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6 records – page 1 of 1.
Address
55 Baldwin Street
Source
Landmarks

Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families met basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work.
Address
55 Baldwin Street
Time Period
1930-[ca.1942]
Scope Note
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families met basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work.
History
In the 1930s, the United Welfare Clothing Centre was established to provide clients of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau, Jewish Big Sisters Committee, Jewish Big Brother Movement, and the JIAS Refugee Establishment Committee with clothing. The Centre’s finances and daily operations were managed by the JFWB’s Clothing Committee; however, other organizations also participated in its operation. For instance, the Rest Home Club collected, sorted and cleaned used clothing, and members of the Community Sewing Centre regularly made clothes for the Centre. The Centre was located at 55 Baldwin Street and likely stopped operating in the early 1940s due to a lack of funds and donations.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
179 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
179 Beverley Street
Time Period
1928-1945
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
Original affiliated agencies of the FJPT were: the Ladies Co-operative Board, the Jewish Orphans' Home, the Jewish Girls Club, the Junior Council of Jewish Women, the Hebrew Ladies Maternity Aid and Sewing Circle, the Hebrew Young ladies Boot and Shoe Society, the Sewing Circle, the Jewish Branch of the Big Brotherhood Movement, the Hebrew Free Loan Society, the Jewish Dispensary, and the Hebrew Burial Society
In 1924, six new agencies were added to the FJPT. They were: Mount Sinai Hospital, the Jewish Boys' and Girls' Camp, Jewish Big Sisters, the Fmily Welare Bureau, the Federation Health Clinic and the Federation Eployment Bureau.
Category
Organization
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
150 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
Address
150 Beverley Street
Time Period
1948-1983
Scope Note
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was made a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in March, 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto. The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverley St., but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe St. and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley St., which was renamed "Scheuer House" after the FJPT's first president, Edmund Scheuer.
History
They moved to Dundas Square in the late 1940s and then occupied a number of different buildings until they moved into their long term home at 150-152 Beverley Street in 1948 where they remained until July 1983. This building was called the J. Irving Olebaum. As the community moved north, the the J. Irving Oelbaum Centre building was eventually sold in 1983 and the United Jewish Welfare Fund moved to the Lipa Green building at Bathurst and Sheppard. The building on Beverley Street was mysteriously burned down.
Category
Social Service
Organization
Source
Landmarks
Address
29 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events. By 1938 the Home had expanded into its neighboring houses at 29, 33, and 35 Cecil Street and was caring for 115 residents. It provided residents with synagogue services, a hospital ward and social activities.
Address
29 Cecil Street
Time Period
1917-1954
Scope Note
As early as 1916 the Ezras Noshem Society (a mutual benefit society for Jewish women) started to raise funds to purchase and renovate what would become The Toronto Jewish Old Folks' Home (Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care’s forerunner) after its members recognized the need for a home in Toronto where the Jewish elderly could receive kosher meals and communicate with staff in their own language. Property at 31 Cecil Street was purchased in 1917 and sometime between September 1918 and January 1920 the Home officially opened there. The Home was run by a small staff and the women of Ezras Noshem who volunteered their time to make beds, cook kosher meals, do laundry and sponsor fundraising events. By 1938 the Home had expanded into its neighboring houses at 29, 33, and 35 Cecil Street and was caring for 115 residents. It provided residents with synagogue services, a hospital ward and social activities.
History
At this time the Home also became a member of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. In 1946, the need for a larger and more modern building prompted a fundraising campaign and in 1954, the new building opened at 3650 Bathurst Street.
Category
Organization
Medical
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
37 Cecil Street
Source
Landmarks

The Folks Farein was first located at 23 Cecil St., however, at some point during the 1940s or 1950s they moved to 37 Cecil Street. In Yiddish Folks Farein translates to People’s Association. It is also known as the Hebrew National Association. They were formed in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as an organization dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. At this time, a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community by making available the services of doctors, midwives and the distribution of direct relief. In addition there was constant street¬corner preaching and proselytizatian. To counteract this, the Folks Ferein was formed. They offered a number of different services including child welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language classes, and help forJewish hospital patients who could not speak English.
Address
37 Cecil Street
Time Period
1914-
Scope Note
The Folks Farein was first located at 23 Cecil St., however, at some point during the 1940s or 1950s they moved to 37 Cecil Street. In Yiddish Folks Farein translates to People’s Association. It is also known as the Hebrew National Association. They were formed in 1914 by a group of Toronto Jewish immigrants as an organization dedicated to anti-missionary and educational outreach. At this time, a number of Jewish converts to Christianity sought to exploit the situation of poor Jews in the community by making available the services of doctors, midwives and the distribution of direct relief. In addition there was constant street¬corner preaching and proselytizatian. To counteract this, the Folks Ferein was formed. They offered a number of different services including child welfare for working mothers, a reading room, English language classes, and help forJewish hospital patients who could not speak English.
History
When the threat from missionaries was no longer an issue, they became a philanthropic society dedicated to ministering to the sick and needy. Under this revised mandate, the Folks Farein provided dentures, eyeglasses, orthopaedic shoes, operative support, crutches, artificial limbs and other related medical appliances wherever needed. They maintained close contact with hospitals, sanatoria, mental institutions, local jails and reformatories to help needy Jewish patients and prisoners. They also distributed kosher meals during Passover; helped seniors get old age pensions and widows and mothers and their children get allowances where fathers were sick or incapacitated; and fed and billeted the unemployed and homeless at the Folks Farein’s premises at 37 Cecil Street.
In 1945, when the first group of Jewish refugees from Europe arrived in Toronto, the Folks Farein temporarily accommodated many on its premises and provided them with meals.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Address
336 Annette Street
Source
Landmarks

The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
Address
336 Annette Street
Time Period
1922-1935
Scope Note
The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
History
The children went to local schools and attended Jewish Sunday School, as well as having Bar Mitzvah training. They were provided with clothing and meals, and had the opportunity to enjoy activities taking place within the home, such as cooking and drama. The Home was closed in 1935 due to disagreements between the newly established Jewish Children's Bureau's (JCB) and the Jewish Childrens' Home (JCH) around child welfare policies, as well as a need for the Federation to cut costs.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
6 records – page 1 of 1.

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