholar, teacher, “mediator par excellence” and the author of more than 20 books. His contribution to Jewish scholarship included interpretations on Biblical, Talmudic, rabbinic and literary studies. The two volumes, published in Tel Aviv In Yiddish, discuss issues that date back to the creation and the Book of Genesis, up to more recent current day controversial issues as conversion and assimilation.
The rabbinic scholar was born in Chodel, Poland, a small town near Lublin, just before the outbreak of the First World War. Shemen's great-grandfather was a disciple of the founder of Chassidism in Poland, the “Seer of Lublin.” Both his parents were descendants of chassidism and scholars. When he was just over 17 years old, he received rabbinic ordination, and In 1930, moved to Canada with his family.
A founder of COR the Kashruth supervisory body, Shemen made COR one of the largest and most respected kosher organizations in North America. For over 40 years, Shemen served as director of the Kashruth Council and Rabbinical Vaad Hakashruth of the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Jewish Congress. He was one of the founders of Congregation Torah V’Avoda and was associated with the Eitz Chaim Schools where he taught for over 25 years. He was a longtime contributor to Yiddish newspapers and wrote many articles, sometimes using the pseudonym “A Reporter,” on Jewish issues and about the early Jewish community of Toronto. He died in 1993.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman
Original Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
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