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Accession Number
2015-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-7-5
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
3 cm textual records
7 photographs
Date
1955-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes academic certificates and awards, plaques and certificates honouring his service to the community, a composite photograph of his graduating class at Osgoode Law School, and photographs of Morley Wolfe with notable people. Idenitifed in the photographs: Jean Chretien, Hilary Weston and Rosa Parks.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 26 cm and smaller
1 folder of textual records
1 poster ; 35 x 51 cm
Date
[194-]-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of Morley S. Wolfe. Photographs include a snapshot of Morely dressed in a Harbord Collegiate sweater; his first year law class at Osgoode Hall (1951); attendance at B'nai Brith Wilson Height Heights Lodge events and publicity stills from Branson Hospital. Textual records include a Branson Hospital promotional flyer; correspondence with Sir Martin Gilbert, the official biographer of Winston Churchill; email print outs of a series of letter to the editor correspondnece from Morely to the Toronto Star con cerning human rights,immigration and Israel's right to exist.
In addition, there is a photocopy of a Toronto Star photo of Mayor Art Eggleton, awarding Morley S. Wolfe with the William P. Hubbard race relations award; a print out from Harbordite (page 21) of Morely's entry into the Harbord club; a print out of his review of the book Walking with Giants by Saoul Feldberg; and a poster presented to Morely by the Children's Breakfast Club's presdient Rick Gosling, on the occasion of his 75th birthday (2003), in hounour of Morely's volunteer work with the club.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971, he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Human rights
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 90 cm of textual records
1 scrapbook
ca. 24 photographs : b&w and col. (17 jpg)
Date
[ca. 1907] - 2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual material that document Morley Wolfe’s community involvement and personal and professional life. Personal records include photographs of Morley and his family, correspondence with family and friends, his marriage certificate and school diplomas.
Professional records include his curriculum vitae, photographs, reports, correspondence, nomination letters for various awards, such as the Order of Canada, news clippings, certificates and awards, newsletters, event invitations and records documenting his involvement in a court case between the Ontario Deputy Judges Association and the Attorney General of Ontario. Also included are scanned photographs of Morley presenting an award to Rosa Parks (1999), receiving his Ontario Senior Achievement award (2000), and meeting with Jean Chrétien (2001).
Accession also includes one scrapbook documenting Morley's term as national president of BBC. Finally, accession contains records documenting the various appeals filed against BBC by Wolfe, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 and CMOBBC, such as, the appeal notices filed with BBI’s Court of Appeal, correspondence, various BBC constitutions and by-laws, Wilson Heights Lodge executive meeting minutes, CMOBBC newsletters, and news clippings.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court.
His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin.
Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006.
His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations.
Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award.
Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful.
Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization.
Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-4-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 photographs: col., ; 12 x 18 cm and smaller
Date
2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting several professional achievements of Morley S. Wolfe. It includes: one programme from the Morley S. Wolfe Youth Book Competition, one programme from the Law Society of Upper Canada Awards Ceremony (with Morley S. Wolfe as the Lincoln Alexander Award Recipient), a clipping about the Youth Book Competition, and three photographs. Identified in the photographs: Morley S. Wolfe and Gavin Mackenzie (treasurer of LSUC).
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
6 cm textual records
1 photograph
Date
1982-1983
Scope and Content
This accession consists of a scrapbook with materials documenting Morley Wolfe's presidency of B'Nai Brith Canada in 1982. Materials include congratulatory letters, tribute items, badges, pins, invitations, banquet programs, annual convention programs, speeches, awards, and certificates. There is also a photograph from a Harbord Collegiate reunion from the early 1990s. People identified in the photo: A. Kashen, I Cass, M. Barrett, G. Rumak, M. Silverberg, S. Rabinowitz, B. Federman, L. Novitsky, S. Friedberg, F. Gross, E. Robbins, B. Kleiman, B. Nightingale, S. Siegelman, G. Saunders, H. Freeman, M. Yasny, E. Fisher, L. Rosen, E. Smith, S. Landsberg, and M. Wolfe.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Law
Women
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley, 1928-
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-6-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 scrapbook : 28 x 41 cm
Date
1949-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scrapbook documenting the Supreme Court of Canada case between Bernard Wolf, Annie Noble and property owners at the Beach O' Pines resort regarding antisemitic restrictive property covenants. The scrapbook includes news clippings, correspondence, CJC Public Relations Information bulletins, one photograph of Wolf, factums of court proceedings and a resolution of London's B'nai Brith Lodge #1012. Also included are event programmes and invitations that do not appear related to the court case.
Use Conditions
None
Subjects
Antisemitism
Human rights
Name Access
Wolf, Bernard
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1950-2002
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two issues of the University of Toronto's "Undergrad" publication (1950 and 1951), which contain articles written by Morley Wolfe. Also included is a copy of the completed nomination form which was successfully submitted to nominate Morley for the City of Toronto's William P. Hubbard Award (1990) as well as a copy of B'nai Brith Canada's book outlining the League of Human Rights Black/Jewish Dialogue project (2002).
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court.
His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin.
Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006.
His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations.
Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award.
Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful.
Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization.
Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
20 photographs : col. ; 10 x 15 cm
1 plaque
Date
1978, 2016-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two thank-you notes addressed to Morley Wolfe from Supreme Court Justice Rosalie Abella, as well as a plaque in appreciation presented to Wolfe for inspiring the genesis of CASTS (Canadians Against Slavery and Torture in Sudan), which led to a larger coalition in Canada against the genocide in Darfur. There is also an accompanying photo on printer paper of Wolfe receiving the plaque from Dr. Norman Epstein alongside C. Arthur Dowes. Finally, there is photo scrapbook compiled by Arnold Lipshitz documenting the Advocates Society's trip to Israel. The Advocates Society was made up of judges and lawyers in Ontario. Identified in the photographs are Franz Bowman; Barbara Bowman; Kathy Parkinson; Sandra Newman; Douglas Caruthers; Cecile Goldenberg and Morley Wolfe.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Descriptive Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: See accession record for page numbers of identified individuals.
Subjects
Lawyers
Name Access
Wolfe, Morley S., 1928-
Places
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-2-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 letter
Date
[2018?]
Scope and Content
Item is a handwritten note written by Rosalie "Rosie" Abella and addressed to the donor.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil Wolfe (b. 1895) and Betty Wolfe (née Davidow). He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding justice of the peace for Ontario and deputy judge in small claims court. His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin. Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006. His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as national president of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also president of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations. Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including: City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award. Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful. Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization. Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Subjects
Jewish judges
Name Access
Abella, Irving, 1940-
Wolfe, Morley S., 1928-
Places
Ottawa (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
April 1977-March 1978
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one Information Bulletin on Soviet Jewry (vol. 3, issue 4) and two Communique (No. 10, No. 21), both produced by the Canadian Committee for Soviet Jewry.
Subjects
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Committee for Soviet Jewry
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Civil and Human Rights Legislation sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-1
File
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1950
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence, newspaper clippings and a statement by Rabbi A.L. Feinberg regarding the Forest Hill Village Board of Education's experimental project to segregate Jewish and non-Jewish students.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Human rights
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
ID
Fonds 38; Series 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
International Council of Jewish Women series
Level
Series
Fonds
38
Series
6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1940-1996
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
11 photographs
Admin History/Bio
The International Council of Jewish Women is made up of Jewish women's organizations from across the world. Founded in 1912 and revived in 1949, the ICJW's goals were to promote equal rights, women's rights, understanding, and peace throughout the world. It sought to spread knowledge about and strengthen Jewish cultural traditions, to help build Israel, and to encourage women to participate in community services. It cooperated actively as a non-governmental organization with UNESCO, and was an accredited observer at the United Nations. The National Council of Jewish Women has been a vital member of the ICJW, with a number of its members having served on the executive and as vice-presidents and presidents of the ICJW.
In a first attempt to form an international council of Jewish women, representatives from the National Council of Jewish Women in the United States, along with similar organizations in Great Britain and Germany, met in Rome in 1912. Their efforts were aborted with the onset of World War I, but in the 1920s, Jewish women's groups reconvened and ended up holding three meetings. After a long hiatus due to the devastation of World War II and the Holocaust, the International Council of Jewish Women was officially re-born in 1949 in Paris. The ICJW has held conventions every three years since 1954, and in countries around the world, including in Toronto in 1972, and in Vancouver in 1987.
The ICJW was organized in a committee system which communicated through a network of newsletters, mailings, and triennial meetings. Committees have included By-Laws, Community Services, Herczeg Israel Seminar, Newsletter, North American Committee, Public Relations, Resolutions, Soviet Jewry, Status of Women, and United Nations. The ICJW also held regional meetings, seminars such as the Rosa and Esteban Herczeg seminars in Jerusalem, and field trips.
Canadian presidents of the ICJW have included Antonia S. Robinson (1957-1960), and Helen Marr (1990-1993). While serving as president, Tony Robinson represented Jewish women of Canada at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.
Helen Marr served as president of National Council of Jewish Women of Canada, Toronto Section from 1973 to 1976, and as president of the NCJWC from 1981 to 1985. She married Gerald Marr, and has three children. Helen served as Canada's Vice-President to the ICJW from 1986-1989, and chaired the ICJW's triennial convention in Vancouver in 1987. She also held leadership positions with the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Ben Gurion University, Canadian Jewish Congress, and the Skylight Theatre.
Scope and Content
Series contains records documenting the National Council of Jewish Women of Canada's involvement in the International Council of Jewish Women. It includes pamphlets and publicity material, newsletters, the 75th anniversary tribute book, by-laws and resolutions, material from conventions and other activities, correspondence, and photographs.
A portion of the records were generated during Helen Marr's presidency of the ICJW. These records include by-laws and guidelines, committee files, and mailings.
Notes
The International Council of Jewish Women was variously called the World Congress of Jewish Women, the World Conference of Jewish Women, and the World Organization of Jewish Women between 1912 and 1929.
Name Access
Helen Marr
World Congress of Jewish Women
World Conference of Jewish Women
World Organization of Jewish Women
Subjects
Human rights
Women
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2009-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-4
Material Format
object
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
M6 artifacts
1 postcard
1 textual record
Date
[193-?]-[195-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a Tip Top Tailors wall clock and five tzedakah boxes from Israel. Also included is a postcard of the Mossington Park resort on Lake Simcoe featuring a Gentiles Only sign, several copies from the mid-1940s of the CJC Committee on Social and Economic Studies Information and Comment bulletins, as well as a programme for the twenty-seventh anniversary celebrations for the Soviet Union, held at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1944. The program included a message from the prime minister, W. L. MacKenzie King, and a broadcast from Paul Robeson. The master of ceremonies was Lorne Greene. The content of the CJC studies include: research projects of the CJC (1946), racial discrimination and public policy (1946), the use of the terms "racial origin" and "religion" in the Canadian census (1946), opinion polls and social control (1946), intermarriage and children of intermarriages (1946), prejudice and Canadian unity (1946), comparative occupational distribution (1947), community action versus racial prejudice (1947), audience reaction analysis to the film "Don't Be a Sucker" (1947), Fair Employment Practices Laws for Canada (1947), age distribution of Jewish population in Ontario (1949), Immigration of Jews to Canada (1948), Saskatchewan Bill of Rights Act (1949), Jews in the professions in Canada (1949), answering the bigot: a summary of the Incident control project (1949), Canadian public opinion on racial restrictive covenants (1949), anti-minority discrimination and the law: a Canadian progress report (1950), immigration to Canada 1945 to 1949: official figures, refugee industries in Canada: latest available statistics (1947), and from juvenile immigrant to Canadian citizen (1950). Authors of CJC reports include Dr. A. F. Citron, Dr. J. Harding, Dr. Louis Rosenberg, Dr. Manfred Saalheimer, Professor F. R. Scott and Dr. Morris C. Shumiatcher.
Custodial History
The items were bought by Morris Norman, a collector of Judaica, and donated to the archives on 3 June 2009.
Subjects
Human rights
Discrimination in employment
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Tip Top Tailors
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Genya Intrator
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
26 Nov. 1990
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Genya Intrator
Number
OH 223
OH 224
Subject
Antisemitism
Women
Human rights
Interview Date
26 Nov. 1990
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Mindy A. Skapinker
AccessionNumber
1993-9-1
Total Running Time
OH 223A: 46 minutes OH 223B: 46 minutes OH 224A: 16 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Genya Intrator was born in Moscow and moved as a child to Palestine in the 1930s. She was a member of the Israeli underground and served in the Israeli army during the War of Independence. She played a central leadership role in the Soviet Jewry movement in Canada. She founded Women for Soviet Jewry and served as chair of the National Soviet Jewry Committee. She helped with the creation of the Group of 35, a Soviet Jewry activist group in Toronto. Genya had regular contact by phone with Soviet activists and relayed their information back to Israeli consuls. She was an advisor to B'nai Brith on Soviet Jewry. She started an inter-religious Task Force for Soviet Jewry in Canada.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Intrator, Genya
Skapinker, Mindy A.
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Genya Intrator discusses the formation of the "Group of 35", a Soviet Jewry OHtivist group.

In this clip, Genya Intrator describes how information about Soviet Jews was passed on to the Israeli consulate in New York who trOHked all the data. She explains how she was appointed as a "secret agent" who would report information from her many phone calls to the Soviet Union.

Accession Number
2015-9-30
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-30
Material Format
sound recording
Physical Description
2 audiotapes
Date
1968
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two reel-to-reel audiotapes recording John Beattie at Allan Gardens on June 30, 1968.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material
Subjects
Antisemitism
Demonstrations
Human rights
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Beattie, John
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
John J. Glass fonds
Documents series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 109; Series 2; File 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
John J. Glass fonds
Documents series
Level
File
Fonds
109
Series
2
File
27
Material Format
textual record
Date
1937-1972
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence relating to John Glass' battle against discrimination based on race and religion in Ontario and society in general. Included are commentaries on his newspaper article proposing amendments to the Ontario Libel and Slander Act, his correspondence with the Canadian Jewish Congress, and the prime minister (premier) of Ontario regarding offensive "Gentiles Only" signs on highways, at country resorts, and in parks. In addition there is a report on the operation of Nazi-affiliated groups in the province and a telegram expressing support from a "Negro Youth Group," as well as an impassioned speech delivered by Glass in the Ontario legislature, in which he pleads for human rights and the end of intlolerance and bigotry.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress
Ontario Libel and Slander Act
Ontario. Premier
Subjects
Antisemitism
Discrimination
Human rights
Physical Condition
Several of the letters are in fagile condition and are enclosed in plastic.
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1979-9-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one invitation to a Y.M.H.A. youth Chanukah candle lighting ceremony, one Lubavitch Youth Organization flyer, and one Toronto Committee for Soviet Jewry worldwide solidarity flyer.
Subjects
Habad
Hanukkah
Human rights
Youth
Name Access
Dorenman, Alexander
Young Men's Hebrew Association (Toronto, Ont.)
Toronto Committee for Soviet Jewry
Lubavitch Youth Organization
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2003-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records and graphic materials
Date
[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records relating to Markson's design work for the Holocaust Centre, for Jewish Family & Child Services, and for the film, Growing up in America. These records include textual records, slides, negatives, photographs, films, and sound recordings in various formats.
Use Conditions
Donor retains copyright. Material can be made available for viewing and reference at the OJA. Researchers who require copies for personal use or publication must obtain permission from donor first.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Name Access
Markson, Morley
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 Mar. 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Number
OH 210
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Law
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
4 Mar. 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Christie Pits riot at approximately minute 16:00
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Benjamin "Ben" Gershon Kayfetz was born on 24 December 1916 in Toronto. He married Eva Silver and had two children. Ben graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a bachelor of arts in modern languages. He worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville, Ontario and Niagara Falls, Ontario between 1941 and 1943. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in postal censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British-occupied Germany, where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947. Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the national director of community relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) and as the executive (national) director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC-B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the central region executive director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. He worked to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish communities worldwide. He was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress in 1985 and the Order of Canada in 1986. In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym Gershon B. Newman. He also gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues and was actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), the Canadian Jewish Historical Society, and the Yiddish Luncheon Circle. He died in 2002.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Balmy Beach Swastika Club
Canadian Jewish Congress
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Geographic Access
Toronto
Kew Beach
Christie Pits
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 210, Ben Kayfetz\AC 210 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz describes the skirmish between antisemitic and Jewish youths at Kew Beach in July 1933.

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz discusses the laws that restricted “Jews or other objectionable races” from purchasing, owning or renting properties in Toronto and summer resort areas. He describes the steps taken to change the law.

Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Civil and Human Rights Legislation sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-1
File
152
Material Format
textual record
Date
1972
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence related to the Ontario Human Rights Commission, including documentation of complaints of racial discrimination. There are also documents regarding the situation of Jews in Syria, including a "rebuttal" from the Federation of Arab Canadian Societies.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Name Access
Federation of Canadian Arab Societies
Ontario Human Rights Commission
Subjects
Human rights
Jews--Syria
Race discrimination
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morley Torgov fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 108
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morley Torgov fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
108
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1938-2011
Physical Description
5.2 m of textual records and graphic material
Admin History/Bio
Morley Torgov (b. 1927) is a Canadian novelist and short story writer and former commercial lawyer.
Torgov was born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario to Allan (b. Russia, 8 July 1895-1964?) and Janey (née Colish) Torgov (b. England, 1901-d. Sault Ste. Marie, July 1926). Allan Torgov owned and operated a clothing store in Sault Ste. Marie named Allan's. Morley married Anna Pearl (née Cohen) in 1948 and had two children, Sarah Jane Steinberg and Alexander Torgov (b. 1959-d. 2009), and four grandchildren.
Torgov was educated at the University of Toronto, receiving his bachelor of laws degree from Osgoode Hall and was called to the bar in 1954. He became a partner in the law firm Olsch, Torgov, Cohen and specialized in commercial law. While practicing law in Toronto during the 1960s, he turned to writing. Torgov's first book, A Good Place to Come From (1974), a comic memoir of growing up Jewish in Sault Ste. Marie, was made into a CBC miniseries and won the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour. Torgov continued to write other books including the Outside Chance of Maximillian Glick (1982), which won him his second Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour. The CBC produced a television series based on this work and the book was published in several languages. This success was followed by St. Farb's Day (1990), which won the Toronto Book Award and the National Jewish Book Award for fiction. Other published works include the Abramsky Variations (1977), the War to End All Wars (1998), Stickler and Me (2002), Murder in A-major (2008), and the Mastersinger from Minsk (2012).
Torgov's writings also include several screenplays for television and film and numerous essays and articles for the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, the Montreal Gazette, the Canadian Lawyer and the New York Times Sunday Magazine. Torgov has been honored by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, naming their annual award the TORGI after Torgov, the first recipient of that award in 1984. In 2005, he received the Order of Mariposa, a lifetime recognition award from the Leacock Society. In 2010, he received the Order of Canada as an acknowledgement of his contributions to Canadian society.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material related to the life and work of Morley Torgov. Included are literary drafts and working papers, reviews, speeches, presentations, public addresses, memorabilia, sketches and drawings, photographs, correspondence, newspaper and magazine articles, and Torgov's original file folders with jottings of ideas and references for future use.
Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: The scope and content for most of the file level descriptions are taken verbatim from the original description provided by Mr. Torgov at the time of donation and therefore is written in the first person.
Name Access
Torgov, Morley, 1927-
Subjects
Authors
Related Material
Researchers should consult the Morley Torgov fonds at the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library for other records.
Arrangement
Records were arranged at the file level by the creator. This original arrangement has been maintained by the archivist.
Places
Sault Ste. Marie (Ont.)
Accession Number
1984-12-8
1986-12-6
1989-12-7
1990-12-10
1992-12-4
1995-12-4
1998-12-2
1999-12-3
2000-12-2
2002-12-6
2003-12-4
2004-12-1
2005-3-2
2005-12-3
2006-12-6
2007-12-16
2008-12-7
2011-12-3
2018-8-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1979-11-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-11-20
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1927-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two installation banquet programmes for the Rho Pi Phi Fraternity, Nu Chapter in Toronto and a Masons certificate granted to Mooney S. Mirochnick of the Mount Sinai Lodge.
Subjects
Freemasonry--Lodges
Greek letter societies
Name Access
Mirochnick, Mooney S.
Rho Pi Phi Fraternity
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2002-10-41
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2002-10-41
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records
Date
1945, [198-?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a financial ledger book for an unidentified organization and meeting minutes and other material for the Canadian Jewish Congress.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Child Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 3; Item 39
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Child Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
3
Item
39
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Sept. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 9 cm and 11 x 8cm
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of a 1 year old baby seated on a fur rug with a set of play keys in its hands, while looking away from the camera.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Committee for Soviet Jewry series
Refusnik cases sub-series
Individual Refusnik cases sub-sub series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
3-6-1
File
272
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[197-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12 x 10 cm
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Hirshhorn, Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Hirshhorn, Wolfe
Page Number
686
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Leibel, Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Leibel, Wolfe
Page Number
291
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Weinstock, Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Weinstock, Wolfe
Page Number
360
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-6-12
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 60 cm of textual records
11 photographs (3 negatives) : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
1976-[ca. 1990]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records that trace Natan Sharansky's history as a prisoner of political conscience; the broader Refusenik issue; and the community advocacy efforts of Debby and Stan Solomon from 1976 and into the late 1980s at the local, national and international scales. Included are memos and newsletters from the Committee for Soviet Jewry (Ontario Region and national-level); background information as well as petition templates, speeches and planning documentation produced by the Committee to Release Anatoly Sharansky and the Beth Tikvah Synagogue in conjunction with community organizations, including the CJC and its Soviet Jewry social action committees, to support on-going advocacy efforts; correspondence with Canadian and American political representatives at the provincial/state and national levels; white papers/grey literature from non-governmental organizations about the persecution of the Soviet Jewry; planning documentation from the First Annual Sharansky Lectureship on Human Rights in 1980; correspondence, articles and ephemera associated with the granting of Sharansky's honourary law doctorate from York University in 1982; 1985 Freedom Rally/Weekend in Ottawa planning documentation and correspondence; 1987 National Conference on the Soviet Jewry and Mobilization for Freedom planning documentation; 1987 Community Rally at Massey Hall promotional materials; and promotional materials from Sharansky's autobiographical "Fear No Evil" 1988 book launch. Graphic material includes photographs of Sharansky's release during the February 11, 1986 American-Soviet prisoner exchange on the Glienicke Bridge in Berlin.
Identified in the photographs are: Debby Solomon; Alan Solomon; Natan Sharansky; Avital Sharansky; U.S. Ambassador Richard Burt;
Custodial History
Material was collected and/or created by Debby Solomon, Natan Sharansky's cousin. Debby donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Debby Solomon is the cousin of Anatoly (Natan) Sharansky, the Soviet born Israeli politician, human activist and author who spent nine years in Soviet prisons. Debby's father Boris Landis (born 1900) and Sharansky's father were first cousins.Their grandfathers were brothers. Debby's father immigrated 1929 to Toronto from Russia as his older brothers were already in Toronto. Debby and her husband Stan Solomon got involved in the community's activism efforts to free Sharansky and other Refuseniks.They were worked for many years on these efforts by planning programs through their synagogue Beth Tikvah and with Sam Filer, a lawyer and volunteer at the CJC who was also a member of Beth Tikvah.
Subjects
Antisemitism
Politics and government
Human rights
Demonstrations
Synagogues
Committees
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 30 cm of graphic materials and textual records
Date
1936-[2004]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Ray and Rose Wolfe. Included are numerous photographs of Ray and Rose Wolfe with different individuals and at different events as well as a small number of textual records. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Bluma Appel, David Ben-Gurion, George H. W. Bush, Elizabeth Comper, Tony Comper, Mikhail Gorbachev, Golda Meier, Brian Mulroney, Gunthar Plaut, Yitzhak Rabin, Bob Rae, Shimon Peres, Justin Trudeau, Pierre Elliott Trudeau, John Turner, Desmond Tutu, Elizabeth Wolfe, and Morris Wolfe.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Elizabeth Wolfe, daughter of Ray and Rose Wolfe, prior to donation.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Selected images also available as JPEG and TIFF files.
Subjects
Jewish philanthropists
Married people
Name Access
Wolfe, Ray, 1917-1990
Wolfe, Rose, 1916-2016
Places
Canada
Israel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-12-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
moving images
Physical Description
43 cm of graphic material and textual records
1 film reel
1 photograph : b&w ; 24 x 19 cm (sight) in frame 33 x 27 cm
Date
1962-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting events associasted with Ray and Rose Wolfe. Included are photo albums and scrapbooks, four photographs, one folder of certificates, one folder of correspondence, and a recording of a speech Abba Eban gave in 1975 to the Canadian Friends of Haifa University. The albums and scrapbooks document the following: the 1963 UJA campaign; a 1978 event held by the University of Haifa in appreciation of Ray Wolfe; a 1980 Negev Dinner tribute held in honour of Rose Wolfe; a 1981 Hineni conference in Montreal; and a 1982 Europe/Israel tour by a UJA delegation that includes the Belzbergs, the Fienbergs, the Hermans, and the Wolfes. There is also a 1970 memorial book of the official opening of the Samuel Bronfman House commemorating fifty years of service to the Canadian Jewish Congress. The book contains a personal note from Mr. Bronfman to Ray Wolfe.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Elizabeth Wolfe, daughter of Ray and Rose Wolfe, prior to donation.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Jewish philanthropists
Name Access
Wolfe, Ray, 1917-1990
Wolfe, Rose, 1916-2016
Places
Europe
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28; Series 5; File 162
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
28
Series
5
File
162
Material Format
textual record
Date
1972-1976
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file consists of correspondence concerning Camp Hagshama and the activities of the Zionist Organization of Canada - Eastern Region.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Executive Committee series
Executive Director sub-series
Executive Director's Correspondence sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
67
Series
5-5-1
File
190
Material Format
textual record
Date
3 Mar. 1970-19 Oct. 1970
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 45; Item 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
45
Item
25
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1910
Physical Description
1 photograph: b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
The image is a copy photograph of Wolf and Sarah Goldstick, taken on Toronto Centre Island around 1910.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto Islands (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Rosenberg, Wolfe & Abraham
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Rosenberg, Wolfe & Abraham
Page Number
215
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Schiff, H. & Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Schiff, H. & Wolfe
Page Number
299
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wolfe, Harris & Fela
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wolfe, Harris & Fela
Page Number
225
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zalken, Zalman, Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Zalken, Zalman, Wolfe
Page Number
403
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Name
Montague Raisman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Montague Raisman
Number
OH 64
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Human rights
Antisemitism
World War, 1939-1945
Zionism
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
39:42 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Low sound volume
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Montague Raisman came to Canada from England in 1926. He was actively involved in B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge and held positions of office. He served as the commanding officer for the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto during the Second World War. He was instrumental in the formation of the Joint Public Relations Committee, a united Jewish voice in response to pro-Nazi activity.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Raisman, Montague
B'nai Brith
Lipinsky, Jack
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Calgary (Alta.)
Montréal (Québec)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 64 - Raisman\OH64_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Montague describes the formation of the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron during the Second World War. He discusses the recruitment and training of the officers and cadets. He explains how this squadron was instrumental in changing recruitment qualifications to allow entry of new immigrants and black cadets.

In this clip, Montague Raisman discusses the events leading up to an association between B

Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
20 Sep. 1985
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Number
OH 109
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Immigrants--Canada
Labor
Labor unions
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
20 Sep. 1985
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
109A: 60 minutes 109B: 6 minutes
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Kalmen was born on 5 January 1912 in Poland. He worked in Montreal as a typesetter and linotype operator. He was active in the labour and human rights movements in Canada. Kalmen served as the director of the Jewish Labour Committee in 1945. In collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Canadian government, and trade unions, the Jewish Labour Committee helped Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment. Kalman sat on the Refugee Status Advisory Committee for the federal government.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Kaplansky, Kalmen
Platnick, Phyllis
Jewish Labour Committee
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 109 - Kaplansky\OH109_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 109 - Kaplansky\OH109_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky discusses some of the obstacles to the relocation of displaced Jews to Canada after the Second World War. He describes a tripartite proposal involving consultation and cooperation among trade unions, management, and government, which enabled the immigration project.

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky explains that bribery, corruption, and perjury were a way of life after the Second World War. He relates anecdotes as an example.

Level
Item
ID
Item 1310
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1310
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1909
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Scope and Content
Left to right: Israel Sydney Wolfe; Mrs. Ansna Albert; Min Wolfe (m. Marcus).
Name Access
Wolfe, Israel Sydney
Albert, Mrs. Ansna
Wolfe, Min
Marcus, Min
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-6-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 9; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Miscellaneous collection series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
9
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[between 1890 and 1910]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jake Wolfe was related to Max and Maurice Wolfe who started the Ontario Produce Company, which was the forerunner of the IGA grocery franchise.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Jake (Yael) Wolfe and Sarah Frieidel.
Name Access
Frieidel, Sarah
Wolfe, Jake
Subjects
Portraits
Weddings
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Belzatsky, Wolf, Bute, David
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Belzatsky, Wolf, Bute, David
Page Number
576
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levy, Wolf, Minnie, Annie
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Levy, Wolf, Minnie, Annie
Page Number
258
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Warshafsky, Yosel & Chaim Wolfe
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Warshafsky, Yosel & Chaim Wolfe
Page Number
216
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 9; File 141
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
9
File
141
Material Format
textual record
Date
Nov. 1951
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains record of the sailing of the S. S. HOMELAND, due Halifax 13 November 1951.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 9; File 146
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
9
File
146
Material Format
textual record
Date
Dec. 1951
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains record of the sailing of the S. S. ASCANIA, due Halifax 4 December 1951.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 9; File 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
9
File
7
Material Format
textual record
Date
Aug. 1949
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains record of the sailing of the S. S. SCYTHIA, from Le Havre, 20 August 1949, to Quebec, 28 August 1949.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 9; File 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
9
File
9
Material Format
textual record
Date
Sept. 1949
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains record of the sailing of the S. S. SAMARIA, from Cuxhaven (Le Havre), 10 September, 1949 (originally 8 September) due Quebec, 18 September 1949.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 9; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Arrivals series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
9
File
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
Oct. 1949
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File contains record of sailing of S. S. SAMARIA, from Cuxhaven, 13 October 1949, to Quebec, 23 October 1949.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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