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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
1990-12-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-12-8
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 10 x 8 cm and 2 x 4 cm
Date
[ca. 1912]-[ca.1945]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of a copy negative of Joseph and Annie Levine and Family, Toronto, ca. 1912 and one mounted photograph of Manny Pullan in RCAF uniform, early 1940s.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1982-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1982-8-3
Material Format
object
textual record
Physical Description
4 plaques
1 folder of textual records
Date
1966-1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a four plaques awarded to Sarah Levine including a 94th birthday plaque from the Government of Ontario (1970); a 100th birthday plaque from the Government of Ontario (1976); a 90th birthday plaque from Baycrest (1966); a life membership plaque from Baycrest (1973); and 3 congratulatory telegrams honouring the occasion of her 94th birthday in 1970.
Name Access
Levine, Sarah
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1997-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1997-4-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
50 photographs : b&w and col. (24 negatives)
Date
1916-1988
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and newspaper clippings documenting the life of the Levine Family. Photographs include class pictures from Port Whitby's Brock School, Purim celebrations at Oshawa's Beth Zion Synagogue, Camp Ogama staff and camper photos, Camp Winnibagoe cabin photos and Royal Winter Fair prize winning photos.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Camp counselors
Camps
Farms
Farm tractors
Purim
Name Access
Camp Winnebagoe
Places
Oshawa (Ont.)
Whitby (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-39
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-39
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1945-1949
Scope and Content
The records include 23 case files documenting orphans who survived the Holocaust. They were all inmates of the orphanage in Otwoc, Poland. The case files were likely sent to a Jewish organization in Toronto who found local sponsors to support the individual orphans. At the bottom of each case file includes the name of the Toronto sponsors, which ranged from individuals to labour unions and women's auxiliaries. The file also includes English translations for each file (since the information is all in Polish), along with thank you letters from the children to their sponsors written in Yiddish. Photographs of the children are attached to the case files.
Custodial History
The case files had been in the custody of Estelle Tambak, a Harlem, New York teacher and activist who had travelled to Poland to volunteer at the orphanage in the late 1940s. All translation work was done by Ann Szedlecki (1925-2005), a Holocaust survivor from Lodz who had herself been orphaned after the war. This custodial history has been confirmed by Miriam Borden, the granddaughter of Ann Szedlecki, who has a photograph depicting Ann and Estelle viewing the records within this file.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1982-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1982-2-3
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 key
Date
1921
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a gold key presented on 18 September 1921 to Fred and Sophie Torno at the opening of the Eastern Children of Israel Congregation, popularly known as the Berkeley Street Synagogue.
Descriptive Notes
B'nai Israel Hamizrachim.
MG_RG
MG 3 A 43
Subjects
Synagogues
Name Access
Eastern Children of Israel Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Berkeley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-4-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Date
22 May 1948
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a scanned photograph of a group of children in Cornwall, taken May 22, 1948. The children are identified on the photograph: Eunice Shulman, Joan Horovitz, Evelyn Smolkin, Barbara-Ann Horovitz, Sydney Horovitz, Jack Miller, Cynthia Nyman, Avrona Miller, and Jack Horovitz.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-6
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 41 x 51 cm
Date
June 1952
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one oversized photograph taken at the 60th birthday party for Michael Garber. The party was at a club in Montreal. Pictured in the photo are (left to right): Samuel Bronfman, Michael Garber and Edward Gelber.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Elfreda and Alec Levine
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
9 Feb. 2017
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Elfreda and Alec Levine
Number
OH 442
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
9 Feb. 2017
Interviewer
Miriam Borden
Total Running Time
OH 422 part 1: 37 min.
OH 422 part 2: 9 min.
Biography
Alec and Elfreda met when they were young teenagers. Elfreda was friends with Alec’s sister and the two would play tennis together. Despite meeting at a young age, Alec and Elfreda did not begin dating until they were in their early twenties. They married in 1958 and subsequently had three children. It was largely on account of their two eldest children that they emigrated. Their eldest son had emigrated first, initially settling in Saskatchewan, while their daughter emigrated shortly thereafter, making a home in the United Kingdom. Their youngest son chose to remain in South Africa.
Following the birth of their granddaughter in Saskatoon, Alec and Elfreda began making regular trips to Canada. As time went on and crime continued to rise in South Africa, Alec and Elfreda’s children started to encourage their parents to move to Canada. This they did in 1999, arriving in Toronto in the cold month of October. While the ice and snow initially made for a new and exciting experience, they quickly got over it.
Arriving in their sixties, Alec and Elfreda initially struggled in their new country, but soon found work and made friends. Making this process somewhat easier was the fact that the two enjoyed exploring the different areas of the city via subway, an activity they keep up to this day. Alec and Elfreda also continue to follow developments in South Africa—in part because one of their sons lives there—but now think of themselves as Canadians.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Levine, Alec
Levine, Elfreda
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Saskatchewan
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:40 Elfreda discusses her family's immigration to South Africa. Her maternal grandparents came to Cape Town from Riga, Latvia via London. Her paternal grandfather came to South Africa in his teens and settled in ?Aliwal North.
02:14 Alec discusses his family's immigration to South Africa. His parents were married in Riga, Latvia. His maternal grandfather came to South Africa. During the period of 1930-1936, he brought his five daughters and their husbands to South Africa.
03:30 Elfreda describes Jewish life in Aliwal North. She explains why the Jewish population declined over time.
05:08 Elfreda recalls travelling by train to cities for holidays and how she and Alec met during holiday.
06:41 Alec describes his Jewish life growing up in Johannesburg.
07:48 Elfreda continues to discuss Jewish life while growing up in a small community.
09:13 Alec and Elfreda discuss Jewish youth groups and camps.
10:35 Elfreda discusses her academic path: two years of nursing in Cape Town and commercial bookkeeping in Johannesburg.
12:13 Alec discusses his career path: architecture for two years then joining the family plumbing business.
13:00 Alec and Elfreda married in 1958.
13:24 Alec describes his limited involvement in politics in South Africa. Their daughter became involved with the African National Congress (ANC) while she attended university.
14:55 Elfreda shares her memories from her childhood. She recalls the impact of apartheid following the rise of the nationalists in 1948.
16:13 Alec and Elfreda discuss having household staff in their homes while growing up and after they were married.
19:50 Elfreda describes a party she held for her family's maid when she retired.
21:17 Alec and Elfreda explain when and why their two older children emigrated from South Africa. Their youngest son remained in South Africa.
22:49 Alec and Elfreda discuss the factors that contributed to their decision to immigrate to Canada.
25:13 Alec describes some incidents of violence he personally experienced in Johannesburg.
25:58 Alec and Elfreda describe their feeling about leaving South Africa and the challenges of immigrating at a later stage of life (e.g. upgrading their work skills, finding work, making new friends).
28:33 Alec and Elfreda share some of their earliest memories of moving to Canada.
30:35 Alec discusses his early efforts to find work in Canada.
33:52 Elfreda discusses her involvement with the Jewish community, notably the South African Jewish community since their arrival in Canada.
35:49 Elfreda discusses how their willingness to explore Toronto has helped with their integration.
Part 2:
00:34 Alec and Elfreda describe the response from family and friends in South Africa to their decision to leave.
02:25 Alec and Elfreda came to Canada in October 1999. Their son, Mark, came in 1986.
02:50 Alec and Elfreda discuss the easier experience of integration by their son's family compared to their own.
03:49 Elfreda relates a family story. Mark settled in a small town in Saskatchewan when he arrived in Canada. He discovered that relatives of Elfreda had settled in a small neighbouring community in 1906.
5:00 Elfreda discusses their identity as Canadians.
Elfreda discusses their ongoing connections with South Africa.
07:30 Elfreda notes that they did not experience culture shock as they settled in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

Not the Way to Live

Afrikaners Dominated Politics

Leaving your Heart in South Africa

Name
Harvey Brownstone and Howard Levine
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
18 Oct. 2019
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Harvey Brownstone and Howard Levine
Number
OH 451
Subject
AIDS (Disease)
Homophobia
Judaism--Relations--Christianity
Same-sex marriage
Sexual minorities
Social movements
Synagogues
Interview Date
18 Oct. 2019
Interviewer
Michael Friesen
Total Running Time
1 hr. 18 min.
Notes
Associated material: Records of Chutzpah are located in the ArQuives: Canada's LGBTQ2+ Archives.
General note: The OJA has a copy of Harvey Brownstone's article "I Now Pronounce You Wife and Wife," which was originally published in the fall 2014 edition of Reform Judaism Magazine. The article mentions Chutzpah and may be of interest to researchers.
Use Restrictions
See administrative notes.
Biography
Harvey Brownstone was born on 24 July 1956 in Paris, France and raised in Hamilton, Ontario. His father was a social worker who worked at the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre for thirty-five years and was director for twenty-one years (from 1967–1988). Brownstone obtained his LLB degree from Queen's University and was appointed a provincial judge with the Ontario Court of Justice in 1995. He was the first openly gay judge appointed in Canada. He resides in Toronto.
Howard Levine was born in Toronto on 29 June 1947. He earned his bachelor of arts (political science with urban planning) from the University of Waterloo and his master in environmental studies (urban planning and public transportation) from York University. From 1973 to 1975, he worked as a consultant with Peat, Marwick and Partners. From 1976 to 1982, he worked as an area and general planner with the City of Toronto's Planning and Development Department. From 1982 to 1988, he was sole proprietor of HJL Consulting. From 1988 to 1994, he served as councillor for Ward 14. After serving his second term as city councillor, Levine returned to HJL Consulting.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Bolton, Elizabeth
Brownstone, Harvey, 1956-
Canadian Jewish Congress
Canadian Jewish News
Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives
Casey House (Toronto, Ont.)
Cecil Community Centre (Toronto, Ont.)
Church of the Holy Trinity (Toronto, Ont.)
Chutzpah (Toronto, Ont.)
Congregation B'nai Kehillah of Toronto
Eggleton, Art, 1943-
Farber, Bernie
Hamilton JCC
Hawkes, Brent, 1950-
Hudson, Rock, 1925-1985
Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, Ont.)
Keshet Shalom (Toronto, Ont.)
Levine, Howard, 1947-
Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Primrose Club (Toronto, Ont.)
Queen's University (Kingston, Ont.)
Robinson, Svend, 1952-
Royal Ontario Museum
Slater, Ruth
Temple Emanu-El (Toronto, Ont.)
World Congress of Gay & Lesbian Jewish Organizations
York University (Toronto, Ont.)
Geographic Access
Amsterdam (Netherlands)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Kingston (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Waterloo (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
0:00.20 Harvey Brownstone and Howard Levine introduce themselves.
0:00:27 Harvey discusses what it was like coming of age as a gay Jewish man in Ontario. Harvey grew up in Hamilton, Ontario, where his father was the director of the Hamilton JCC. His mother had a French-imported ladies' wear store. After coming out to his parents in the 1970s, he moved to Kingston, Ontario, where he attended Queen's University.
0:03:13 Howard discusses how his experience was different. He was born and raised in downtown Toronto. His father died when he was a teenager; his mother got sick soon after. As a result, Harvey was largely on his own. He went off to Waterloo for university and then York for graduate school. It's around that time he came to terms with who he was.
0:05:05 Howard discusses a gay Jewish group, B'nai Kehillah, that existed before Chutzpah. It met at the Church of the Holy Trinity, an Anglican church in Toronto.
0:06:19 Harvey and Howard discuss what Chutzpah was, when it started, and how they became involved.
0:09:40 Harvey discusses a trip Chutzpah took to the Royal Ontario Museum, where the Dead Sea Scrolls were being exhibited. It was on this trip that Harvey "really met" Howard.
0:10:10 Harvey discusses how he and Howard came to the conclusion that Chutzpah could be more than "just a place to meet."
0:11:11 Harvey discusses the impact the AIDS epidemic had on Chutzpah's focus. Harvey explains that after American Actor Rock Hudson's death, AIDS was front page news in big cities like Toronto.
0:12:03 Harvey discusses the decision to have Friday night Oneg Shabbats in the late 1980s. Initially, these were held at the Cecil Community Centre on Cecil Street in Toronto. Howard used his position as city councillor to make this happen.
0:13:14 Harvey discusses why the Cecil Community Centre was not an ideal location for the group's services. Howard, therefore, approached the Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre and got the group a room for Friday nights.
0:14:52 Harvey discusses Chutzpah’s decision to join the World Congress of Gay & Lesbian Jewish Organization (today, World Congress of GLBT Jews).
0:15:40 Harvey discusses the group's decision to attend a World Congress of Gay & Lesbian Jewish Organizations conference in Amsterdam.
0:17:40 Harvey relates an event hosted by the then mayor of Amsterdam, in which the mayor laid a wreath with a pink triangle to honour gay victims of the Holocaust. Harvey and Howard discuss being moved by this.
0:18:50 Harvey mentions some of the things that came out of the Amsterdam conference.
0:20:05 Harvey and Howard discuss Chutzpah's decision to host a conference in Toronto. The conference, which took place in 1990, was held at the Primrose Hotel.
0:23:16 Harvey and Howard discuss the decision to invite Svend Robinson, Canada's first openly-gay member of parliament, to speak at the conference.
0:23:38 Howard interjects to explain that he was never "out" while on city council. Despite this, he "did a number of things," including getting benefits for same-sex couples and proclaiming Pride Day in Toronto. Howard notes that Art Eggleton, Toronto's mayor at the time, was opposed to proclaiming Pride Day.
0:24:37 Harvey and Howard discuss the Toronto conference some more. Harvey discusses a group of five women cantors who performed at the banquet. The group included Elizabeth Bolton, a cantor at Temple Emanu-El, and Ruth Slater, a cantor at Temple Anshe Sholom.
0:26:50 Harvey and Howard discuss the lack of press coverage for the conference. An exception was the Canadian Jewish News.
0:28:30 Harvey and Howard discuss some of Chutzpah's other initiatives: having a booth at Pride, selling corned beef sandwiches to raise money, and selling rainbow yarmulkes. The group also marched in Pride with a banner.
0:28:56 Harvey discusses Chutzpah's support for Pflag (Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays). He notes that many gay Jews found the most traumatic part of coming out to be the issue of the parents.
0:29:48 Harvey and Howard discuss the mainstream Jewish community's response to the AIDS crisis. Howard says it was in denial. He also discusses his involvement with the Canadian Jewish Congress' Community Relations Committee and Bernie Farber inviting him to join the committee.
0:31:15 Howard discusses how things have changed. He says Chutzpah dissolved because it wasn't needed anymore.
0:32:55 Harvey expands on Howard's point that there was no more need for Chutzpah.
0:33:30 Harvey and Howard clarify Chutzpah's timeline: Harvey joined the group in the mid-1980s. It lasted until the mid-1990s. At that point, it transformed into Keshet Shalom. That group became defunct in the early 2000s. That's when Howard donated his records to the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives (now the ArQuives).
0:34:14 Harvey and Howard discuss how they never agreed that Chutzpah should have become Keshet Shalom (a congregation). They discuss their reasons for not wanting to be a congregation.
0:35:43 Harvey and Howard discuss how many members Chutzpah had at its peak.
0:36:11 Harvey and Howard discuss Chutzpah's relationship with the Metropolitan Community Church of Toronto and Brent Hawkes, one of the church's pastors. They also discuss an unnamed member of the church, a reverend, who identified as both Jewish and Christian and who attended several of Chutzpah's Friday night services.
0:39:28 Harvey and Howard discuss the lack of antisemitism they encountered in non-Jewish gay and lesbian communities.
0:40:28 Harvey and Howard discuss the presence (or lack thereof) of Chutzpah ads in the Jewish press. They note that the Canadian Jewish News did cover the Toronto conference.
0:41:59 Harvey and Howard discuss issues facing the Jewish LGBT community in 2019. Harvey mentions the ultra-Orthodox (Haredi) community as one area of concern. He also discusses elevated rates of suicide among gay youth.
0:45:56 Howard discusses the isolation of gay and lesbian Hasids.
0:46:22 Howard discusses the viewpoint of Toronto's established Jewish community today.
0:47:34 Harvey and Howard share their final thoughts.
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2010-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm and 13 x 21 cm
Date
1925-[194-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs of Bernstein family members. One documents a women's meeting at a home on 678 Crawford Street. Second from left is Esther (Ettie) Bernstein and beside her is Eva Norris. The other photograph is labelled: Organization Meeting of the United Jewish Farmers of Ontario, Holy Blossom Synagogue, March 25, 1925. This photograph has a number of individuals identified on it, including: Dr. Brickner, Hon. Pres.; S. Samuels, Vice Pres.; H. Shackman, Treas.; M. Berman, Executive; S. Levine, Secty; M. Borinsky, Executive; J. Smith, Executive; M. Borenstein, Executive. A member of the donor's family started to identify individuals by marking the photograph with pen. These include Moishe Yukel Bernstein (the donor's great-grandfather), Isadore Bernstein (his grandfather), Tom White, Alta Crystal, Mr. Samuels, Mr. Krupinsky & Saul Crystal.
Subjects
Farmers
Places
Crawford Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1909-1939
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records that document Sam's involvement in the Russian army and his immigration to Canada. Included is a copy of his naturalization certificate (1919), a JIAS shipping receipt for a package sent to Russia (1939), Russian army documents, and a temporary Russian passport (1914).
Administrative History
Sam Levine was born in Postov, Vilna, Russia on April 10th, 1885 to Mr. and Mrs. Eliahu Levine. Prior to immigrating to Canada, he received training as a blacksmith in the Russian army and had two daughters with his wife Sarah (d. 1968): Bessie (b. 1909) and Betty (b. 1913). His wife and daughters joined him in Canada around 1921; a year after he became a naturalized Canadian. After their arrival, Sam and his wife had two more daughters: Ethel (b. 1922) and Sylvia (b. 1924).
The Levine family resided at 11 Euclid and owned a stable at 22 Euclid, which Sam used as a place to shoe horses for profit. Throughout his career, Sam took on various metal work jobs, including building gates for residences and cemeteries, such as Roselawn Lambton. He often did the metal work at home and soldered the completed pieces together on site. During the Second World War, Sam had a contract with Lincoln Electric to build casings for motors.
Sam was part of the Grand Order of Israel and Sarah was a member of Folks Farein. Sam taught himself how to read English, and regularly frequented horse races. Sam passed away in 1976.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: some documents are in Russian and Yiddish
Related material note: see also accession #1988-11-12.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-9-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-9-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 9 cm
Date
[between 1960 and 1962]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of the sign from the Eastern Children of Israel Congregation, located on Parliament Street, just north of Shuter Street, in Toronto. The sign is in the shape of an arc and was situated on the second floor of a brick building between two windows. It was written in Hebrew and mentions both the synagogue and a Talmud Torah.
Custodial History
The photograph was in the possession of Dr. Dorothy Pullan. She mailed it to the OJA in September 2011.
Administrative History
The Eastern Children of Israel Synagogue (Bnai Israel Hamizrachim or Eastern Children's Congregation) was founded in a house on Berkeley Street before the First World War. Its first synagogue was built at 177-179 Berkeley Street and officially opened in 1918. A Talmud Torah was later added onto the back. The synagogue was bulldozed in 1960 to make way for the Moss Park housing project, although the land sat vacant until 1962. The synagogue subsequently moved to 270 Parliament street until 1962, just north of Shuter Street, but is no longer in existence.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Also available as a JPEG file.
Subjects
Signs and signboards
Synagogues
Name Access
Eastern Children of Israel Congregation (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Parliament Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of textual and graphic material
Date
[1979?]-[ca. 2007], predominant 1992-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the governance, operation, and programs of the Hillel Children's Workshop. Included are meeting minutes, correspondence, policy documents, programming records, newsletters, mission statements, financial records, course outlines, class lists and teacher handbooks. Also included are photographs of special events, such as Chanukah, Purim, and Sukkot parties.
Administrative History
Established in 1974, the Hillel Children's Workshop was a cooperative Jewish Sunday school that ran programs for both parents and children. The curriculum was focused on Jewish humanist principles and based on Biblical and secular sources. As a cooperative group, parents were actively involved in the organization. In 2012, the school closed due to decreased enrolment.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-16
Material Format
moving images
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 document (electronic)
4 DVDs
1 scrapbook
Date
1988-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material relating to the Maccabees Royal Canadian Legion branch 343, including a 1998 membership register, poppy sale information, correspondence and notes regarding Ben Sussman's application for a lifetime membership, information about the ticket sales and a copy of the certificate from 1997 JNF tribute dinner that honoured Albert and Pearl Cohen, and planning notes for the 50th anniversary banquet of the Maccabees in 1995. The accession also contains the draft of Albert Cohen's speech that he presented at the 50th anniversary dinner, as well as newspaper clippings from the Hamilton Jewish News and the Canadian Jewish News relating to the Maccabees, two certificates from the Grand Order of Israel Benefit Society recognizing Albert Cohen's 40 years of membership and an award of merit, and a eulogy in Yiddish, with some translation, written by a father about the son he lost, Balinson, in the line of duty. The DVDs contain footage from the 1997 JNF dinner honouring the Cohens, including Pearl Cohen speaking about early Hamilton, one clip from 1994 of Albert Cohen telling the history of the Maccabees, and video from the 50th anniversary dinner of the Maccabees where there were various speakers including an address by the guest speaker, Commander Sam Pasternack, who spoke about the contribution of Jewish soldiers in WWII (DVD, Maccabees dinner part 3).
Custodial History
Michael Cohen is the son of Albert and Pearl Cohen, and was in possession of the records prior to donating them.
Administrative History
Albert Cohen (1918-2006) who also went by the nickname "Boomie," was born on November 12, 1918 in Hamilton, Ontario. Pearl Cohen (nee Chaunce) (1919-2008) was born in Hamilton on September 2, 1919. Albert and Pearl married in 1941. In the same year, Albert volunteered to serve in the army as a staff sargeant stationed in Hamilton. He was later discharged in May 1946 after the war. Albert then joined Hamilton's Maccabees, Branch 343 of the Royal Canadian Legion. The branch was founded in 1947 and had a membership of 150 people. The Maccabees' membership was made up of Jewish veterans of WWII, and some veterans of WWI. The branch held meetings in Hamilton's Jewish centre. Albert served as president of the branch for almost 20 years, from 1975 to around 2000. The Maccabees were quite active, and helped raise money by selling poppies for Remembrance Day. The money raised would be sent to general hospitals, veterans hospitals, and families of needy veterans. Albert passed away on August 7, 2006, and Pearl passed away April 18, 2008.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Cohen, Albert, 1918-2006
Cohen, Pearl, 1919-2008
Places
Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-9-1
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 folder of textual records (PDF, Word)
Date
9 Feb. 2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a eulogy for Michael Maister written by his son Jonathan Maister.
Name Access
Maister, Jonathan
Maister, Michael
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tiff)
Date
[between 1914 and 1916?], 1986-1998
Scope and Content
Accssion consists of photographs documenting the Levine family's immigration to Canada and activities in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Included are images of Mark and Bev during their first few years in Melford, Saskatchewan, family holiday celebrations (Chanukah and Pesach dinners), shabbat dinners, the Edenbridge synagogue, trips to Niagara Falls, and images taken during trips Elfreda and Alec made to Canada from South Africa to visit Mark. Of note are images taken of Mark and Bev with other South African immigrants at a ski hill in Saskatchewan and at shabbat dinners in Melford. Also included is a Sweiden family portrait taken in South Africa in the early 1900s.
Administrative History
Leible and Esther Sweiden moved from Lithuania to Capetown in 1890. Leible's brother, Jacob followed him to Capetown around 1902. In 1906, Jacob and his wife Fanny (nee Vickers) immigrated with a small group of other Jewish South Africans to Edenbridge, Saskatchewan. Leible remained in South Africa. Leible's son Israel married Edith (Eadie) in 1934. Israel and Edith's daughter Elfreda (b. 1936) married Alec Levine in 1958. Elfreda was a bookkeeper for various companies and Alec worked for his family's plumbing business. They had three children together: Mark (b. 1959), Carol (b. 1962), and Adrian ( b. 1966).
Mark Levine married Beverley in 1983. They immigrated to Melford, Saskatchewan in 1986. Mark did not know at the time that his great grandfather's brother had immigrated to a nearby area decades earlier and only learned of his story and the Edenbridge Jewish community soon after arriving there. Mark worked as a physician at a local hospital. Beverley had been a pharmacist in South Africa, however, her qualifications were not recognized in Canada and she focused on raising her family. Mark and Bev's daughter, Romi, was born in August 1987. After 18 months in Melford, they moved to Toronto after Mark found work as a pediatric anesiologist at Sick Kids Hospital. In 1998, thier second daughter, Jade, was born. Mark's parents, Elfreda and Alec, immigrated to Toronto in 1999. Mark and other relatives encouraged them to immigrate due to the increasingly dangerous political situation in South Africa. Mark is also an assoicate professor at the University of Toronto. Alec and Elfreda's daughter Carol lives in England and their son Adrian remains in South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Levine, Mark
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w (jpg)
4 documents (jpg)
Date
[195-?]-1979
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six electronic copies of photographs of Irving Levine and the Levine family and electronic copies of three invitations to Irving Levine's birthday party, and one newspaper clipping. Included is Irving and Ruth's wedding portrait and wedding photo with their parents (Sept. 6, 1952), two photographs of Irving with his mother Anne at Cyrstal Beach, a photograph of the Irving brothers in Grimsby, and a photo of Irving with business partner Lionel Robins (ca. 1978). Identified individuals in the photographs include: Irving Levine, Lionel Robins, Harry Levine, David Levine, Anne Levine, Ruth Levine, Sam Levine, Abraham Feldman, and Jennie Feldman.
Administrative History
Irving Levine was born in 1929 to Sam and Anne Levine. He was born in Grimsby, Ontario, where his father owned a junior department store. They were members of Beth Jacob Synagogue in Hamilton. Irving moved to Toronto in 1953, he married Ruth Fern in 1952 and they had three children: Alan, born in 1953, Suzy, born in 1956 and Michael, born in 1961. He has six grandchildren. He purchased Braemar clothing store in the early 1960s, with the first location in Cloverdale Mall. He became the top vice-president of Dylex, Ltd.,one of Canada's largest retail clothing companies, and general manager of Fairweather's division. Lionel Robins became his business partner in 1964.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Further identification can be found with the accession record.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Levine, Irving, 1929-
Places
Crystal Beach (Fort Erie, Ont.)
Grimsby (Ont.)
Hamilton (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-8-10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
moving images (electronic)
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records
2240 photographs (jpg and gif)
8 moving images
Date
1944-2015 (predominent 2008-2015)
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the activities of Alex Levin, a Jewish war veteran and Holocaust survivor. Records include letters written to Levin from school children following various speaking engagements; interviews with Crestwood School, CHAT, and Netivot Hatorah; a recording of the Saluting Our Italian Heroes commemorative event; recordings of Remembrance Day ceremonies hosted by the Canadian Jewish War Veterans (Toronto Post); and photographs documenting events attended by Levin including Holocaust remembrance events, Yom Hashoah, Remembrance Day ceremonies, March of the Living, Miracle Dinners and Proms, Azrieli Foundation events including the launch of Levin's book "Under the Yellow and Red Stars", school visits, JWV programs with Sunnybrook veterans, portraits of Levin through the years and various scanned images of Levin's family.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. In 1941, the Germans invaded Rokitno and established a ghetto and formed a Judenrat to carry out their orders. In 1942, the Ghetto was evacuated and the Jews were brought to the town's marketplace to be transported by train to be killed. Levin was ten years old when he escaped into the nearby forest with his brother Samuel where he lived for 18 months in a hole in the ground. He was twelve when he emerged from hiding to find that his parents and youngest brother Moishe had been murdered. In 1944, he joined the Soviet forces as a messenger boy. After the war, he was sent to the USSR and enrolled in cadet school, remaining in the Soviet army until forced out for being Jewish in the 1970s. An engineer by training, Alex came to Canada in 1975 via Austria and Italy, and now lives in Toronto where he regularly speaks about his experiences in the Holocaust.
Subjects
Education
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-2016
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-6
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2010?]-[2015?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of thank you cards from schools where Alex was a speaker, sharing his story of Holocaust survival.
Administrative History
Alex Levin (1932-2016) was born Joshua Levin in 1932 in Rokitno, Poland. (He was also known as Yehoshua and Shike.) Rokitno was occupied in 1941 by Nazi Germany and Alex escaped the Rokitno ghetto with his brother in 1942, hiding in the woods for eighteen months. Soviet troops found him in January of 1944 and invited him to join the 13th Army as a field hospital unit helper. Because his Yiddish nickname was unfamiliar (Shike, from his Hebrew name, Yehoshua), they called him Shura or Shurik, diminutive forms of Alexander, which became his formal name. He became an officer in the USSR and an engineer. He immigrated to Canada in 1975 and brought his family to join him in 1980.
Subjects
Education
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
World War, 1939-1945
Antisemitism
Name Access
Levin, Alex, 1932-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph
Date
1941-1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records pertaining to Michael Shulman's father, John Shulman, a Chartered Accountant and active member of Holy Blossom Synagogue. His office was at 21 Dundas Square. Included in the accession are: the naturalization certificate of his maternal grandfather, Louis Bolasny, a founder of the Kiever Synagogue; John Shulman's ketubah for his marriage with Rose Bolasny (scanned and original returned to donor; 1 black and white photo of John Shulman; 3 Holy Blossom Brotherhood Bulletins including an announcement of the First Dinner Meeting of the Council of Jewish Brotherhoods of Toronto held at Beth Tzedec Synagogue on November 15, 1956; photocopied class pictures of Michael Shulman's Kindergarten class at Forest Hill (1945).
Administrative History
Michael Shulman is an active member of the Jewish community. His wife is Jackie Shulman who sits on the board of the Ontario Jewish Archives.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-8-7
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
39 photographs : b&w and col ; 42 x 52 cm or smaller
5 photographs : b&w (TIF)
1 folder of textual records
1 book
Date
1880-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Bernstein, Seskin and Norris families. Among the photos is a photo album belonging to Eva & Srulik Norris, six painted photographic portraits (oval mounted on card with crayon embellishments); one painting, a worn copy of Readings from the Holy Scriptures issued to Sid Bernstein, while serving with the Canadian Armed Forces, Camp Borden, ca. 1943. This bible is an example of those issued to Jewish Sailors, Soldiers and Airmen, published in the United States by Jewish Welfare Board in 1943. This copy was distributed by the Mount Royal Lodge No. 729, B’nai B’rith, and the War Efforts Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, March 1943. In addition there is a Balmoral Hotel business card and a presonal Shana Tova greeting card of the donor's Great Aunt Hinde Bernstein.
The individuals identified in the photographs include: Moshe Yukel Berstein, Isadore Bernstein, Ettie Bernstein, Avram Hersh Bernstein, Brothers Hymie, Izzie, Nathan and Saul Bernstein, Moishe Bernstein, Eva Norris, Srulick Norris, Mattel Sluzewska, Michal Sluzewski, Dave Gruber, Hinda Bernstein, William (Wilhelm) Seskin, Jack Seskin, Sofie Seskin, Anny Kofman, Jennie Seskin, Adolf Seskin, andLeah Bernstein (née Zuber). Locations of the photographs include: Mr. Bernstein's gas station in Haliburton, Ontario; Chez Ami, Buffalo, New York; Shepatovka, Russia; Pontypool, Ontario and Toronto, Ontario.
Custodial History
Michael Bernstein inherited the collection that was formerly in the possession of his grandmother Ettie Bernstein. He also acquired the photogaph album belonging to Eva and Srulick Norris, friends of Ettie's.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material:
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1953
Scope and Content
Accession consists of correspondence from the acting director of the Children's Aid and Infants' Homes of Toronto located at 32 Isabella Street to the executive director of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society located at 145 Beverly Street. The subject of the correspondence concerns a reference for an applicant for the position of investigator in the Protection Department of the Children's Aid and Infants' Homes.
Custodial History
Item was discovered while processing CJC Fonds 17 holdings.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Orphanages
Name Access
Children's Aid and Infants' Homes of Toronto
Places
Beverley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Isabella Street(Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
336 Annette Street
Source
Landmarks

The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
Address
336 Annette Street
Time Period
1922-1935
Scope Note
The Jewish Orphanage was established in 1909 in a rented house in the Ward, later moving to 218 Simcoe St. In 1921 the name was changed to Jewish Childrens' Home, and in 1922 a stately house at 336 Annette St. was purchased, called "Oakland". It had been designed by James Ellis. The house could accommodate 35 children.
History
The children went to local schools and attended Jewish Sunday School, as well as having Bar Mitzvah training. They were provided with clothing and meals, and had the opportunity to enjoy activities taking place within the home, such as cooking and drama. The Home was closed in 1935 due to disagreements between the newly established Jewish Children's Bureau's (JCB) and the Jewish Childrens' Home (JCH) around child welfare policies, as well as a need for the Federation to cut costs.
Category
Social Service
Source
Landmarks
Passenger Names
Blunt, and children
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Blunt, and children
Page Number
328
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Farrar, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Farrar, Michael
Page Number
230
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Kidden, Jos. & Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Kidden, Jos. & Michael
Page Number
319
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Bashe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Bashe
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Chane
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Chane
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Hene
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Hene
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Jos.
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Jos.
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Morris
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Morris
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Sarah
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Sarah
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Sheine, Yite
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levin, Sheine, Yite
Page Number
656
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levine, David & Leib
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levine, David & Leib
Page Number
699
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levine, Shoel
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levine, Shoel
Page Number
672
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Lisoto, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Lisoto, Michael
Page Number
230
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Myzborsky, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Myzborsky, Michael
Page Number
768
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Nickstein, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Nickstein, Michael
Page Number
230
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Oldyroyd, Mrs. & Children
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Oldyroyd, Mrs. & Children
Page Number
753
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Olexy, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Olexy, Michael
Page Number
484
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Pawluk, Michael & Rose
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Pawluk, Michael & Rose
Page Number
338
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Poizner, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Poizner, Michael
Page Number
250
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Poizner, Michael, Leizer,
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Poizner, Michael, Leizer,
Page Number
382
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Scholaptur, Michael & Mary
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Scholaptur, Michael & Mary
Page Number
362
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Shermeter, Michael & Mary
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Shermeter, Michael & Mary
Page Number
335
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Twandofska, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Twandofska, Michael
Page Number
615
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Umbros, Mrs. & Children
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Umbros, Mrs. & Children
Page Number
799
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Ungerman, Shendel & children
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Ungerman, Shendel & children
Page Number
711
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Woiak, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Woiak, Michael
Page Number
395
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Woznick, Michael
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Woznick, Michael
Page Number
472
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
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