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2021 records – page 1 of 41.
Level
Item
ID
Item 514
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
514
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Custodial History
This item is a portrait of Ethel and Leib Hundert, taken in Czechoslovakia.
Notes
Acquired on June 22, 1975.
Name Access
Hundert, Ethel
Hundert, Leib
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Czechoslovakia
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1703
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1703
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 16 cm
Custodial History
This item is a studio photograph of the Rotenberg family, most likely taken in Poland. Rose Rotenberg (m. Nepom) is standing at the back.
Name Access
Nepom, Rose
Rotenberg family
Rotenberg, Rose
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1979-3-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1702
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1702
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1926]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm on matte 21 x 22 cm
Custodial History
This item is a studio photograph of the Rotenberg family, most likely taken in Poland. The space between the two daughters in the back row was intentional, in honour of a son who had immigrated to the United States. Rose Rotenberg (Nepom) is standing third from the right.
Name Access
Nepom, Rose
Rotenberg family
Rotenberg, Rose
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1979-3-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1696
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1696
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1919 or 1920]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a group of young members of Poalei Zion in Stashov, Poland. Pictured in the front row, far right, is Nacha Nepom. Front row, fourth from right, Abe Nepom. Abe and Nacha were siblings.
Name Access
Nepom, Abe
Nepom, Nacha
Poalei Zion
Subjects
Zionism
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
This photo is in poor condition. It has several cracks.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1979-3-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1695
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1695
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1929]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a group of young students with their teachers at the Talmud Torah Yeshiva in Stashov, Poland. Shmiel Nepom is pictured in the third row, fourth from the (left?).
Notes
Shmiel Nepom was the father of the donor.
Name Access
High Yeshiva for Instruction of Stashiver (Stashov, Poland)
Subjects
Students
Teachers
Yeshivas
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1979-3-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1275
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1275
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of an unidentified Jewish family, most likely taken in Poland.
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1977-4-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6035
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6035
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1929
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm on mat 31 x 33 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the Buffalo Campaign Committee for the Workers in Israel. The individuals include people from Toronto, such as I. J. Wienrot.
Notes
See accession record for further identification.
Subjects
Employees
Israel
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1992-2-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2340
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2340
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a studio portrait of an unidentified family from Europe.
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Europe
Accession Number
1980-9-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1698
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1698
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the grandparents of Alexander Nepomnisha, taken in Russia.
Name Access
Nepomnisha, Alexander
Subjects
Married people
Grandparents
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Russia
Accession Number
1979-3-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3042
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3042
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 10 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a passport photograph of Zelig Nisker, taken in Troisdorf, Germany.
Name Access
Nisker, Zelig
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Germany
Accession Number
1974-001
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3250
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3250
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of the Karen Hayesod Committee for Lublin and its vicinity. Pictured seated, third from the left is Rabbi Gutman Tuvia Rapoport, a director of the committee.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-11-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
17
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 11 cm on matte 24 x 16 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the Ladovsky family in Kielce, Poland. They are the relatives of Herman Ladovsky.
Notes
Originally cited as photo #3832.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
There are cacks at two corners of the matte.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2350
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2350
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 95 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a panoramic photograph of individuals standing outside at a Zionist Convention in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The convention was held July 10th-12th, 1927.
Subjects
Congresses and conventions
Zionism
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Winnipeg (Man.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3869
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3869
Material Format
graphic material
Date
June 1929
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w sepia toned ; 17 x 40 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a group of delegates to the Young Judaea national convention in Hamilton, Ontario. Included are A. M. Klein, Lionel Gelber and possibly John Devor.
Subjects
Congresses and conventions
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1984-1-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Annual Bazaar series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 71; Series 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Annual Bazaar series
Level
Series
Fonds
71
Series
1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1924-2006
Physical Description
90 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 1924 the first official Toronto annual Hadassah Bazaar was held at the Masonic Temple at Davenport and Yonge. Over the years, venues changed with increasing demands for space as the popularity of the event grew. These locations included Varsity Stadium (1945-1948), the Automotive Building at the CNE (1949-1999), and currently the CNE’s National Trade Centre (Direct Energy Centre).Toronto pioneered the mammoth volunteer-run bazaar concept and was followed by other cities – Montreal (ca.1932), Vancouver (1951) and a number of smaller communities.
Admission fees were documented from 25 cents in 1934 to $4 in the 1990s.In most instances throughout the years, reduced or free admission was offered to preschoolers and seniors.
The early bazaars sold used clothing, hand sewn articles and home cooked kosher specialties. The 1930s saw the introduction of “carnival elements” such as fortune telling and bingo, and social events that included dinners, floor shows and dancing to the music of well known bands. The “Beautiful Child Photography Contests”, fashion shows, art exhibits, and the Hadassah Exposition and Bazaar Cooking Schools were inaugurated during the same decade.
During the Second World War, the Red Cross and war efforts were incorporated into bazaar activities. In the 1950s auctions were introduced.1963 saw the first Eilat Lighthouse – a colossal advertising pyramid. From the 1970s to the 1990s, new features such as clothes boutiques, mini-stores, and disco contests appeared.
Proceeds from the fairs and bazaars from the Bazaar’s inception until recent years rose exponentially from a thousand or so dollars to hundreds of thousands. These funds have generally been directed to medical and welfare services for needy women and children in Israel. From 1939-45, some of the monies were directed to war projects in Palestine, England, and Egypt. Recent beneficiaries include Asaf Harofe Rehabilitation Hospital, Nahalal (a co-educational secondary school focusing on farming technology), and medical research at the Hebrew University.
Enthusiastic crowds of up to 60,000 continue to line up at 6 am on the last Wednesday of October every year. The City of Toronto has recognized the Bazaar since 1989 with it’s proclamation of “Hadassah – Wizo Bazaar Day”.
From modest beginnings, Toronto’s Hadassah Bazaar has evolved into what is billed as the “largest one day bazaar in the world”.
The 84th was the last bazaar held in October 2008.
Scope and Content
The series consists of records in the form of textual documents, photographs, posters, scrapbooks and audio- visual recordings that document the history of the Toronto Hadassah Bazaar from 1924-2006.These include activities such as social events, meetings, rallies, as well as records including press clippings, memorabilia, correspondence, and financial reports.
Photo Captions:
028 - [Unidentified], Ella Fleischmann, [Unidentified], Israel Booth at Hadassah Bazaar, Exhibition Place, Toronto, Ontario [ca. 1965].
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 2472 photographs, 3 posters, 2 audio recordings, 4 video recordings, 2 artifacts, and 8 scrapbooks.
Subjects
Bazaars (Charities)
Arrangement
The textual records are aranged in chronological order and then by activity such as planning, correspondence and publicity.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 71
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hadassah-WIZO fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
71
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1924-2006
Physical Description
11 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The first Canadian chapter of Hadassah was established in Toronto in 1916. Subsequent chapters emerged in other large Canadian cities thereafter. In 1919 several chapters organized to form the Hadassah Organization of Canada. And in 1921, Hadassah Canada joined the Women’s International Zionist Organization (WIZO), and subsequently changed its name to Hadassah-WIZO. The original goal of Hadassah was to raise funds for refugees in Eastern Europe. Later on, their mandate shifted to that of providing money and support for the Jews in Israel. Although it spent a great deal of time and resources raising funds for this cause, Hadassah-WIZO was a philanthropic organization that encouraged productivity rather than charity.
Today, Hadassah-WIZO is the largest organization of Jewish women in Canada. In addition to providing Jewish women with an opportunity to liaise with other women from the community and volunteer for a worthy cause, this organization also promotes some important national and international goals. These goals include: encouraging Jewish and Hebrew culture in Canada; extending the material and moral support of Jewish women in Canada to the people of Israel who require assistance; and cooperating with other organizations in the promotion of Canadian ideals of democracy.
The records in this fonds were created by the Toronto chapter of Hadassah-WIZO. The Toronto chapter is not only the oldest, but also one of the largest and most active affiliates of the 304 Hadassah-WIZO chapters in Canada. Some of the activities that it sponsors include the famous annual bazaar, which was started in 1924 and is one of the largest in North America. They also contribute to the support of a host of Canadian Hadassah-WIZO initiatives in Israel which include: the Nahalal School, the Netanya Technological High School, the Hadassim Children and Youth Village, several day care centres, women’s and youth clubs, the Hadassah-WIZO Canada Research Institute, and two medical centers. The Toronto chapter in particular sponsors youth aliyah, and raises funds and honours important volunteers through the organization of tribute dinners, golf tournaments, and other events. Finally, this chapter is also responsible for producing the Hadassah Reporter, which is the newsletter that documents the activities of the Toronto chapter.
Custodial History
The records were acquired from the main Hadassah office on Sheppard Ave.
Scope and Content
The records in this fonds document the activities of Toronto Hadassah-WIZO. They include the Hadassah magazine the Reporter as well as the national publication Orah. The fonds also consists of photographs, minutes of meetings, certificates, press clippings, correspondence, audio-visual material, posters and scrapbooks.
Notes
Associated material note: The Library and Archives of Canada also possesses material created by members of Toronto Hadassah.
Name Access
Toronto Hadassah-Wizo
Creator
Toronto Hadassah-Wizo (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
2003-3-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ajalon Lodge fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 72
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ajalon Lodge fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
72
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1929-1986
Physical Description
ca. 1.25 metres of textual records
ca. 15 scrapbooks
ca. 20 objects
Admin History/Bio
The Ajalon Lodge was first organized on 10 March 1929 as the Ajalon Club of Young Judaea. The founding members were Abe Bohnen, Hyman Cohen, Isaac Gringorten, George (Hamell) Himmelstein and Lou Hochman. The group met at the Zionist Institute at 206 Beverley Street in Toronto. The name was selected by Abe Bohnen and Mark Zimmerman, the Young Judaea supervisor, from a map of Palestine which hung in the Young Judaea library.
The first leader of the club was Morris Kertzer followed by Al Zimmerman. In 1930 the lodge began to record its activities in scrapbooks, which it later named the Ajalon Archives. The archivists over the years included Max Schwadron, Ben Marks, Myer Bromberg, and Willie Zimmerman.
The club was actively involved in Young Judaea literary, social, and fundraising activities. In 1935, the club graduated from the Young Judaea movement and become a lodge of the Zionist Order Habonim. By 1939 however, the Ajalon, Balfour, Bialik, and Jaffa lodges merged into the Toronto Habonim Lodge due the waning membership as many men went off to war. After the war, the four lodges returned to their original state. In 1940, the lodge acquired club rooms on the third floor of the Zionist Building and in 1944 several wives of lodge members organized the Ajalon Ladies Auxiliary. By 1953, Habonim became the Zionist Men’s Association of Canada, an affiliate organization of the Zionist Organization of Canada and by the 1960s, Ajalon Lodge became directly affiliated with ZOC. Over the course of its existence membership in the lodge has been between 40 and 90 members.
Ajalon Lodge participated in many fundraising campaigns for Jewish organizations in Toronto, such as the Jewish National Fund and the United Palestine Appeal. Many of its members also served on the board of directors for organizations such as the Toronto Zionist Council and Young Judaea. The lodge was involved in several fundraising initiatives, including the establishment of a kindergarten in Ashkelon, Israel in 1972. In later years the Ajalon Lodge was affiliated with the Zionist Organization of Canada.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of both Willie Zimmerman and Meyer Bromberg before they were donated to the Archives in 1984, 1988, and 1994.
Scope and Content
This fonds primarily consists of the records collected and created by the Ajalon Archives Committee, under the direction of Max Schwadron, Ben Marks, Myer Bromberg, and Willie Zimmerman. The archives are organized into scrapbooks by year and relate first to activities of Ajalon Club as a chapter of Young Judaea and then to Ajalon Lodge as a chapter of the Zionist Order Habonim. Later scrapbooks represent the lodge’s activities as part of the broader Zionist network affiliated with the Zionist Organization of Canada. The scrapbooks consist of photographs, event invitations, pamphlets and flyers, correspondence, editorial writings, newsletters, newsclippings, meeting minutes, activity reports, and ephemera. They begin in 1929 and run to 1983.
Also included in the fonds are the meeting minutes, financial reports and general correspondence files of the lodge, as well as several artifacts collected by Meyer Bromberg while he was the acting archivist.
Name Access
Ajalon Lodge (Toronto, Ont.)
Subjects
Zionism
Physical Condition
Some of the early scrapbooks are in poor condition. The pages are brittle and are crumbling along the edges. As well, the scrapbooks require tissue-paper linings between the pages to separate the various media contained within and to prevent any further degredation, particularly of the photographs. Many of the photos in the later scrapbooks require rehousing in acid-free melanex.
Related Material
Related material can be found in the Zionist Organization of Canada fonds 28, the Meyer Bromberg fonds, the Maurice Berg fonds and the Willie Zimmerman fonds 41.
Creator
Ajalon Lodge (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1984-11-2
1988-6-5
1994-10-3
2005-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 74
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
74
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
1914-1986
Physical Description
35 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 79 cm or smaller
2 folders of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Brigade was a member of the Great War Association in the 1920s. After its first president was installed in the early 1930s, the Royal Canadian Legion granted a charter for a Jewish veterans' branch. The brigade was renamed the General Wingate Branch in the mid-1940s after the British army officer Major General Orde Charles Wingate, DSO. Although Major Wingate was not Jewish, he was a passionate Zionist, hence the name.
At first, the branch met at a veteran’s hall at Crawford and College Streets in Toronto, but later purchased its own house at 1610 Bathurst Street. In 1968, the branch moved to Eglinton Avenue West. It was then located at the Zionist Centre on Marlee Avenue.
The branch held an annual memorial march and service at the Mt. Sinai Cemetery, and distributed poppies to raise funds for veterans and their families, hospitals and medical research. Members also gave speeches at schools on Remembrance Day. It closed in September 2018 after more than eighty years.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of photographs and textual records that document the activities and history of the General Wingate Branch 256. Included are images of parades, memorials, picnics and executive members. There is also one 1950s branch newsletter documenting the branch's purchase of Wingate House.
Name Access
Royal Canadian Legion. General Wingate Branch 256
Subjects
Jewish veterans--Canada
Related Material
See also Fonds 51, series 5-3, file 15 for images of Remembrance Day ceremonies held by the General Wingate Branch 256.
Creator
General Wingate Branch 256, Royal Canadian Legion (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Canada
Accession Number
1976-9-1
1987-12-1
2007-1-3
2007-12-10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 78
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
78
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[189-]-1997
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
176 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
2 photographs (jpg) : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Sadie Stren was born on April 19, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan. Her father and mother had come from a small town in Russia. Samuel Goldberg, her father, arrived to stay with family in Brantford, Ontario in 1910 and began working as a peddler. He moved to Detroit, Michigan in 1912 where he worked for the Ford Motor Company and later owned a confectionary store. Emma, Sadie’s mother, came from Russia to reunite with Samuel after he began living in Detroit and the couple married and started a family there.
Sadie grew up in a predominately Jewish neighbourhood in Detroit with her parents and her sister Sarah. She graduated from what is now Wayne State University and worked as a social studies teacher in Detroit for approximately 10 years, until she married at age 31. Sadie first met her husband, Maurice "Maurie" Strenkovsky (1910-1995), while visiting relatives in Brantford. By the time the two had met, Maurie was going by the last name Stren, although it is not certain when he began to do so. He served in the Second World War and corresponded with Sadie during their courtship. The two married in 1947, five years after meeting. The couple initially lived in Detroit, where their son David was born on August 28, 1948, but soon moved to Brantford, where Sadie gave birth to a daughter, Patti, on August 8, 1949. Maurie became a manufacturer of surgical dressing and continued in this profession until his retirement.
When Sadie first moved to Brantford, she joined several Jewish women’s organizations, including Hadassah. She has continued to be actively involved in both Jewish and non-Jewish community organizations since that time. She ran and taught the Beth David Sunday school in Brantford for many years, and in 1976, was honoured for her work as Sunday school supervisor by the Beth David Sisterhood. During her time in Brantford, Sadie served on the board of directors for eight different organizations, and was the president of four. She was a member of the board of directors for the Family Service Bureau and was elected president in 1966. She is also a past president of the University Women’s Club and a former board member of the YM-YWCA. Her husband was quite active in the community as well. Maurie Stren’s commitments included serving as President of B’nai B’rith Brantford from 1965-1966 and as District Governor of the Lions Club from 1963-64, among other things.
Upon moving to Toronto, Sadie became a member of the Baycrest Women’s Auxiliary and volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital and the Aphasia Institute.
Sadie was an amateur historian who served as the Brantford Jewish community's archivist and historian for a number of years. She had been collecting sources of Brantford Jewish history in her home since at least the 1970s in order to assemble the history of Brantford's community. Sadie was also an author who wrote about the history of the Brantford community, spoke at conferences, and was a contributor to the Canadian Jewish Historical Society Journal in 1981. She passed away on December 9, 2014. She was one hundred.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Sadie Stren in five different transfers from 1976-2006. The first accession was received as a part of the small communities project in 1976 and included only photographs. Subsequent accessions included photographs and textual documents relating to both Sadie’s family and the Brantford community. Sadie is an author and she acquired some of the materials when researching the history of the Brantford community.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material created and collected by Sadie Stren related to the Brantford Jewish community, as both a member of the community and an author researching its history. Among the records are newspaper and article clippings, correspondence, research notes, records of the Brantford Hebrew Association, miscellaneous printed and published material, Hadassah minutes, records related to Congregation Beth David and its Hebrew school and photographs.
The Brantford Hebrew Association records include 3 ledger books which span the years between 1909 to 1952, legal documents for the Association including the original letters patent incorporating the Brantford Hebrew Association in 1911.
Notes
Some of the photographs are modern copies of older photographs.
Some early accessions contained photocopies of orginal documents that were eventually donated in later transfers. These photocopies were culled.
Many photographs were described at the item level at the time they were accessioned, but there are quite a few photographs in the fonds which have not yet been described in detail.
Name Access
Stren, Sadie, 1915-2014
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Volunteers
Related Material
For additional material related to the Brantford Jewish community see also accession #1978-11-4, accession #2009-2-5, oral history #AC91, and accession #2004-5-71.
Creator
Stren, Sadie, 1915-
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-6-9
1977-5-6
1978-11-3
2005-11-10
2006-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 82
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
82
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1922-2000
Physical Description
2 scrapbooks : 65 x 48 cm and 34 x 30 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sammy Luftspring was born on May 14, 1916 in "The Ward" in Toronto. His parents were working-class Jews who emigrated from Eastern Europe. Sammy began training as a youth at the Brunswick YMHA. He lived in Kensington Market and attended B'nai Brith summer camp as a youngster. In 1932 he started entering boxing matches. He competed in 105 fights and only lost five bouts, capturing the Golden Glove tournaments in the weight classes ranging from bantamweight to welterweight. Sammy became famous for his fighting prowess as well as his Jewish pride, always sporting a Star of David on his boxing shorts.
By 1933, he became the Ontario lightweight champion, representing the Elm Grove boxing club. That same year, he took part in the Christie Pits riot. Because of his accomplishments in the ring and his contribution to his community, he became a highly respected athlete within the Jewish community.
In 1936, he was selected for the Canadian team to take part in the Berlin Olympics that year. Although he was eager to compete, his parents and the community pressured him to boycott the games in protest over the Nazis' treatment of Jews in Germany. Luftspring and "Baby Yak," another famous local Jewish boxer, decided to participate instead in the alternate games in Barcelona, Spain, called the People's Olympics. After making the trip to Europe by ship, the two faced the disappointment of having the event cancelled after the Spanish Civil War broke out on the eve of the opening ceremonies.
After his return to Toronto, Luftspring began to box professionally. In 1938, he won the Canadian welterweight championship after a 15-round fight where he defeated Frank Genovese. He held the title for two years. During a fight in New York against Steve Belloise, Luftspring was poked in the eye, resulting in a detached retina. This injury left him blind in one eye, ending his boxing career.
By 1948, he began a new career as a boxing referee. He refereed for several decades, overseeing some of the most celebrated fights of that time. He also ran a nightclub in Toronto called the Mercury Club with three partners. It attracted famous entertainers such as Henry Youngman, Vic Damone, and Tony Bennett. He subsequently ran other nightclubs such as the Tropicana.
In addition to his boxing career, Sammy was also a devoted family man. He married his wife Elsie in 1938 at the McCaul Street synagogue. Three hundred and fifty people attended and hundreds waited outside of the synagogue to wish them well. They had two children: Brian and Orian.
His biography, Call Me Sammy, was published in 1975. Luftspring was given the great honour in 1985 of being inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. He passed away on September 27, 2000.
Custodial History
The scrapbooks were created by Sammy Luftspring. He kept them at his house and when he passed away they were safegaurded by his son Brian.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of two scrapbooks that reflect Sammy Luftspring's personal life and various careers as a boxer, referee, author, and nightclub manager and owner. Scrapbooks contain correspondence, ephemera, newspaper clippings, brochures, autographs, coins, and approximately 700 photographs.
Personal records include photographs of Sammy and his family during his childhood, family weddings, trips and vacations, and other family events, such as birthday parties and his son's bar mitzvah. There are also letters and cards from Sammy's wife, children, grandchildren and friends, and other ephemeral items Sammy collected, such as ticket stubs from baseball games.
Professional records include images of Sammy training for upcoming boxing matches, portraits of Sammy posing in his boxing attire, images from the grand opening of the Mercury Club, photographs of Sammy as a referee, as well as photographs of Sammy at various celebrity boxing matches. There is also correspondence and a brochure documenting Sammy's incorporation into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and some correspondence regarding the publication and promotion of his book. Finally, there are numerous newspaper clippings relating to all of Sammy's professional endeavours.
Name Access
Luftspring, Sammy, 1916-2000
Subjects
Boxers (Sports)
Physical Condition
The scrapbooks are in poor condition. Many of the photographs, documents and clippings were glued to the pages and the pages have almost all fallen out of the bindings.
Related Material
1981-1-7
Arrangement
The scrapbooks have been kept intact and no arrangement has been done. However, some of the key images have been scanned and item level descriptions have been completed for them.
Creator
Luftspring, Sammy, 1916-2000
Accession Number
2009-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 83
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
83
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1890]-2012
Physical Description
3.5 cm of textual records
185 photographs : b&w and col. and sepia toned ( 10 negatives, 4 slides, 3 contact prints) ; 26 x 20 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Aaron Ladovsky (1888-1960) was born in 1888 in Kielce, Poland. He immigrated to Toronto in 1906 at the age of 18. Soon after arriving, Aaron Ladovsky worked to help form a Jewish bakers’ union to advocate for collective rights among Jewish Bakers. In 1911 he married Sarah Eichler who was from his home town of Kielce, Poland. In 1912 he opened the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant at Dundas and Bay Streets (known then as Agnes and Teraulay Streets respectively) in the heart of the Ward. That same year, the couple had twin sons, Herman and Samuel, who were born on September 23, 1912.
Only a short time later, in 1920, Aaron moved the location of his restaurant to 338 Spadina Avenue, just north of Dundas. He and his family lived in an apartment upstairs. Herman and Samuel attended Hester How Elementary School until 1919, Lord Lansdowne Public School once the family moved to Spadina, and later Central Commerce. The twins worked in the family business in the 1920s delivering fresh breads and buns by horse cart.
Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913, a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, his son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over managment. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years, until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years. Today, Philip and Ruth carry on the family tradition of running United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. In May 2012 the restaurant celebrated its 100th anniversary.
Custodial History
The records were donated in multiple small accessions by Herman Ladovsky from 1977 until 2004.
It appears as though previous archivists integrated some materials into a manuscript group relating to Aaron Ladovsky and then later deconstructed a portion of this group into original accessions. Also, a number of periodicals and textual materials from these accessions were integrated into various other manuscript groups and remain there.
One item, a Lord Lansdowne School anniversary booklet which contains a photocopy of Herman's student record, remained in the Aaron Ladovsky manuscript group. This item could not be identified as part of a previous accession, but has been integrated into the fonds as it appears to have been donated by Herman.
Photo #3050 was not associated with an accession number, but documents United Bakers Dairy Restaurant and was likely donated by Herman Ladovsky.
Recent accruals have been donated by Ruth Ladovsky.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records documenting the Ladovsky family in Kielce, Poland and Toronto. It is primarily made up of photographs of Ladovsky family members in Kielce and Toronto, and of various organizations that Aaron and Herman were involved in. There are also a few textual records that document the Ladovsky family and their involvement in the Kieltzer Society.
Notes
Newspaper clippings were photocopied and placed in the Aaron Ladovsky vertical file.
Many photographs were originally cited with diifferent numbers. These numbers are mentioned below photo descriptions.
Name Access
Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Ladovsky, Aaron, 1888-1960 (creator)
Ladovsky (family)
Ladovsky, Herman, 1912-2002 (creator)
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant (subject)
Related Material
Se MG 2B-1R
See vertical file on Aaron Ladovsky
Arrangement
Records have been organized by media and chronology due to low volume and disparate subject matter. Textual records have been arranged in 17 files. Photographs have been arranged chronologically and are largely described at the item level.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-7-5
1978-12-7
1981-1-2
1983-11-6
1988-4-12
1993-10-1
1994-1-3
1999-11-4
2000-4-4
2004-5-21
2004-5-82
2008-4-9
MG 6 E6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 83; File 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
Fonds
83
File
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1921-1950
Physical Description
1 folder of textual record
Scope and Content
File consists of receipts for monetary donations and transfers. The receipts were likely related to Aaron's work with the Kieltzer Society. Also included is a Standard Theatres Ltd. receipt for $60. This receipt was likely for the purchase of shares in the theatre, which is the method the company used to fundraise for its construction.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 24 x 18 cm on matte 32 x 24 cm
Scope and Content
Item is 2 copies of a portrait of Aaron Ladovsky seated in a chair.
Notes
Photograph by Famous Photo Studios, G. Mendlevich, Prop., 402 Spadina Ave., Toronto
Originally cited as photo # 6222.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1999-11-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 83; File 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
File
Fonds
83
File
21
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1927]
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w and sepia ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Hilda Eckler was Herman Ladovsky's first cousin. She was born on May 25, 1912 in Toronto. She was an actress and dancer and later moved to the United States and became a performer with the Rockettes and the Ziegfeld Follies. Hilda became a United States citizen in 1928 and married Archie Himmel in New York in May 1945. She died on November 22, 1999 in Miami.
Scope and Content
Portraits of the dancer Hilda Eckler in ballet and dance costumes in a variety of poses. Two photographs are signed by Hilda.
Notes
Photographs 6227 and 6228 by Frank B. Moore, 108 Baronne Street, New Orleans
Photograph 6233 by Alexandra Studios, Toronto, Canada
Formerly cited as photographs 6227 - 6233.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2000-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 82; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
82
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
9 June 1922
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of the Luftspring family. Picture was taken at Cecil Street Synagogue to mark the marriage of Max Lightstone and Goldie Grossman.
Front Row (left to right): Jean, Freida, Sammy; Back Row: Annie, Bella Luftspring (Sammy's mother), Pearl, Sammy's grandfather, Molly, Sammy's grandmother, Clara, Yossel Luftspring (Sammy's father), Rose
Notes
Image is located on Page 28 of the 34 x 30 cm scrapbook.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2009-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 82; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
82
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1922
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Photograph of Sammy Luftspring at age 6 at the family home on Baldwin Street, Toronto.
Notes
Image is located on Page 27 of the 65 x 48 cm scrapbook
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2009-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 82; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sammy Luftspring fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
82
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1925
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Photograph of the Goldman family. The Goldman children are Sylvia, Molly, Fran and Elsie (d. 1992). Elsie Goldman (pictured on far right) married Sammy Luftspring in 1938.
Notes
Image is located on Page 43 of the 65 x 48 cm scrapbook.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2009-10-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 6571
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
6571
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1929
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 95 x 27 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph depicting the members of the Judea Lodge Knights of Phythias standing in front of the Ash-Lodge in Toronto, 1929.
Notes
Photo by Dominion Panoramic Photographers.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2004-5-29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 85
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
85
Material Format
textual record
Date
1922-1999
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The original Toronto Hebrew Free Loan agency was formed in 1911 under the Associated Hebrew Charities. Its Hebrew name was G'milath Chasodim, which means to do good deeds. Initially all of the loans that it gave out were guaranteed by individuals from the community. This body went into debt in 1917. In 1922, with the administrative support of the Toronto Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and the financial support of B'nai Brith, a new free loan society was established.
The first president was Sam Kronick, the vice president was Nathan Phillips, and the treasurer was Elias Pullan—three extremely high profile citizens within the community and Toronto. The first meeting was held at the Zionist Institute on Beverley Street. By 1923 they had hired a secretary and executive secretary, Moses Oelbaum. The society was incorporated on 12 July 1924. Their mandate was to prevent pauperism and preserve the self respect of individuals. Many of the early loans that came in during that period were through referrals from other Jewish organizations. In 1925, they reviewed 625 applications and approved 510 loans which ranged from $25 to $200, allocating $9307.92 in total. They did not charge interest and had the borrower repay the loan at a rate of $2 to $10 a week.
In 1942 the Moses Oelbaum fund was established with capital of $10,000. Historically, B'nai Brith and the National Council of Women provided the funds for student loans. In 1957, the Scholarship Aid program began to operate under the auspices of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. By 1974, the THLA had given out over 5 million dollars in loans to over 20,000 families. In 1985, through a merger of Toronto's business, personal and educational loan agencies, the Toronto Jewish Free Loan Cassa was formed.
Today, the Loan Cassa has over 700 active clients and gives out over $1,500,000 in loans each year to the needy as well as in the form of scholarships and business start up loans. The rate of defaults has been extremely low, less than one percent. As a result, this program has helped strengthen the community by sustaining and investing in its members. The name was formally changed to Jewish Free Loan Toronto in 2012.
Scope and Content
The records consist of minutes of meetings, correspondence, financial statements, loan ledger books, loan guarantee cards, case files, cash books and receipts, court records relating to trusts and wills and other material.
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Accession Number
1986-11/4; MG 201D; 1989-12/2, 1999-7/1; 2004-5/122.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Marc Bernstein fonds
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Marc Bernstein fonds
Level
Item
Date
[ca. 1927]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 11 x 16 cm
Scope and Content
Item is an original and copy photograph of Rabbi Mendel Berman who performed in Toronto during the 1920s and moved to Israel later on and died there around 1935.
Name Access
Berman, Mendel
Subjects
Occupations
Religion
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1992-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
1 photograph
Scope and Content
Item is a postcard photograph of two unidentified girls in clown costumes.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
7 Aug. 1922
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Item is a group photograph of the West Toronto Ladies Aid Soceity in High Park, Toronto.
Subjects
Societies
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2003-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
9 Nov. 1929
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Yonge Street looking south from Wilton Square.
Subjects
Streets
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
The City of Toronto Archives has the same image in Fonds 16, series 71, item 7435.
Places
Yonge Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-12-14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 44; Item 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
44
Item
27
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7.5 x 10cm
Admin History/Bio
Etta Simon (1874-1967), and her husband Ephram Simon (1876-1938), moved to Canada in 1904. Their children include, Ben Simon (1905-1996), Rea (1902-?), Leah (1905-1976) and Helen (1911-?).
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait Leah Simon and her friends.
Left to right: Lena Gang, Fanny Taube, and Leah Simon.
Subjects
Friendship
Portraits, Group
Women
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
Corners have been folded. Black paper is glued to the verso of the photograph. Indentations and markings seen thoughout.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
35
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[between 1925 and 1928]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w and sepia ; 9 x 14 cm and 8 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is an original and a copy photograph of (left to right) Rose Haniford Green, Sarah Ladovsky, and Mary Haniford Pancer in front of United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. Rose and Mary are sisters and Sarah is their aunt.
Notes
Original photo was cited as photo # 3050.
One photo is a copy of the original retained for reference.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Aaron and Sarah Ladovsky with their nephews in front of United Bakers Dairy Restaurant.
Notes
Originally cited as photo #1444.
Name Access
Ladovsky, Aaron
Ladovsky, Sarah
United Bakers
Subjects
Bakeries
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 19
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
19
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 20 x 26 cm on matte 28 x 35 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a group photograph of Toronto members of the Kieltzer Society on the roof top of the United Bakers Restaurant.
Seated left to right: S. Levy; A. Ladovsky; F. Bimko, _ Levy.
Standing left to right: Joe Eisenberg (Isenberg); Lazor Ladowsky; Harry Charendoff; Moshe Cooper; Joe Berkowsky; H. Kornbloom; Noson Yasne; _ Eisenberg (Isenberg).
Name Access
Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society
Levy, S.
Ladovsky, A.
Bimko, F.
Levy
Eisneberg, Joe (Isenberg)
Ladowsky, Lazor
Charendoff, Harry
Cooper, Moshe
Berkowsky, Joe
Kornbloom, H.
Yasne, Noson
Eisenberg
Isenberg
Subjects
Societies
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 83; File 9; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
83
File
9
Item
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia toned ; 17 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of several members of the Kieltzer Society in Toronto. Standing left to right are Kornbloom, S. Levy, and Joe Berkowsky.Seated left to right are A. Yashne, Guest, and A. Ladovsky.
Notes
Originally cited as photo # 3843.
Name Access
Ladovsky, A.
Yashne, A.
Berkowsky, Joe
Levy, S.
Kornbloom
Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society
Subjects
Portraits, Group
Societies
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1983-11-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 87
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
87
Material Format
textual record
architectural drawing
Date
1928-1943
Physical Description
67 cm of textual records
1 architectural drawing
Admin History/Bio
Sometime around 1919, the Family Welfare Committee was set up within the newly created Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (FJPT) to perform social welfare work with Jewish families. Around 1931, the Committee was reorganized as an independent member agency of the FJPT and renamed the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau (JFWB). At the same time, Dora Wilensky (1902-1959), a professionally-trained social worker, was hired as the agency’s executive director. Throughout its existence, most of its funding came from the FJPT (later the United Jewish Welfare Fund).
Located at 179 Beverley Street, the JFWB’s core activities included: relief provision; helping families meet basic needs, such as medical care, heating and clothing; housekeeping assistance; counseling; and case work. The JFWB’s major concerns shifted over time from a rise of immigration and desertion cases in the 1920s to the dramatic increase of wife abuse, suicide, and unemployment cases during the Great Depression of the 1930s. After the outbreak of the Second World War, the JFWB sought ways of assisting soldiers and their families, such as, investigating special government grants to soldiers.
In an attempt to meet community needs, the JFWB initiated various programs, such as a Homemaking Club to teach women house management skills, and a Clothing Centre to provide families with inexpensive household goods. It also partnered with other local Jewish organizations in the early 1940s in the Liaison Project for troubled Jewish youth. In the 1930s, the Jewish Employment Service and Hebrew Free Burial Society became departments of the JFWB and, in 1941, the JFWB began guaranteeing loans for clients through the Hebrew Free Loan Association. In the same year, the Jewish Big Sister Committee became affiliated with the agency and the Jewish Big Brother Movement followed soon after.
In 1936, the JFWB became one of the first unionized social agencies in Canada when it formed the Staff Association with the Jewish Child Welfare Association (JCWA), another member of the FJPT. Although the JFWB’s focus was work with families and the JCWA’s focus was work with children, both agencies found it necessary at times to work with both children and families. In order to prevent service duplication and reduce confusion over casework responsibility, the Joint Application Bureau was set up within the FJPT to review all case work applications and determine the appropriate agency to provide assistance. However, a merger between the agencies was still believed necessary to improve service to the community and ease confusion. Discussions regarding the co-ordination of services between the JCWA and the JFWB began as early as 1935 and in February 1943, the JCWA and JFWB merged to form the Jewish Family and Child Services (JF & CS).
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of textual records and one architectural drawing documenting the programs, operation, finances, and special studies of the Jewish Family Welfare Bureau as well as its relationships with other organizations. Included are reports, meeting notices, agendas and minutes, correspondence, memos, budgets, statistics, theatrical scripts, newsclippings, and one architectural blueprint. A number of the records relate to special short-lived committees and projects that the JFWB participated in with other agencies, such as the Jewish Big Sister Committee, Jewish Big Brother Committee, Jewish Child Welfare Association, the Jewish Community Centre Association, the Young Men's and Women's Hebrew Association, and the Jewish Old Folks' Home.
Records have been arranged into the following 19 series: 1. Board of Directors; 2. Executive Director; 3. Jewish Federation Communal Council; 4. United Jewish Welfare Fund Men's and Women's Service Council; 5. Case Committe; 6. Joint Meetings and Committees; 7. Joint Application Bureau; 8. Homemaking Club; 9. Clothing Centre; 10. Liaison Project; 11. Operational statistics; 12. Finance and accounting; 13. Human Resources; 14. Special projects and studies; 15. Publicity; 16. Liaison with other social welfare organizations; 17. Canadian Association of Social Workers; 18. Welfare Council of Toronto; and, 19. Conferences.
Notes
Associated material note: for related records held at the City of Toronto Archives, see also: Welfare Council of Toronto records in the University Settlement House fonds (fonds 1024, series 658); and, Department of Public Welfare records in the Former City of Toronto fonds (fonds 200).
Name Access
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau
Jewish Community Centre Association
Young Men's-Young Women's Hebrew Athletic Association (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Jewish Old Folks Home (Toronto, Ont.)
United Jewish Welfare Fund (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (subject)
Wilensky, Dora, 1902-1959
Subjects
Charities
Children
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See also: Jewish Child Welfare Association fonds (fonds 86); Jewish Family and Child Services fonds (fonds 79); Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds (fonds 66); and, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds (fonds 67).
Arrangement
Records relating to programs, committees and liaison with other organizations that continued after the formation of JF & CS are arranged with that fonds.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 66
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
66
Material Format
textual record
object
Date
1917-1939
Physical Description
49 cm of textual records
1 ruler : 6 in.
Admin History/Bio
For many years prior to 1917 Toronto Jewish community leaders had recognized the need to centralize fund-raising for all local Jewish charities. The 1912 creation of the Associated Hebrew Charities was a partial improvement, but it proved unable to cope with the pre-war rapid growth in immigration, the effects of the 1916 economic recession, and the funding requirements of many still-unaffiliated agencies. The positive experiences of newly established Jewish community federations in several American cities did, however, offer a better example for Toronto, where prominent Jewish leaders Edmund Scheuer, Abraham Cohen, and Ida Seigel provided the leadership that finally did result in the establishment of a Toronto federation.
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was chartered as a charitable organization under the laws of Ontario in September 1917. Its central goal was to end the frequent, uncontrolled, and competitive fund soliciting by a wide range of individual Toronto Jewish philanthropic and social service institutions and instead substitute a single coordinated city-wide community fundraising effort. This would ensure adequate and accountable funding for all its affiliated organizations and agencies in Toronto.
Original affiliated agencies of the FJPT were: the Ladies Co-operative Board, the Jewish Orphans' Home, the Jewish Girls Club, the Junior Council of Jewish Women, the Hebrew Ladies Maternity Aid and Sewing Circle, the Hebrew Young Ladies Boot and Shoe Society, the Jewish Branch of the Big Brotherhood Movement, the Hebrew Free Loan Society, the Jewish Dispensary, and the Hebrew Burial Society.
The original officers were: President Edmund Scheuer, 1st Vice-President Joseph Singer, 2nd Vice-President Jay J. Allen, 3rd Vice-President Moses Gelber, 4th Vice-President Charles Draimin, Treasurer Eli Pullan, and Honorary Secretary Abraham Cohen. A board of trustees consisting of 45 members was also constituted, one-third of whose members were to be replaced each year.
Final decision powers of the federation were originally vested in the board, which met monthly and was responsible for funds distribution and the nomination of officers of the federation. The board also had the power to change, by a two-third vote, any federation by-laws, rules, or regulations. The president chaired all board meetings and had, along with the treasurer, signing authority for orders and cheques. In his absence, the president's responsibilities were transferred to the 1st, or other vice-presidents, in order. The treasurer was responsible for receiving all donations and depositing them in the bank. He also had signing authority for disbursals.
A system of committees was also established in order to deal with individual issues such as annual meetings, fund-raising, budgets, day-to-day administration, and policy, constitutional, and regulation changes. Recommendations from these committees were sent to an executive committee. When vetted, they were then forwarded to the board of trustees for final approval. By 1924, a new position of executive director was added to the list of officers in order to provide better management of the FJPT administration and to head up the executive committee. Also, by this time, six further agencies had become affiliated. These were: Mount Sinai Hospital, the Jewish Boys' and Girls' Camps, Jewish Big Sisters, the Family Welfare Bureau, the Federation Health Clinic, and the Federation Employment Bureau.
The first office of the FJPT was at 206 Beverly Street, but by 1924 it was headquartered at 218 Simcoe Street and by 1928 it had moved to 179 Beverley Street, which was renamed Scheuer House after the FJPT's first president.
The 1929 onset of the Great Depression created unprecedented and ever-growing service and monetary demands on the FJPT. Unable to cope, a major change was urgently required. In 1938 the FJPT was thus absorbed into a new and larger organization with an expanded mission and reorganized fund-raising operations, the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Although the FJPT was absorbed into the UJWF in 1938, meetings of the FJPT Board of Management (responsible for funds redistribution to the FJPT's affiliated agencies) continued to January, 1939 when these responsibilities were finally transferred to the UJWF.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the incorporation, public reporting, planning, financial, administration and operational records of the FJPT. Included are: the incorporation certificate, committee meeting agendas and minutes, correspondence, budgets, annual reports and special reports. FJPT operational records document fund-raising, fund re-distribution and ongoing dialogues with member agencies. Records of specialized, short-lived committees document specific subjects such as salaries, a new community centre, funding of camps, and policies concerning the future of the organization are also included.
Series within this fonds are; 1. Incorporation, 2. Annual Meetings, 3. Annual Reports, 4. Board of Trustees, 5. Constitution Committee, 6. Executive Committee, 7. Budget Committee, 8. Sub-Committee Studying Salaries, 9. Policy Study Committee, 10. Fund-raising Campaign, 11. Federation and Camp Representative Group, 12. Committee on the Community Centre, and 13. Board of Management.
Name Access
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Related Material
For records of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, successor to the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, see Fonds 67.
Creator
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto (1917-1939)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
Series
Fonds
66
Series
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1918-1922, 1935-1936
Physical Description
2 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Under the original articles of the FJPT, an annual meeting was to be held in March or April each year, commencing with 1918. The main business of such meetings was the submission of a full report on the previous year's activities, and also to hold the election of a new group of 15 Trustees to replace those 15 which were retiring. Forty members were necessary to constitute a quorum of annual meetings.
Scope and Content
Series consists of the minutes of the annual meetings of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies from 1918 to 1920 and for the 1935-1936 year. Also included are minutes of a special meeting in 1935 and general meetings in 1918 and 1922.
Related Material
See Fonds 67, Series 1 for minutes of the annual meetings of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual reports series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual reports series
Level
Series
Fonds
66
Series
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1917-1929
Physical Description
4 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
From the beginning of its operation, the FJPT distributed an annual report. Although originally titled an "Annual Statement", it was meant to inform the community about its funding activities and organizational changes resulting from its annual meeting. Its central component, the alphabetical donor lists, was however seen by Toronto Jewish residents as a way of publicly lauding the generosity of donors while by implication shaming those community residents who were not contributing.
Scope and Content
Series consists of the published annual reports of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. Only four of these publications are still extant; 1917-1918, 1918-1919, 1924-1925, and 1929. Reports contain lists of officers, managers and trustees as well as the names and descriptions of affiliated organizations receiving funds. Information about new by-laws, rules and internal organizational changes are also found here. The largest component of each report was always an alphabetical list of individual and corporate donors, showing how much each contributed.
Of special note are the descriptions of the various charitable organizations supported by the FJPT. Reports from some, but not all, years also contain donor addresses. In several cases these annual reports may be the sole source for information about these early Jewish community charities.
Related Material
See fonds 67, Series 2 for Annual Reports of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, successor to the FJPT.
Arrangement
The files are arranged in chronological order.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Board of Trustees series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Board of Trustees series
Level
Series
Fonds
66
Series
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1918?]-1936
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The original FJPT Board of Trustees membership was set at 45, with 15 serving at a time and a 15 being replaced annually. With the passage of time, and especially after 1929, new Board members became harder to find, while remaining members rarely attended the occasional scheduled meetings. By the early 1930's finding a quorum became virtually impossible and a 12 member Board of Management reporting to the Executive Committee was constituted to assume the responsibilities of the Board of Trustees. A small nominating sub-committee was utilized to select members of the Board of Trustees.
Scope and Content
Series consists of two sub-series. Sub-series 1 contains minutes, correspondence and reports of meeting of the Board from 1919 to 1925. Sub-series 2 contains Minutes of the Nominations Sub-committee of the Board from 1935 and 1936.
Related Material
For records of meetings of the FJPT Board of Management, see Fonds 66, Series 1.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Board of Trustees series
Meeting minutes sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Board of Trustees series
Meeting minutes sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
66
Series
4-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1918?]-1925
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of the minutes of meetings of the Board of Trustees of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. Some files may also include related correspondence and reports. Of special note is a report in file 2 detailing the response of the Toronto Jewish Community to the "Jewish needy" made sick by the deadly 1919-1920 influenza epidemic.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Executive Committee series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Executive Committee series
Level
Series
Fonds
66
Series
6
Material Format
textual record
Date
1918-1924
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Executive Committee of the FJPT was the original management team responsible for the ongoing operations of the organization. It consisted of the officers of the FJPT; the Honorary President, the President (who acted as Committee Chair), all four Vice-Presidents, the Treasurer, the Honorary Secretary, and the Executive Director. Regular meetings were held monthly, but occasional special meetings were sometimes called to deal with emergencies or special events. All of its policy and procedures recommendations were passed to the Board of Trustees for final approval. Edmund Scheuer was its first Chair and remained on the Committee as Honorary President throughout the 1920s.
Although this committee was established in 1918 and existed until at least 1934, no meeting minutes remain from the years between 1924 and 1937.
Scope and Content
Series consists of meeting minutes of the Executive Committee of the FJPT.
Related Material
See Fonds 67, Series 5 for records of the Executive Committee of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Executive Committee series
Meeting Minutes sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 66; Series 6-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Executive Committee series
Meeting Minutes sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
66
Series
6-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1918-1924
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of minutes of meetings of the Executive Committee of the FJPT.
Related Material
For meeting minutes records of the successor organization, see Fonds 67, Series 5-1, meeting minutes of the Executive Committee of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual Reports series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 66; Series 3; File 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual Reports series
Level
File
Fonds
66
Series
3
File
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
1924-1925
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of two copies of the eighth Annual Report of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual Reports series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 66; Series 3; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual Reports series
Level
File
Fonds
66
Series
3
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
1929
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of two copies of the thirteenth Annual Report of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.
Related Material
Records of the Annual Reports of the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found in Fonds 67, Series 2.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 66; Series 2; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
File
Fonds
66
Series
2
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1918-1920
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of minutes of the annual meetings of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.
Related Material
See Fonds 67, Series 1 for minutes of the annual meetings of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 66; Series 2; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds
Annual, Special and General Meeting minutes series
Level
File
Fonds
66
Series
2
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1921
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of minutes of two special meetings of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies.
Related Material
See Fonds 67, Series 1 for minutes of the annual meetings of the United Jewish Welfare Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
2021 records – page 1 of 41.

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