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11 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 67
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
67
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1936-1991, predominant 1938-1976
Physical Description
10 m of textual records
5541 photographs, 25 x 20 cm and smaller, and other media
Admin History/Bio
The Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto was incorporated in Ontario in March 1917 to coordinate the fundraising activities of Jewish charitable, philanthropic, and social service agencies in Toronto. In 1918, ten separate agencies were funded by the FJPT. By 1937, fourteen agencies were funded. The Great Depression of the 1930s and the development of several newer Jewish aid, education and medical care organizations created both increased need for resources and growing competition for ever-more scarce dollars. Within a very few years this funding crisis forced a major review of the organization.
During 1936 a series of special meetings of leading individuals were held to examine the income and expenditures of all Toronto Jewish agencies and also to speculate about the need for a new Toronto Jewish "Community Chest" as the sole fund-raising organization for a federation of all Jewish agencies including the FJPT. In 1938, the new United Jewish Welfare Fund was formally constituted. Added to the FJPT's previous list of Toronto client agencies in 1938 were: the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Hebrew National Association, the Jewish Immigrant Aid Association, the Mizrachi Society, the Toronto Free Loan Association, the Geverkshaften, and Old Folks Home, and the United Palestine Appeal, raising the total number of agencies to 22.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, the UJWF's annual fundraising campaign was combined with the CJC's United Palestine appeal to form a new, combined campaign named the United Jewish Appeal (UJA). In 1967, the UJA name was legally changed to the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto.
In mid-1976, the organization's public name was changed to the Toronto Jewish Congress. Although initially thought of as a merger between the UJWF and the CJC, the actual result was the expansion of the UJWF responsibilities to include local education and welfare services previously shared with the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. The UJWF, however, remained the legal senior entity.
In 1991 the public name was again changed to the Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto and in 1999, to UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. By this date, over 30 beneficiary and affiliated agencies, 49 affiliated schools and five Federation departments were fully or partly funded by the UJA Federation.
In June, 2010, the organization altered its legal structure, with the senior legal entity becoming the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 25 series: Annual Meetings, Annual Reports, Board of Directors, Constitution Committee, Executive Committee, Officers Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Administration Committee, Social Planning Committee, Committee on Capital Needs and Planning, Central Committee on Scholarships in Aid, Joint Committee of the BJE and UJWF Study on Jewish Education, Nominations Committee, Pension Fund Committee, Coordinating Committee, Special Ad Hoc and Temporary Committees, Annual Campaign, Client Agencies, Joint Committee of the CJC and the UJWF, Committee on Community Organization, Sub-Committee on Construction and Administration of Community Schools, Joint Committee on Fundraising, Personnel Committee, Community Leadership Development Council, and Israel at Fifty Community Celebration.
Over 4500 photographs and a variety of other media are managed within Series 17, Campaign records.
Notes
For exact details about the contents of individual series and sub-series, please review their scope and contents notes.
Name Access
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto
United Jewish Appeal
Toronto Jewish Congress
Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Subjects
Charities
Fund raising
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For records of the predecessor of the UJWF, see Fonds 66, the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto fonds.
Further detailed documentation of the proposed merger between the UJWF and the CJC (creation of the TJC) may be found in Fonds 67, Sub-sub-series 5-5-1, Files 171 and 221.
Further documentation on the United Jewish Welfare Fund may be found within Fonds 9, Series 7, records of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society.
For further detailed records of a key community leader's involvement with the UJWF see Accession 1982-8-8, the records of Samuel Godfrey, 1943-1972.
Creator
United Jewish Welfare Fund (1938-)
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Level
Series
Fonds
67
Series
17
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1938-2008
Physical Description
2.18 m of textual records and other materials
Admin History/Bio
Superseding the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, the first Annual Campaign of the new United Jewish Welfare Fund took place in 1938. It combined the appeals of 37 organizations into one, eliminating much of the inefficiency and competition of the previous twenty years. Money raised was for agencies and causes new and traditional, local and overseas. Recipients included; the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services, Canadian Jewish Congress, the United Jewish Relief Agencies, the Joint Distribution Committee, and Palestine. In 1938, Campaign could be completed within a mere two weeks and raised $161,000. This figure rose to $348,000 in 1942 and surpassed one million dollars in 1951. When the State of Israel was established in 1948, Campaign was combined with the CJC and the United Palestine appeals into a new, combined campaign and re-named The United Jewish Appeal (UJA).
With different local and world challenges and crises over time, annual campaigns have had a variety of foci: for example, the plight of Displaced Persons in Europe after the Second World War; the 1957 Rescue Campaign for refugees in Russia, Europe and North Africa; the first Emergency Campaign in 1967 in response to the Six Days’ War; and Operation Exodus 1990-1991, which raised funds to aid Soviet Jews.
Early Campaign leadership was provided by lay people. Chairmen of the Campaign Cabinet included Samuel Godfrey, Ben Sadowski, Samuel J. Granatstein, Bernard Vise, Morris S. Till, and Samuel J. Zacks. A small administration committee carried out daily operations, but the bulk of the fundraising work was performed by the Service Council, a group of volunteers who planned, canvassed and evaluated each campaign, as well as organizing educational programs and public meetings. A Women’s Service Council and a Young Peoples’ Service Council also played key fundraising roles.
Canvassing was conducted by volunteers from each professional or trade Division, such as doctors, lawyers, retail sales, etc. The volunteers were responsible for canvassing the members of their own group. A special Women’s Campaign had its own chair, sub-committees and programming. Divisions were further added to reflect the amounts of donations, Top Gifts, and Major Gifts for example. By the 1980s, the Service Councils had given way to professional Campaign Associates employed by UJWF. With further changes to UJWF/UJA Federation’s structure, Campaign first fell under the Financial Resource Development Department, then Integrated Development, and, in 2009, the Centre for Philanthropy. It is now supported by the Donor Relations Management, Donor Research, and Missions/VIP departments which cater to the diverse interests of individual donors.
Through the 1940s and 1950s, face-to-face canvassing was the norm, with donor’s names and gifts published in the UJWF annual report. By the 1960s, an expanding community and a need for efficiency increased the use of the telephone, with regular telethons involving hundreds of volunteers. In 1970, a regular springtime Walk with Israel was included within the rest of Campaign events. In the 21st Century, the internet is used to solicit donations, publicize campaign news and events, and register volunteers for telethons and events like the Walk.
Scope and Content
Series consists of two sub-series, Walk with Israel (sub-series 17-1) and General Campaign Records (sub-series 17-2).
Notes
Physical description note: Includes photographs, videocassettes, posters, DVDs, artfacts and books.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[197?]-2008
Physical Description
1.8 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
UJA Federation’s Walk with Israel was first held in May 1970, when it was called the UJA Walkathon. The first Walk was organized quickly with no advance publicity, yet it still raised $55,000. In the early years, funds raised in the Walk went into UJA’s Israel Special Fund. Since then, the money has supported particular projects in Israel that often involve children, since children are the main fundraisers in the event. The Walk with Israel has grown into the largest event in the Toronto Jewish community, with over 20,000 people participating as volunteers or walkers, and funds raised reaching as high as $400,000. The event has had several name changes since 1970: Walk for Israel (1978-1993); Community March for Israel (1994-1996); Israel Funwalk (1998-2002); and the current name, Walk with Israel.
The Walk with Israel is one of the programs mounted by the Annual Campaign department of UJA Federation. It is planned by a Cabinet Committee, with one or two laypeople as chairs, and numerous sub-committees. The main UJA staff undertaking the planning and execution is the Walk Coordinator. Each year, sub-committees are formed for recruitment, logistics, marketing and public relations, the Festival, food, entertainment, etc. The Walk also involves many outside entities: companies approached for prizes, donations or sponsorship; entertainment groups; the Toronto police force, which provides traffic control, marshalling and a parade permit; city government, for park use permits and outdoor signage; community groups mounting displays; costumed character rental companies; and manufacturers of the t-shirts, hats and buttons produced each year for Walk participants.
In addition to being a major fundraiser, the Walk fashioned itself initially as a fitness challenge to children and athletes, with a route as long as 31 kilometres in 1976. Over the years, this length has been reduced significantly, with the event evolving into a more manageable and family-oriented event. In the last decade, with periods of tension overseas, it has been framed as a demonstration of solidarity with Israel. Alongside the main event, alternative fundraisers such as a large Raffle, Dance-a-thon, Aerob-a-thon and Learn-a-thon for Eitz Chaim day schools, have been held in some years to encourage more people to contribute. Incentives for those who collect sponsors have grown over the years, from free t-shirts to a succession of prizes depending on the amount of funds raised. The grand prize draw for many years was two El Al airline tickets to Israel.
The location of the Walk has moved from the Bathurst Street 'corridor' of the Jewish community, to a downtown route that for some years went through the historic Jewish neighbourhood of Kensington Market and more recently, begins and ends at Coronation Park by the lakeshore and winds around the downtown streets. There is now also a kick-off party at the Walk’s starting point. Since 1984, the Walk has culminated in a big festival, featuring rides, petting zoos, a barbecue, musical entertainment, clowns and other attractions. This was usually held in a park or the BJCC parking lot. When the Walk route moved downtown, the Festival shifted to Ontario Place, and more recently, it has taken place on the CNE grounds by the lakeshore. Since 2007, the Festival has been sponsored by RioCan, and 'yogen fruz' became a major sponsor of the Walk in 2008. Other Walk sponsors have included Roots Canada (supplier of t-shirts), Shopper’s Drug Mart, Henry’s camera centre, Canada Trust, National Bank Financial Group, and the Canadian Zionist Federation.
Scope and Content
Sub-series contains records that document the planning and coordination of the Walk for Israel each year, as well as photographs and other records from the day itself and post-walk evaluation and wrap-up activities. The records include meeting notices, agendas and minutes, information sheets, lists, schedules, sitemaps, correspondence, school presentations, permits, press releases, design work, invoices, flyers, and photographs. Materials distibuted to participants include walker passports that had to be verified at each checkpoint, sponsor books, collection envelopes, tickets and other ephemera.
Most of the records have been arranged by year, broken down by function, in the following order: Walk oversight (the Walk Committee and chairs); recruitment of participants; volunteers; logistics such as route and police/security coverage; publicity and public relations, design of memorabilia (i.e. hats); sponsorship and prizes; financial management; the Walk event itself; the Festival; related fundraisers, particularly the Eitz Chaim Day Schools Learnathon; and post-event evaluation. The Festival records document the planning of food, entertainment, displays, amusements, and volunteers, and include photographs taken on the day of the event.
Sub-series 17-1 also includes individual files containing photographs from ranges of years. These were added to this series after the major portion of the "Walk" records had already been processed.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes ca. 4513 photographs (1948 negatives, 431 jpgs), 8 videocassettes, 4 optical discs (videos), 12 posters, 13 t-shirts, 4 buttons, 2 shoelaces, 1 jacket and several hats.
Reproduction restriction note: Though there is no textual evidence indicating ownership of copyright, it is believed that all rights to the Graphic Artists negatives in this sub-series were transferred to UJA Federation (Communications department), since they were the ultimate possessors of the negatives. Copyright for photographs by Stephen Epstein remains in his possession. Other UJA staff photographs by Eve Marks are the physical and intellectual property of UJA Federation.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
1998 Israel 50 Fun Walk sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
1998 Israel 50 Fun Walk sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-24
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1998
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
For Israel's 50th birthday, the Walk for Israel underwent many dramatic changes. Renamed the "Israel at 50 Fun Walk," the "march as one" style became a more staggered walk again, with a brand new 7.5 kilometre route in downtown Toronto. The new Walk was more high profile and elaborate, starting with opening ceremonies and entertainment at Nathan Phillips Square, then winding through Old Jewish Toronto through two checkpoints and on to Ontario Place, where the Israel at 50 Festival was held. The date of the Walk was Sunday May 24 and its slogan was "Let's Step Together." The chairs were Jeff Cohen, Fran Grundman and Corey Mandell, with the assistance of committee members and Walk staff Silvia Astrug and Naomi Cohen. More than 15,000 people turned out for the day and more than $250,000 were raised.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains textual records, photographs, posters, artifacts (giveaways) and a promotional video from the 1998 Funwalk, the Festival and the Learnathon. The files are arranged by function, in this order: Walk oversight (the Cabinet Committee and chairs), recruitment of participants and staff volunteers, logistics, publicity and design, corporate sponsorship, finances, the Walk event itself, the Festival, related fundraisers, and post-event evaluation and follow-up.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 380 photographs (175 negatives), 4 posters, 2 hats, a t-shirt and 1 videocassette.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 1999 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 1999 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-25
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1999
Physical Description
13 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Israel Funwalk '99, "Let's Step Together," was held on Sunday, May 30, 1999. It was chaired by Harvey Cooperberg, Fran Grundman and Corey Mandell. The UJA staff person was Naomi Cohen. Similar to 1998, the Walk started from Nathan Phillips Square, this year with a big kickoff Carnival there. The route led through Old Jewish Toronto through three checkpoints to the entrance of Ontario Place, where participants could continue on to the Festival. For the first time, there was also a shorter Bub 'n' Zaid-a-thon to encourage multi-generation families to walk together. More than 500 volunteers and approximately 15,000 people participated in the "Funwalk '99", making it the largest turnout the Walk for Israel had ever had.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains textual records, photographs, artifacts (giveaways) and a promotional video from the Israel Funwalk '99, the Festival and the Learnathon. The files are arranged by function, in this order: Walk oversight (the Cabinet Committee and chairs), recruitment of participants and staff volunteers, logistics, entertainment, publicity and design, corporate sponsorship, finances, the Walk event itself, the Festival and related fundraisers.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 467 photographs (394 negatives), 2 hats, 1 t-shirt and 1 videocassette.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 2000 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 2000 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-26
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
The Israel Funwalk 2000 took place on Sunday, May 28, 2000. As in recent years, it began with a "MEGA [Mandell Entertainment Group Amusements] Carnival" at Nathan Phillips Square. That was followed by a route including Old Jewish Toronto, leading to Trinity Bellwoods Park and then south to Ontario Place, where the Funwalk Festival was held. The co-chairs of the Walk were Fran Grundman and Harvey Cooperberg. For the first time, an Entertainment Coordinator was specially named: Corey Mandell, a longtime participant in the planning and entertainment for the Walk. The UJA coordinator was Naomi Cohen. A new feature of the event this year was a 5 kilometre Fun Run for adults with its own attractions and incentives.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a small amount of textual records and 2 videos from the Israel Funwalk 2000 and the Festival. The files are arranged by function, in this order: recruitment of participants, logistics, publicity and design, the Walk event itself and the Festival. One video is a promotional one used for recruitment in schools; the other is a "TV spot" featuring Michael Landsberg on the TSN Sportsdesk, also promoting the Funwalk. The videos feature still photographs from past Walks and information about the route, entertainment, Festival and incentives.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes approximately 390 photographs, 1 t-shirt and 2 videocassettes.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 2001 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Israel Funwalk 2001 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-27
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2001
Physical Description
10 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 2001, the Israel Funwalk was held on Victoria Day Monday, May 21st. The chairs this year were Abe Glowinsky and Elyza Litwin Polsky, and Naomi Cohen was once again the staff coordinator. An adult 7 kilometre Fun Run commenced 15 minutes before the Walk and followed the same route. While the Walk had had a Web presence as early as 1999, 2001 was the first time online registration was offered. The route also changed this year, going south from Nathan Phillips Square to Wellington Street, then west to Blue Jays Way and north to the second checkpoint at Alexandra Park (at Bathurst and Dundas). From there participants proceeded to the third checkpoint at Trinity Bellwoods Park and then south to Ontario Place and the Israel Funwalk Festival.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a small amount of textual records, a promotional video and a purple and white hat from the Israel Funwalk of 2001. The records include a promotional brochure and the organizational material distributed to participants (sponsor sheet, collection envelope and information pamphlet).
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 331 photographs (216 negatives), 1 videocassette (8 mins.), and 1 hat.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2002 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2002 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-28
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2002
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 2002, reacting to the recent wave of violence in Israel, the Walk was renamed the Walk with Israel to underline that it was an act of community solidarity. With a new slogan, "Now. More Than Ever," the Walk was scheduled for May 20, 2002. The money raised went towards helping children affected by the crisis in Israel. The chairs were Abe Glowinsky and Elyza Polsky, with Coordinator Naomi Cohen and Administrator Cindy Bogach. Special guests were Mayor Mel Lastman, Israeli Consul-General Meir Romen and Ra'anin Gissin, key advisor and principal spokesperson for Israeli Prime Minister, Ariel Sharon. Gissin gave the keynote speech at the Festival.
In addition to the usual sub-committees, there was a new one: School Projects. These were artistic menorahs created by each school that were displayed at the Festival. Once again, the 5 kilometre adult Fun Run took place. A new route this year took participants in a loop from the Sky Dome, north and across Nassau/Cecil/Elm streets, then south again on Bay Street to the Sky Dome, where the Festival was held. The Festival featured attractions from MEGA (Mandell Entertainment Group Amusements) such as 'inflatables', as well as an Israeli-style shuk (open air market). A record crowd of almost 25,000 people turned out.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a small amount of textual records, a promotional video and a t-shirt from the Israel Funwalk of 2001. The records include a promotional brochure and the organizational material distributed to participants (sponsor sheet, collection envelope and information pamphlet).
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 890 photographs (747 negatives), 1 videocassette and 1 t-shirt.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2003 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2003 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-29
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2003
Physical Description
10 posters (pdf) and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 2003, the Walk with Israel took place on Sunday, May 25th, featuring a brand new 5 kilometre route from Coronation Park at the lakeshore, around downtown Toronto and back to the National Trade Centre at the C.N.E. grounds. The slogan this year was "Together We're Stronger" and more than 20,000 people came out to show their support for Israel. Approximately $500,000 was raised. The Walk culminated in a Festival at the National Trade Centre that had a drumming workshop and a 7-foot Magen David made out of balloons.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a promotional video, two t-shirts, a windbreaker and a hat from the Israel Funwalk of 2001. One t-shirt has the sponsors listed on the back. There is also a royal blue child's hat.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 74 photographs (jpg), 1 videocassette, 2 t-shirts, 1 windbreaker jacket, 1 hat.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Physical Condition
The digital photographs in this sub-sub-series are currently housed on original CDs from 2003. They will need to be moved to another medium to extend their lifespan, i.e. server or archival quality disc.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2004 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2004 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-30
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2004
Physical Description
830 MB textual and other material
Admin History/Bio
The 2004 Walk with Israel took place on Sunday, May 30th. The co-chairs were Peter Eckstein and David Peltz, and the Walk was led by Police Chief Julian Fantino. The kick-off party at Coronation Park featured an attempt to create the world's largest hora. There was also a bone marrow donor registry and an opportunity for Jewish singles to be matched up through J-Date. The RioCan Festival at Ontario Place following the walk featured an Israel mini-mall. The event drew nearly 20,000 people.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a t-shirt, digital documents and digital graphic images relating to the 2004 Walk with Israel.
Notes
Physcial description note: Includes 344 photographs (electronic), 1 moving image (electronic) and 1 t-shirt.
Physical Condition
The digital records in this sub-sub-series are currently housed on original CDs from 2004. They will need to be moved to another medium to extend their lifespan, i.e. server or archival quality disc.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2005 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2005 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-31
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2005
Physical Description
1.17 MB textual records (electronic) and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 2005, the Walk with Israel introduced its first-ever mascot. A city-wide competition to name the lion brought in 250 suggestions from children; the winning name was Arr-yeah, a combination of a cheer and the Hebrew word for lion, "aryeh." Close to 15,000 people, including 800 volunteers, turned out for the event on Sunday, May 29th. There were four co-chairs this year: Beth Singer, Nelly Zagdanski, Sara Zagdanksi and Felicia Posluns. Mike "Pinball" Clemens of the Toronto Argonauts appeared at the kick-off party, and the crowd was led by Police Chief Bill Blair. The 6 kilometre downtown route began at Coronation Park near the gates to the C.N.E., and ended up at Ontario Place for the RioCan Festival.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs of Arr-yeah the lion mascot and electronic versions of the banners made for the event. It also includes a DVD and video version of the promotional video shown in schools.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 23 photographs (jpg), 1 videocassette and 1 optical disc (3 mins., 28 secs.).
Physical Condition
The digital records in this sub-sub-series are currently housed on original CDs from 2005. They will need to be moved to another medium to extend their lifespan, i.e. server or archival quality disc.
Accession Number
2009-9-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
11 records – page 1 of 1.

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