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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Henry Rosenbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 121
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Rosenbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
121
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Date
1928-2015
Physical Description
247 photographs : b&w and col. (1 negative); 20 x 25 or smaller
13 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Henry "Hanoch" Rosenbaum (1925-2015) was born in Radom, Poland. He was the second youngest of eight children born to Rachel Rosenbaum (née Katz) and Moshe Rosenbaum.
In the aftermath of the Second World War, Herny learned the fate of Radom's Jewish civilian population. Two thirds of Radom's Jewish population were victims of mass murder and perished in the extermination camp Treblinka, immediately following the first liquidation of Radom's large ghetto in August 1942. Henry's parents, two siblings, and their families were among the innocent victims murdered during the Holocaust.
Henry Rosenbaum met his wife Bella Rotbard (1925–2012) while living in an Italian DP camp after the war. Although Bella was also from Radom, she did not know the Rosenbaum family. Bella's parents, her sixteen-year-old sister, and four-year-old brother, as well as most of her parents' extended families, were also victims of the Holocaust.
While in Italy, the Joint Distribution Committee funded "mock kibbutzim," preparing Holocaust survivors for immigration to Palestine and kibbutz life. Bella, a one-time member of the secular Jewish youth movement Hashomer Hatzair, believed that she was destined to be a "kibbutznik," a member of a kibbutz.
In 1946, Bella and Henry immigrated to Palestine as part of the Bricha. The Bricha supported the illegal immigration of Holocaust survivor refugees to Palestine. They spent their first few days in Atlit, a British Mandate detainee camp and soon settled on kibbutz. Bella married Henry in 1946 and moved to an apartment in Ramat Gan. During this time Henry served in the IDF’s motor pool.
Henry, Bella, and their young daughter Brenda (b. 1949) immigrated to Toronto in 1952. With the assistance of a relative, Henry gained employment in a print shop sweeping floors. Henry soon advanced to machine operator and in 1961 opened his own print shop, Trio Press Limited.
Bella worked in the garment industry, sewing collars onto shirts and earned her wages through piece work. She continued working in manufacturing up until the birth of her second child Murray (b. 1961).
Henry Rosenbaum was an active life-long member of the Radom Society and served as editor for their quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Henry Rosenbaum's daughter Brenda Bornstein.
Scope and Content
Fonds illustrates the family history of Henry Rosenbaum and the life he and his wife Bella Rosenbaum rebuilt in Canada. Photographs document: early life in Poland, displaced persons camp in Italy, immigration to Palestine, military service in the Israel Defense Forces, family life in Israel, immigration and settlement in Canada and many milestone events and celebrations in Toronto, Ontario. Additional photographs of the Radom Society in Toronto. The majority of the photographs were assembled in a scrapbook created by their daughter Brenda Bornstein in celebration of her parents' thirtieth wedding anniversary (1976). In addition, there is a more comprehensive biography written by Henry and Bella's son-in-law Eric Bornstein.
Fonds consists of records relating to Henry Rosenbaum and his affiliation with B’nai Radom. Included are programs and souvenir booklets from the 1962 unveiling of a monument in memory of the Jewish Martyrs and Heroes of Radom and Vicinity (Poland), annual Holocaust remembrance (Yizkor) events published in 1987 and 2010; and a 50th Anniversary of Liberation publication. Books include a Yiddish language bound copy of the Voice of Radom from 1963-1965, an English language bound copy of the Voice of Radom 1983–1989 and Henry Rosenbaum’s personal memoir published in 1995. In addition, there are eight photographs of Henry's great-grandchildren, and a photo of Henry with his daughter Brenda.In addition there is a collection of speeches written by Henry Rosenbaum primarily for family milestone events such as weddings, birthdays, bar mtizvahs, and bat mitzvahs. In addition there is a copy of a presentation made to the Radom Congregation on the occasion of Israel's twenty-fifth year of independence, a Hebrew-language letter of congratulations, and several personal letters written by Murray Rosenbaum (the latter are addressed to his parents while travelling to Israel and Europe). The personal speeches written and delivered by Henry were in honour of the following relatives: Rivi Anklewicz, Marshall Lofchick, Murray Rosenbaum, Elana Aizic, Regina Goldstein, Brenda Rosenbaum, Eric "Ricky" Bornstein, Murray Severin, Robin Severin-Weingort, Rachel Bornstein, Susan Szainwald, Daniel Bornstein, Sholom Rosenbaum, Bella Rosenbaum, Linda Goldstein, and Leon Aizic.
Subjects
Holocaust survivors
Creator
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Poland
Italy
Palestine
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2015-10-5
2017-2-13
2019-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2019-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-6-2
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 24 cm on mat 29 x 35 cm
Date
1952
Scope and Content
Item consists of one photograph of a Passover seder held at the Hamilton Mountain Sanatorium, hosted by for Jewish inmates by members of the Hamilton Jewish community. Seated beginning fifth from left are: Ralph Milrod, Sylvia Milrod, Howard Chandler, and Elsa Chandler.
Administrative History
Howard and Elsa Chandler, both Holocaust survivors, immigrated to Toronto through England and Sweden in 1947 and 1948 respectively. They met and married in Toronto. Elsa was recuperating from tuberculosis in Hamilton Mountain Sanatorium when this photograph was taken, shortly after the couple were married.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Holocaust survivors
Name Access
Chandler, Howard, 1928-
Chandler, Elsa, 1932-
Places
Hamilton (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-11-7
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
73 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1963–2018
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Nate Leipciger. Included are records documenting Nate's involvement with the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Holoaust Remembrance Committee, and the March of the Living, as well as thank you letters from students whom Nate addressed.
Administrative History
Nate Leipciger was born in Chorzów, Poland, in 1928. He survived the Sosnowiec Ghetto and the camps of Auschwitz-Birkenau, Funfteichen, GrossRosen, Flossenberg, Leonberg, and Dachau. Nate and his father were liberated in May 1945, and immigrated to Canada in 1948. In Toronto Nate attended high school and eventually obtained a university degree in engineering. He later established an engineering firm with several partners. In 1982, Nate chaired the Toronto Holocaust Remembrance Committee, later becoming an executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress National Holocaust Remembrance Committee. Nate was a member of the International Council to the Museum of Auschwitz-Birkenau for fifteen years and has been an educator on March of the Living trips to Poland and Israel for fifteen years. In 2015, The Azrieli Foundation published Nate's 280-page memoir "The Weight of Freedom" as part of their series of Holocaust memoirs by survivors in Canada. In 2016, Mr. Leipciger guided Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on a tour of Auschwitz-Birkenau.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Holocaust survivors
Name Access
Leipciger, Nate, 1928-
Places
Canada
Israel
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Irving Milchberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
26 Jul. 2007
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Irving Milchberg
Number
OH 333
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Holocaust survivors
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
26 Jul. 2007
Quantity
1 mini DV ; 1 archival DVD ; 1 reference DVD
Interviewer
Sharon Gubbay Helfer
Total Running Time
1 hr
Notes
Part of Ontario Small Jewish Communities Project.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Irving Milchberg, the Holocaust survivor known from Joseph Ziemian's book The Cigarette Sellers of Three Crosses Square, used to sell cigarettes to Nazis in Warsaw as an oprhan during the Second World War.
Milchberg, leader of a group of orphaned Jewish children hiding their identities, used to gather at Three Crosses Square, the centre of the German occupation of Warsaw, to sell cigarettes. They went wandering around under the very noses of policemen, gendarmes, Gestapo men, and ordinary spies.
Before joining the cigarette sellers, Milchberg twice escaped from the Nazis. The first time he scaled a fence and fled the Umschlagplatz, where Jews were put aboard trains to the Treblinka death camp. The second time, he managed to break the bars of the train taking him to Treblinka and scramble out. His father, mother, and three sisters were all murdered by the Nazis.
In 1945, Milchberg made his way to Czechoslovakia, then Austria, then to a camp for displaced people in occupied Germany, where he learned watchmaking, his lifelong occupation. In 1947 he moved to Canada, ending up in Niagara Falls, where he opened his own jewellery and watch business. In 1953 he met his wife, Renee, who had survived the war. They had two children and three grandchildren. Milchberg died in January 2014 at the age of eighty-six.
Material Format
moving images
Geographic Access
Niagara Falls, Ont.
Original Format
Mini DV
Copy Format
DVD
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2018-7-22
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-7-22
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
47 photographs : b&w and col. ; 19 x 14 cm or smaller
Date
1949-2007
Scope and Content
Accession consists of forty-seven photographs documenting Lilian Rosenthal's family.
Identified in the photographs are: Emy Berman (née Rosenthal), Ella Fleischmann (née Schwarcz), Esther Fleischmann, Jack Fleischmann, Ivan Fleischmann, Joanne Howe (née Fleischmann), Livia Bitton Jackson, Leah Kedar, Allan Leibler, Mary Leibler (née Schwarcz) Bram Morrison, Ruth Raphael, Amir Rosenthal, Annette Rosenthal, Arthur Rosenthal, Eddie Rosenthal, Herschel Rosenthal, Jack Rosenthal, Keren Rosenthal, Leslie Rosenthal, Lilian Rosenthal, Miriam Rosenthal (née Schwarcz), Murray Rosenthal, Nili Rosenthal, Ron Rosenthal, Shira Rosenthal, Valerie Rosenthal, William Rosenthal, Carmelle Rutman, Serena Rutman, Tami Rutman (née Rosenthal), Yasmin Rutman, Alexander Schwarcz, Manci Schwarcz, Susan Schwarcz, Miriam Sharon (née Stern), Mr. Shoychet, Mrs. Shoychet, Rochelle Treister (née Fleischmann), and Ugo Vero.
Administrative History
Lilian Rosenthal is the daughter of Holocaust survivors Miriam Rosenthal (née Schwarcz) and Rabbi William Rosenthal. She grew up in Sudbury, Ontario with her siblings, Leslie and Murray.
Lilian's parents were born in eastern Europe and came to Canada in 1947. They lived in Timmins for a year before moving to Sudbury, where William ("Bela") served as a rabbi, cantor, and teacher for sixteen years.
In 1965, the family moved to Toronto and Miriam and William opened a Judaica store at the corner Bathurst Street and Caribou Road. Together, Lilian's parents ran the store for more than forty years until retiring in 2007. William died on 11 April 2008; Miriam died on 10 February 2018.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availabilityusc of other formats: Digital access copies (jpg) have been created.
Finding aids: A short description including dates and identification is available for each photograph.
Associated material: The USC Shoah Foundation produced an oral history with Miriam Rosenthal, which has been digitized.
Subjects
Families
Family-owned business enterprises
Holocaust survivors
Name Access
Rosenthal (family)
Rosenthal, Lilian
Rosenthal, Miriam, 1922-2018
Rosenthal, William, 1911-2008
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Caribou Road (Toronto, Ont.)
Sudbury (Ont.)
Timmins (Ont.)
Toronto Islands (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-6-9
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg)
Date
1926
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one scanned family photograph of Eve's family shortly before their emigration from Russia to Canada.
Back row, left to right: Raizel Rosen, Yisroel Rosen. Front, left to right: Pesa Rosen holding Edith Rosen, Eve Rosen and Avraham Rosen.
Administrative History
Eve Rosen Gordon was born in Russia in 1923. When she was three years old, her parents and paternal grandparents came to Canada with Eve's sister and brother. Her uncle Aaron Rosen had been in Kitchener, Ontario since 1903. His business was scrap metal, and Eve's father joined him in the work to pay off their tickets from Russia. Following that, he peddled with a horse and buggy. In 1933 he launched his own business, clearing and filling the swampy land by hand to build a multi-generation business, Rosen and Sons, which eventually moved into industrial waste.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Places
Kitchener (Ont.)
Russia
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 55 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1919-1939, [ca. 2005]
Scope and Content
Accession consists primarily of photographs documenting the early life of Bella Wilder (née Goldbach) and her family in Poland. Included are images of Bella with her siblings and friends, group photos of Bella at her Jewish school in Poland, a group image of Victor in the Polish army, and other photographs of Bella's family and friends. Also included are two family histories documenting the story of Bella's mother, Shifra Frimeth Goldbach, and the story of Max and Bella Wilder, which was written by their granddaughter Sandee Sharpe. Of particular note is a 1925 school photograph of the Workers Evening School in Opatow (?), which has Yiddish writing suggesting that the school may have received aid from an organization referred to as "Gives Relief" in Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were originally donated to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto section) by Bella's daughter Ann Sharpe. JGS Toronto donated the material to the OJA a few months later with her consent.
Administrative History
Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder was born on May 12, 1910 in Opatow, Poland to Chaim Shlomo Goldbach and Shifra Frimeth Schatz Goldbach. Bella's older brothers, Victor, Jack and Hymie began immigrating to Toronto in the 1920s and had saved enough money by 1936 to bring Bella and her mother to Toronto. After arriving in Toronto Bella found work sewing in a factory.
Bella married Max Wilder on September 29, 1939. Max worked at Superior Men's Tailoring where he sewed zippers into men's pants. They had two children together: Ann (born 5 April 1940, married Norman Sharpe) and Stan (born 21 Jan. 1945, died June 1974). Max passed away in 1999 and Bella passed away in 2002.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Goldbach, Shifra
Sharpe, Ann
Wilder, Bella, 1910-2002
Wilder, Max, ?-1999
Places
Poland
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-1-5
Material Format
textual record
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
3 objects
Date
[190-?]-1967
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials documenting the Grosman family, in particular Max Grosman. Included are Max's certificate of naturalization, various Polish-language documents including Max's Polish passport, an old age security application, and an insurance book. The accession also includes a pin commemorating the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union's fortieth anniversary and two rings that belonged to Max.
Custodial History
Max Grosman's son, Wilfred Grosman, came into possession of the records constituting Accession 2018-1-5 following the death of his father. He donated the records to the Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre on 17 January 2018.
Administrative History
Max Grosman was born 25 March 1884 in Novoradomsk, Poland. He became a naturalized British subject in 1914. Max's wife, Minnie "Majja" Grosman (née Bocian), came to Canada in 1913. Together, they had four sons: Jack, Morris, Samuel, and Wilfred. Max made his living as a tailor. He passed away on 17 October 1960 at the age of seventy-seven.
Descriptive Notes
LANGUAGE: Accession contains records in both English and Polish.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Bocian, Majja
Bocian, Minnie
Grosman, Majja
Grosman, Minnie
Grosman, Max
Grosman, Wilfred
International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-11-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-11-9
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1922–1953
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Cohen family. Included are an agreement between Moses Nepomjesze and J. L. Shekter dated 18 April 1922 regarding the bringing of three individuals–Hannah Nepomjesze and, A. Yudel Nepomjesze, and Raphuel Nepomjesze–to Toronto on or before 20 July 1922; an unsigned document in which Goldie Sherman appoints Moses Nepomjesze (Cohen) as her attorney; an agreement made in duplicate on 17 July 1922 between Morris Cohen and Jas. L. Shekter; landing cards for Chana Niepomieszcze (the donor's grandmother) and Rafael Niepomieszcze (the donor's father) stamped 14 September 1922; a receipt of payment for $6 dated 29 December 1931 and issued to Morris Cohen; an undated application for vise [sic] form with Chana's signature in Yiddish; a youth aliyah certificate of honour issued to Mrs. M. Cohen in May 1942; a sworn oath dated 9 June `1953 by Benjamin Sherman saying he knew Morris Cohen as Moshe Gersch Nepomyashtski Berkovitch when he resided in Uman in Kiev, Russia; a sworn oath by Asher Olshinetsky saying he has known Morris for forty-two years; and the second page of a document signed by Goldie Herman and Jas L. Shekter.
Custodial History
Records were discovered in the house the donor's uncle, Harold Cohen, after he passed away.
Administrative History
Originally from Russia, Morris Cohen came to Canada in 1911. His wife, Chana, and son, Ralph (1911–2000), stayed behind until such time as Morris was able to bring them over. In 1922, Chana and Ralph made the trip to join Morris in Canada. Chana's visa application from that year gives her age as thirty-one and her son's age as nine. The same visa indicates that Morris was living at 537 Cannon Street in Hamilton, Ontario and that he was working as a merchant/tailor. Once in Canada, Morris and Chana had one more child, Harold. At some point, Morris, Chana, and their family relocated to 350 Euclid Avenue.
A note on names: Several of the individuals documented in the records changed their names. According to one record signed by an acquaintance of Morris' from Russia, Morris was originally named Moshe Gersch Nepomyashtski Berkovitch and changed his name Morris Cohen shortly after coming to Canada. In other records, the same individual is referred to as Moses Nepomjesze (Cohen). According to his granddaughter, Carol, Morris was told he could not keep his name and was given the surname Cohen–this despite the fact Morris was not a kohen. After arriving in Canada, Chana adopted her husband's new surname: a certificate issued to the former is made out to "Mrs. M. Cohen." In writing the above account, the archivist has used the names by which the individuals were best known.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Also available as PDF files.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Cohen (family)
Places
Ontario
Russia
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 117; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
117
Item
13
Material Format
textual record
Date
3 Aug. 1945
Physical Description
1 letter
Scope and Content
Item is a letter written in Polish, sent to Bella Hershenhorn from her sister Esther, who is living in a DP camp in Bergen. Included is a hand-written and typed translation.
Subjects
Holocaust survivors
Refugee camps
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Sarah Green
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
7 Jan. 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Sarah Green
Number
OH 4
Subject
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Neighborhoods
Interview Date
7 Jan. 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
38 minutes 44 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contOHt the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Sarah Green (née Patlik) grew up living in Toronto's Junction neighbourhood. The family home and scrap yard business were both located on Maria Street, which served as the centre for Jewish life in the Junction during the early 1900s. Sarah Patlik was involved with numerous charitable organizations including the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla and the Rubinoff and Naftolin Mishpocha.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Green, Sarah
Geographic Access
Kingston (Ont.)
Maria Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Portland Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Stanley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
West Toronto Junction (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 4 - Green\OH4_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
July 1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one DVD copy of a July 1985 interview of Dr. Stephen Speisman by the donor, recorded at the TJC Archives. Dr. Speisman discusses his family's connections with the Gold family because of their common background in Ostrow, Poland. He also talks about the socialist views of many Jewish immigrants, the factors influencing their desire to emigrate in the First World War era, their early experiences learning English, the reasons for Anglicizing their names, and the cultural values that Polish Jews brought to Canadian life.
Custodial History
DVD copy created from original videocassette created by the donor.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions: Any re-use requires written permission of the donor.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Socialism
Name Access
Speisman, Stephen A., 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Caplan was born on 4 February 1888, in Russia, to David and Ida Caplan. He settled in Canada in 1905. He married Sophie (née Gold) in 1910 and had four children: Arthur, Harold, Leonard and Evelyn (Herschorn).
Isadore was president of I. Caplan Limited, his realty company, which was located in the Caplan Building on Duncan Street. He was a founding member of Shaarei Shomayim Congregation and was on the board of directors for the Toronto Talmud Torah and the Mount Sinai Hospital. He was president of the Hebrew Free Loan Association of Toronto, and was affiliated with other organizations such as the Jewish Home for the Aged, Baycrest Hospital, the Primrose Club and the Mount Sinai Lodge AF & AM.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Caplan, which was used in the 1967 edition of the Who's Who in Canadian Jewry.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jacob Egit was born 27 August 1912, in Poland, the son of Moses and Shindel Egit. He married Clara (née Schwartzbard) and had three children: Mary (Betel), Ryszard and Mark.
After completing his schooling in Poland, he became a journalist and was a staff member of the Polish and Jewish press and active in communal work in pre-war Poland. After the Second World War, Egit became associated with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRA) and the Joint Distribution Committee, and took part in the rehabilitation of Jewish persons from DP camps. He later became director of a book publishing firm.
In 1958 he came to Toronto with his family and became the associate executive director of the Israel Histadrut Campaign, a member of the Speakers Bureau of the Canadian Jewish Congress, secretary of the Organization of the Jews from Poland and a member of the Executive of the Toronto Jewish Cultural Association.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Jacob Egit.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1965]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Green was born 22 September 1898, in Poland, the son of Younison and Rivka Green. He married Toby (née Goldman) and had three children: Goldie, Carl and Jerry.
Green was an active member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was the past president and secretary of the Ostrovtzer Congregation; president of the Adeth Israel Congregation in Oshawa; president of the Radomer Mutual Benefit Society; founder and secretary of the Radomer Co-operative Credit Association Ltd.; founder and treasurer of the Canadian Polish Farband; executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress Board; national recording secretary of the United Radomer Relief, USA and Canada; founder of the Warsaw Lodzer; founder of the Toronto branch of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society; founder of Beth Radom Congregation, and an active Israel Bonds salesman.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
30
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sarah (née Rawet) Mendly was born to Shapsa and Feiga Rawet. The family immigrated to Canada sometime around 1926. Sarah was the president of the Toronto Chapter of the B’nai Brith Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Herzl Zion Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital. Sarah Mendly was the wife of photographer, Gordon Mendly. She died on 31 December 1992.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Sarah Mendly in her husband's studio on College Street.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
David Green was born in 1897, in Kaminka, Poland, the son of Reb Chaim Shochet. In 1913, he immigrated with his family to Toronto, at the age of sixteen. Three years later he married Tilly (née Litowitz) and had three children: Hyman, Beulah and Esther.
Green was an active member of several Jewish organizations and clubs, such as the Palestine Lodge, and was president of the Hebrew National Association (Folks Farein), president of Beth Lida Congregation, vice-president of the Mount Sinai Cemetery Association, vice-president of the Jewish Public Library, vice-president of the College Memorial Chapel , vice-president of the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home, and was on the board of directors of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. Green died on 13 May 1977.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of David Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
35
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Harry Posen was born in 1908, in Pinsk, Poland, to Yakov Shleime and Ethel (née Stravietz) Posenitsky. He was married to Blanche (née Cohen) Spiegel Posen and had three children: Karen (Davidman), Stephen, and David. Blanche also had two other children from a previous marraige: Barry Spiegel and Joy (née Spiegel) Cohen. Harry Posen was the co-owner of a dental laboratory named Posen and Furie. He was a member of Holy Blossom Temple and Ontario Men's O.R.T. He died on 20 May 1985.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Harry Posen.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 48
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
48
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Kalmen Wagner was born on 12 October 1892, in Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland. He was married to Bina (née Wagner) and had three children: Harry, Sam and Charlie Goldman. Wagner was executive director of the Toronto Poalei Zion, and was active in Israel Histadrut. Wagner died on 16 August 1972, at the age of 79.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Kalmen Wagner.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 49
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
49
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Kurt Weinberg was born in Frankfurt on Mein, Germany in 1925, the son of Herman and Frieda (née Julich) Weinberg. In May 1939, he escaped to Manchester, England from Germany on the Kinder Transport. In 1946, he married his ex-wife, Miriam (née Reuben) and together they had one daughter, Lynda (Crayston). In 1949, Weinberg immigrated to Toronto with his family and attended the School of Social Sciences at the University of Toronto.
Weinberg has held several positions with Jewish communal organizations such as: the Zionist Organization of Canada, Central Region; the United Israel Appeal campaign in Ontario; Education Planning Committee of the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Toronto; campaign secretary of the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto; and executive director of the Jewish National Fund of Canada, Central Region for over nineteen years.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Kurt Weinberg.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
1928-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of David Waserman's Polish passport, Canadian immigration identification card stamped at Halifax upon his arrival on the Megantic, two copies of his birth certificate, a Polish police clearance document, and an army service book. There is also a Polish passport for Syma Nachsztern and her immigration identification card stamped upon arrival on the SS United States.
MG_RG
MG1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Waserman, David
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 4 cm
Date
1921
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and a passport photograph pertaining to the immigration of Joseph Kalman Wainryb (Wajnryb) age 17 from Warsaw, Poland to Toronto in 1921.These include his passport, legal and medical certificates, and ship's cabin and landing cards.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wainryb, Joseph Kalman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2 May 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one booklet for the annual meeting of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada, Central Region held at Temple Sinai with guest speaker Mr. Gaynor Jacobson, Executive Vice-President of H.I.A.S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Jacobson, Gaynor
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Stephen Pincus
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Stephen Pincus
Number
OH 415
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Interviewer
Jessica Parker
Total Running Time
1 hr. 23 min.
Use Restrictions
Restriction noted by interviewee on video/oral history release form: The foregoing is subject to OJA obtaining my prior written consent prior to placing any of the interview on the internet (other than password protected communications)
Researches should be directed to the access copy created by Stephen Pincus.
Biography
Although he grew up in South Africa, Stephen was born in England where his father was studying. When they returned to South Africa in 1963, they visited Israel on the way, and five-year-old Stephen fell in love with the exotic, young Jewish state.
As a teenager, Stephen was OHtive in Habonim, South Africa’s largest Zionist youth movement and became head of that movement in the late 1970s, running the largest Jewish youth camp in the world. Stephen was also elected chair of South Africa’s Zionist Youth Council, the umbrella body for all-Jewish youth organizations in the country. He and his wife Michelle then moved to Israel with a Habonim group that established Kibbutz Tuval in the western Galilee.
In 1982 Stephen came to study in Toronto. He served as administrator of Bialik Hebrew Day School and as camp director of Camp Shalom, while completing MBA and LLB degrees, and was awarded the Gold Medal at Osgoode Hall Law School. Stephen and Michelle started a family and both their own parents immigrated to Toronto.
Stephen is a senior partner and executive committee member at Goodmans LLP, is widely regarded as one of Canada’s leading business lawyers, and has played a pioneering role in the development of the country’s capital markets. He is is the founding chair of the Canada Africa Chamber of Business, a director of Kew Media Group, a member of the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel, chair of the board of Makom, and founder of Kaleidoscope, a unique multi-dimensional Israel engagement program.
He and his wife Michelle; their two married children, Daniel and Lisa; granddaughter Olivia; and therapy dog Mannee all live in Toronto.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Pincus, Stephen, 1958-
Geographic Access
England
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:56 Stephen discusses his family background, including notable forebears, his grandparents' immigration in the early 1900s, and the largely Lithuanian composition of the South African Jewish community.
03:04 Stephen discusses his South-African-born parents' backgrounds and how they met.
05:14 Stephen mentions that he was born in England in 1958, while his family was abroad for his father's medical studies. He lived there until they returned to South Africa in 1964.
06:25 Stephen remembers arriving in South Africa and all the family that had come to greet them who hadn't seen his parents for eight years. He mentions that all correspondence happened via mail.
08:01 Stephen describes his family's relationship to Judaism: They were Orthodox in name, but took a pragmatic approach. Stephen went to public school and received a lot of his Jewish education from Habonim.
09:27 Stephen describes his bar mitzvah celebrations. Stephen remembers preparing his speech. He enjoys public speaking and this was a starting point.
10:49 Stephen talks about the Habonim youth movement. Stephen's involvement began in his early teens. He became the head of the movement in the late 1970s and ran the camp for a couple of years. Stephen is organizing a trip this summer to Israel for alumni of Habonim.
14:50 Stephen explains that he has a foot in South Africa, Canada, and Israel.
15:43 Stephen talks about the unique environment in South Africa that contributed to Zionism. He talks about the Soweto Uprising in 1976. Israel was a place where South African Jews could create something better. Stephen finds it ironic that some see in Israel a continuation of apartheid.
19:53 Stephen talks about his parents' view of his involvement in Habonim. He relates a story where his father became upset when Stephen participated in a march protesting a United Nations resolution instead of studying for an exam.
21:37 Stephen's father was risk-averse and practical. He wasn't keen on Stephen moving to Israel and would discourage his son indirectly. Stephen went to Israel anyway.
22:20 Stephen's parents did not give voice to strong political views. Stephen remembers being at a poetry reading at a friend's parents' house when he was eight. It was his first mixed-race experience. Stephen and his friends were politically active in high school and as undergraduate students.
24:27 Stephen explains how Zionism and Israel were his major focus while the South African situation was secondary. Stephen remembers visiting Soweto a number of times.
26:00 Stephen discusses the paradox of under apartheid while opposing it. He sees this as a central issue that white South Africans of his generation faced. He discusses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings of the 1990s.
28:24 Stephen recounts how Israel fell into the arms of South Africa after being pushed away by various African states in the 1970s.
29:03 Stephen describes his involvement in resuscitating Machon Le'Madrichei Chutz La'Aretz, a year-long leadership course for youth leaders in Israel. South African Jews would defer their army service to participate. In 1975, the South African government determined it would not let Jewish students defer for this purpose.
31:16 Stephen discusses his decision to leave South Africa.
32:51 Stephen discusses how not going on Machon is one of his regrets.
33:28 Stephen discusses the places he considered immigrating to. He was focused on going to Israel and was part of a group that went to live on a kibbutz in the western Galilee.
37:24 Stephen discusses previous trips to Israel. The first time he went to the country was when his family went from England to South Africa. This was before the Six-Day War and he remembers barbed wire in Jerusalem. Stephen thinks he probably fell in love with Israel at this time.
38:32 Stephen explains the meaning of the words machon and garin.
39:23 Stephen describes the kupah meshutefet ("common treasury box") economic system. The system didn't last very long.
40:16 Stephen describes how his family and friends reacted to the news that he was making aliyah.
41:09 Stephen discusses a car trip he and his wife took throughout South Africa. He relates how they were caught in a flood and ended up being taken in by a black family. Stephen reflects on the irony of their situation.
44:07 Stephen discusses he and his wife's arrival in Israel. Stephen was accepted by Hebrew University to study law. Ultimately, he and his wife chose to move to Toronto at the beginning of 1982.
45:06 Stephen shares what he brought with him to Toronto from South Africa.
47:20 Stephen discusses his initial trip to Canada in January 1982. He thinks that it was the coldest winter Toronto experienced until 2014. He discusses some of the hurdles he faced adjusting to the new climate.
51:33 Stephen discusses settling in Canada and going to school.
56:25 Stephen discusses opening an issue of the Canadian Jewish News and seeing that a summer camp was looking for a director. He was director for a couple of years and he and his wife would spend their summer at the camp.
57:05 Stephen discusses how Habonim was different from Camp Shalom, the camp he worked at in Canada.
58:24 Stephen discusses his transition from being involved in a Zionist and socialist youth movement to ending up in business and corporate law. He notes that he has shifted in a number of respects in terms of his perspective on economic values, social values, and religious values.
1:02:55 Stephen discusses his experience integrating into Canadian society.
1:05:20 Stephen contrasts his parents' experience coming later in life with his own experience. They had a wonderful time when they came because there was a large community of retired South African expatriates by then.
1:09:54 Stephen discusses the role of the local Jewish community, and local South African Jewish community, played in his acclimatization.
1:11:59 Stephen discusses how he came to work for Goodmans.
1:14:17 Stephen discusses the differences he has noticed between Canadians and South Africans. He feels that South Africans as a group tend to be more direct than Canadians. In his opinion, South Africans lie somewhere between Israelis and Canadians in terms of directness.
1:17:51 Stephen discusses his journey, coming from a secular Zionist background and starting a program of Jewish learning later in life.
1:20:40 Stephen discusses his own approach to keeping Jewish traditions and customs. He is observant, but not dogmatic.
1:26:11 Stephen discusses his two children. His son is a medical resident and his daughter is finishing up a law/business administration program.
1:27:09 Stephen discusses synagogues he is involved with.
1:29:10 Stephen discusses cultural differences he has experienced raising his children in Canada.
1:33:04 Stephen explains the decisions he and his wife made regarding their children's education.
1:35:15 Stephen describes his children's relationships with their grandparents.
1:37:31 Stephen answers the question, "Do you feel Canadian?"
1:41:55 Stephen discusses his involvement with the Canada-South Africa Chamber of Business.
1:42:42 Stephen discusses the differences in being involved with the ex-South African community more broadly and the ex-South African Jewish community.
1:44:58 Stephen discusses his children's connections to South Africa, which he says are quite limited.
1:46:37 Stephen shares food words and expressions that he shared with his children and which they now use.
1:47:55 Stephen offers a few final remarks about his decision to immigrate to Canada and the relationship between Canadian identity, Jewish/Israeli identity, and South African identity.
Source
Oral Histories

Israel, the Opportunity for New Beginnings

An Indoor Life

Name
Karrie Weinstock
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Karrie Weinstock
Number
OH 435
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 435 part 1: 22 min.
OH 435 part 2: 11 min.
OH 435 part 3: 22 min.
OH 435 part 4: 5 min.
Biography
Karrie’s life has long been characterized by both privilege and an acute sensitivity to the challenges facing those less fortunate than herself. Although she grew up in a happy professional family, her childhood was marked by uncertainty. Her father, Jack Unterhalter, was a civil rights lawyer in the Apartheid era, active in left-wing politics, and Karrie recalls him keeping a packed briefcase by the door during the state of emergency in case the authorities should come for him.
As a young woman, Karrie studied to be an English teacher at Homerton College, Cambridge. She then returned to South Africa, where she taught for two years, before moving to Boston to pursue a master’s degree in educational administration, planning and social policy at Harvard. Upon graduating, she took a position at Milton OHademy, an independent school in Boston. She enjoyed her time there but chose to relocate to Toronto, where she had an aunt. For over three decades, she has worked at Branksome Hall, first as an English teacher, then as an administrator, and now in her current role as deputy principal.
In 1985, Karrie married Michael Weinstock, a native Torontonian, whose family embraced her as one of their own. Both Karrie and Michael had been married previously and through her marriage to Michael, she inherited three beautiful stepdaughters. Karrie and Michael had a child of their own, a son who shares his mother’s love of South Africa, visiting the country each year.
Recognizing her great fortune in life, Karrie gives back through her volunteer work with the Stephen Leacock Foundation, which, among other initiatives, supports low-fee independent schools in South Africa that are connected to independent and public schools in Canada so as to form a unique Triangle of Hope.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Weinstock, Karen
Geographic Access
Boston (Mass.)
Cambridge (England)
Jamestown (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Karrie outlines her immediate family. She was born in Johannesburg, South Africa.
01:28 Karrie discusses her family history. Her maternal grandfather was born in 1891 in Lithuania. He came to South Africa in 1914 to escape the military. Her maternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Lithuania. Her paternal grandfather was born in 1888 in Poland. Her paternal grandmother, whose parents came from Lithuania, was born in London in 1893.
03:54 Karrie discusses her father's career as a civil rights lawyer. She discusses her father's role as a founding member of the Liberal Party in South Africa.
06:35 Karrie discusses the impOHt her father's political OHtivism had on her family. She offers examples to illustrate the unique situation in her home while growing up (e.g. political meetings, fear of her father's imminent arrest, visits from political prisoners).
08:26 Karrie offers her impressions of the position taken by the greater Jewish community in South Africa.
09:27 Karrie explains why she and her siblings attended independent schools.
11:00 Karrie discusses her family's involvement in the Jewish community and Jewish prOHtice.
13:15 Karrie discusses how her parents stressed the importance of education and viewed education as a means of leaving South Africa. She discusses the education paths of her siblings as well as her own. Karrie received her teaching qualifications at Cambridge and earned a master's degree in administration planning and social policy at Harvard.
15:34 Karrie lives in Canada. Her sister lives in London. Her brother opted to return to South Africa.
16:38 Karrie relates an anecdote that compares her current situation of seeing her mother once a year with Black workers in South Africa who saw their children once a year.
17:48 Karrie explains that both her sister and brother were unable to return to South Africa for a period of time. In her sister's case it was due to her political activity; in her brother's case, it was due to his refusal to serve in the military.
18:55 Karrie discusses her "charmed" life growing up.
20:54 Karrie discusses her teaching qualifications and first teaching position at an independent school for mixed-race students.
Part 2:
00:56 Karrie discusses her experience at Harvard. Specifically, she mentions a friendship.
06:09 Karrie explains why her parents preferred that she not return to South Africa.
07:09 Karrie relates the story of finding a job at Milton Academy in Boston following graduation.
Part 3:
00:00 Karrie explains how she decided to move to Toronto.
03:45 Karrie explains how she became engaged and married to Clive Lovett in 1979. She explains the factors that contributed to the end of their four-year marriage.
05:16 Karrie discusses her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Branksome Hall.
12:59 Karrie describes meeting and marrying Michael Weinstock. Michael has three children from a previous marriage. Karrie and Michael have one son together.
15:20 Karrie explains how Peter Oliver, a prominent South African-born Toronto philanthropist and businessman, arranged to fund and build an independent school, the Get-Ahead Project School in rural South Africa. She explains her involvement with the project and the connection with Branksome Hall, Rose Avenue Public School, a high-needs school in Toronto, and the Get-Ahead Project School in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Karrie continues to describe the inter-school program that has been set up for students at Branksome Hall, a school in Jamestown; Toronto, and the Get-Ahead school.
02:26 Karrie discusses her role on the board of the Leacock Foundation and her opportunity to further the inter-school program. She cites an example of how they contributed to the Get-Ahead school.
04:17 Karrie reminisces about times when she felt Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

A Triangle of Hope

A Packed Suitcase by the Door

A Charmed Existence

Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 4; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
4
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1970]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Nat Hennick was born in Poland to Molly and William Hennick. The family immigrated to Canada shortly after his birth. Nathan Hennick was a member of Beth Tzedec Synagogue.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Mr. Nat Hennick.
Name Access
Hennick, Nat
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Related Material
see Photo #51 for Irving Hennick
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1541
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1541
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Accession Number
1978-4-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4760
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4760
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1904
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Notes
For details, please see accession record.
Name Access
Alexandroff, Boris
West Toronto
Junction
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1989-3-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2529
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2529
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1908 or 1909]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Abraham Walerstein came from Europe alone. This photo was taken to send back to his family.
Notes
Photo by Wilfrid Joron, 69 St. Lawrence St., Montreal.
Name Access
Walerstein, Abraham
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Accession Number
1981-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 210
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
210
Material Format
textual record
Date
1964
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence regarding Boris Sperberg, an immigrant to Canada from Russia who allegedly informed on Jews to the NKVD in Russia.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Material Format
sound recording (electronic)
Physical Description
1 audio recording : mp3
Date
[ca. 1982]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one audio recording of an oral history interview conducted by Mike Culiner with his father Harry Culiner. The interview was conducted in San Francisco in the early 1980s. In the interview Harry describes his early life in Russia and in the Russian army, his immigration to Canada and early life here.
Custodial History
The original cassette tapes are in the possession of Jill Culiner, the granddaughter of Harry and niece of Mike. Jill is the daughter of Jack Culiner. She digitized the cassette tape and brought the digitial file into us.
Administrative History
Harry was born around 1885 in Privitnoye (Russia). Around 1904 he went into the Russian army and soon after immigrated to Ontario. He initially worked on the railway in South Porcupine and Cochrane. Around 1918 he moved to St. Catharines and eventually moved from there to the Junction area of Toronto. He opened a menswear shop at 2996 Dundas Street West and lived above the shop. He married Milder Culiner and they had four children together: Alex (b. 1911), Jack (or John) (1913-2013), Norman (b. around 1915), and Mike (b. around 1917). Harry passed away in 1985 or 1986.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Culiner, Harry
Places
Russia
South Porcupine, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the immigration and settlement of Max Smith (Szmidt, Szmit, Szmita) and Pearl (nee Apelbaum?) Smith and their family. Included are Polish identification papers and correspondence with Canadian immigration officials. Also included is correspondence relating to Alexander Najmanowicz.
Custodial History
The records were found by UJA Federation employee Leanne Campbell while she was cleaning out her office for a move. She believes the records belonged to someone who had her office before her. The original owner/source of the records is unknown.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Polish and English.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Smith, Max
Smith, Pearl
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[1946?]-1951
Scope and Content
Accession includes an undated document describing immigration prospects following the Second World War and the anti-immigration sentiment. The document was published by an unknown group "interested in combating race-hatred and anti-Semitism and on strengthening the unity between the groups which make up the people of Canada". In addition, there is a copy of a confidential letter dated February 14, 1951 listing immigrants identified as skilled workers and selected by overseas Canadian immigration officials under the auspices of the Settlement Branch to settle in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. These immigrants were to arrive in Halifax on the above noted date of on board the SS Staveangerfgord.
Custodial History
File discovered while processing CJC fonds 17.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1993-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of meeting minutes of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC). The earliest minutes are from 8 May 1993; the latest minutes are from 12 January 1998.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-11
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1923-1930
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records doumenting Sarah Clodman's immigration to Canada. Included is Clodman's Certificate of Naturalization; Clodman's passport from the USSR; and landing card from Clodman's immigration to Canada as well as a Red Star Line Baths inspection card containing a final inspection stamp given in Antwerp.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 certificate
Date
Oct. 2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one citation for citizenship from the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, awarded posthumously to Eugene Winter for community service settling Hungarian Jewish refugees.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Winter, Eugene, 1910-1995
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Material Format
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
2 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an interview and corresponding transcript, with Jack Shindman, past-president of JIAS, on immigration and his family.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Shindman, Jack
Drutz, Danny
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Rovno, Ukraine
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1971
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Number
OH 161
OH 162
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1971
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Eva Kayfetz and Stephen Spiesman
Total Running Time
OH161 Side 1: 47 minutes OH161 Side 2: 47 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Toronto Historical Society lecture
Use Restrictions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Esther Volpe (née Shulman) was born on 24 February circa 1898. As a child, she and her family briefly lived in Romington, Ontario and Havlock, Ontario. Her family later settled in Toronto. In her youth, she participated in the Herzl Girls' Club. She attended University of Toroonto in the Faculty of Arts. She married Dr. Aaron Volpe in 1921. Esther was involved in several Jewish organizations, including the old Mount Sinai Medical Auxillary, Council of Jewish Women, Hadassah, UJA Appeal, JIAS and BBYO and non-Jewish organizations, including Toronto Local Council of Women. She represented the Jewish community of Toronto on the Wartime Price and Trade Board and helped organize the Ontario Food Council.
Ida Siegel (née Lewis) (1885–1982) was born on 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto, which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Volpe, Esther
Siegel, Ida
Kayfetz, Eva
Speisman, Stephen
Hadassah-WIZO
National Council of Jewish Women
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In 1947, Esther Volpe was elected President of the National Council of Jewish Women. In this clip, Esther discusses how, with the support of the United Welfare Fund, the Canadian Jewish Congress and JIAS, she helped make arrangements for groups of Jewish refugees who settled in Toronto.

In this clip, Esther Volpe explains her involvement in the creation of the "Good Age Club" the first recreational program for Jewish seniors.

In this clip, Ida Siegel relates anecdotes from her childhood growing up in downtown Toronto.

Name
Blanche Haber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
18 Dec. 1987
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Blanche Haber
Number
OH 189
Subject
Boardinghouses
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Occupations
Interview Date
18 Dec. 1987
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Kaylee Gollom Miller
Total Running Time
Side 1 - 31 minutes Side 2 - 31 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Blanche Haber (née Heller) was born in a small town in Russia in 1893. She came to Toronto at age eight. Her father worked as a peddler. She married Isadore Haber in 1915. Three of her five children died from illness in their childhood. Before her marriage, Blanche worked as a seamstress. Isadore worked as a tailor, primarily for Eaton's. Like her mother, Blanche took boarders into her home at 112 Parliament Street once married.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Haber, Blanche, 1893-1994
Haber, Isadore, 1887-1982
Manischewitz (family)
Geographic Access
Halifax (N.S.)
Parliament Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 189 Haber\OH 189 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Blanche Haber describes taking boarders into her mother’s and her own home at 112 Parliament Street.

In this clip, Blanche Haber fondly remembers the warm relationship that developed between her family and the Manischewitz family. She explains that Joe Manischewitz boarded at her family’s home while his family built a matzah factory in Toronto.

Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Number
OH 419
Subject
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Occupations
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 34 min.
Biography
Hilton and Shirley were born in Durban, South Africa in 1951. Although both were involved in the Habonim youth movement, the two did not meet until their first year in pharmacy school. After getting married and serving a brief stint in the military, Hilton left with Shirley on a trip overseas that included Europe and the United Sates, but whose ultimate purpose was the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Upon arriving in Montreal, the couple decided Canada would be a good place to live. By that point, they had resolved that they did not want their children to internalize the racial norms of apartheid South Africa. Cementing their decision was the fact Shirley’s sister was accepted into Canada shortly after the two returned to South Africa.
Hilton and Shirley’s immigration to Canada was complicated by the fact they were regarded by the government as students, not full-fledged pharmacists. When they came to Canada in August 1977, they therefore had to qualify as pharmacists, which they did by attending university while holding down full-time jobs as pharmacy technicians. Once certified, they moved to Dundas, where they opened a series of pharmacies and raised their children.
In 2007, the couple sold their Day Night Pharmacy chain to Rexall Pharma Plus. In 2014 Hilton and Shirley relocated to Toronto and now spend their time between Toronto and Vancouver to be close to their children and grandchildren.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Silberg, Hilton, 1951-
Silberg, Shirley, 1951-
Geographic Access
Dundas (Ont.)
Durban (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:38 Shirley was born in Durban, South Africa in 1951.
00:44 Shirley discusses her family history. Her maternal grandparents came to Durban in early 1800s from England. They married in South Africa. Her paternal grandparents came to Durban from Lithuania in the late 1800s. They married in South Africa. Her father was a physician specializing in physical medicine; her mother worked as his secretary.
03:31 Shirley describes her privileged early home life.
04:26 Shirley attended Hebrew day school.
05:06 Shirley describes her education and involvement in sports.
07:28 Shirley attended the Habonim youth movement.
08:13 Shirley discusses her early memories of politics and apartheid.
09:57 Shirley describes the impact an overseas trip to Europe and Israel had on her.
12:34 Shirley explains that she and Hilton considered immigrating to Canada and Israel. Her sister had immigrated to Canada and her brother had immigrated to England.
13:31 Hilton and Shirley attended the pharmacy school in Durban.
14:48 Hilton and Shirley married and moved to Johannesburg. Hilton completed mandatory service in the army.
15:37 Hilton was born in Durban on 26 October 1951. He discusses his family history. His maternal grandparents came from Lithuania. His mother was born in South Africa. His father's family came from Lithuania. His father was born in Lithuania. Hilton shares a story about his paternal grandmother's voyage from Lithuania to Pretoria with five children. When his parents were married they moved to Durban in the mid-1950s.
17:46 Hilton discusses his parents. His mother was an occasional secretary. His father was initially a tool and diemaker. Later, he worked in business. Hilton notes that his father was a semi-professional football player.
20:30 Hilton explains that his mother had a strong Jewish identity, but was not religious.
21:06 Hilton discusses his education in public school and Hebrew school.
21:58 Hilton reminisces about his childhood.
23:25 Hilton discusses how he and his sister became competitive ballroom dancers.
25:50 Hilton discusses his bar mitzvah training.
27:02 Hilton was active in the Habonim youth movement.
27:31 Hilton shares his impressions growing up under apartheid. He discusses discrimination, restrictions, and censorship.
30:33 Hilton discusses his mandatory military service.
36:22 Hilton and Shirley discuss how they met and dated.
37:45 Hilton discusses some of the factors that triggered the couple's decision to leave South Africa.
43:07 Hilton and Shirley describe how they struggled to accumulate money before leaving South Africa.
44:12 Hilton describes the efforts made to secure work and a visa for entry into Canada.
48:31 Hilton and Shirley describe the sentiments that surrounded their departure from South Africa.
49:40 Hilton and Shirley arrived in Canada on 25 August 1977.
50:30 Shirley shares anecdotes about her first experiences with household chores.
54:20 Hilton and Shirley discuss their few acquaintances/contacts when they first arrived in Canada.
55:40 Hilton explains how his outlook has changed since he moved to Canada.
57:41 Shirley describes the challenges of juggling work and pharmacy classes at the University of Toronto. Hilton and Shirley share some examples of cultural differences between Canada and South Africa.
1:01:05 Hilton and Shirley worked as pharmaceutical technicians.
1:03:53 Hilton explains how they became partners in a pharmacy in Dundas, Ontario. Hilton and Shirley discuss how they settled in and were welcomed into the Jewish community.
1:10:05 Hilton and Shirley brought Hilton's two sisters, brother, parents, and Shirley's mother to Canada.
1:11:02 Hilton explains the circumstances that led to a split with his partners. He changed the name of the pharmacy from Amherst Pharmacy to Hilton Pharmacy. He describes the growth of the business.
1:18:00 Hilton describes the expansion and success of the business to five pharmacies.
1:20:12 Hilton discusses his involvement in the Jewish and secular communities in Dundas.
1:20:57 In 2007, the business was purchased by Rexall.
1:21:33 Shirley explains the circumstances that prompted their move to Toronto via Vancouver.
1:23:55 Shirley describes a return visit to South Africa with her two youngest children.
1:25:22 Hilton reminisces about a family trip to London and South Africa in 1980.
1:27:08 Hilton describes his discomfort during a visit to Durban, South Africa in 1986.
1:28:40 Shirley relates an anecdote that occurred during their family trip to South Africa.
1:30:46 Hilton reflects on how much he appreciates being in Canada.
1:32:50 Shirley identifies becoming Canadian citizens as a turning point in their new life in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

https://vimeo.com/230208590

Immigration Tribulations

Who Has Left Over Matzah Balls?

The First Midnight Store

Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
ID
Item 3790
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Leonard Berger fonds
Level
Item
Item
3790
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1897
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of the Rottenberg family taken in a studio in 1897, shortly after the time they arrived in Canada. It includes from left to right: Bertha, Goldie, Lena (in front), Louis, Lazer and Rebecca.
Notes
For further identification, see accession record.
Name Access
Rotenberg family
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1985-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-2
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 100 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1920-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of the Hersch family, a screenplay by Phillip Hersch, school certificates from Landsdowne School, Canadian naturalization certificates, thank you notes, a New Year's greeting card, and a Polish passport. Included are photographs of weddings, Europe vacations, class photos, houses in Toronto, bar mitzvah, Niagara falls, Channukah, Farms, studio sets, the beach, and snow scenes.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Norman Hersch until his death in the mid-1980s, at which point the donor took possession of the records and stored them until donating them to the OJA in March 2015.
Administrative History
Norman Hersch was a special effects technician for the CBC from the early 1950s until his retirement in the mid-1980s. He was married to a French woman from Western Canada named Margaret. He is buried in the Mount Albert area with his wife. He served in the Canadian military during the Second World War and graduated from Central Technical School upon his return. In later years, he started P & M Display in Yorkville. Norman's older brother Phillip was a screenwriter in Toronto. He wrote the CBC series Wojek. Their mother Lily (Polish) volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital. Their father Alexander (Romanian) worked in stainless steel manufacturing. They lived around Cecil Street. Doug Wardle was a friend and colleague of Hersch's at CBC in the Special Effects Department.
Subjects
Bar mitzvah
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Hersch, Norman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of graphic material and textual records
Date
1925-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Kirschner family, in particular Maurice and Gertrude Kirschner. Included are family photographs, wedding telegrams, marriage certificates, certificates of naturalization, and passports. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Ann Kirschner, Chaim Kirschner, Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor), Hannah Kirschner, Helen Kirschner, Joseph Kirschner, Maurice Kirschner, Shlomo Kirschner, Ruth Lowe, Bernice Taylor, Leah Taylor, and Saul Taylor.
Administrative History
Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor) was born on 29 November 1907 in Toronto, Ontario. She lived with her parents at 770 Markham Street and finished high school. On 3 July 1932, she married Maurice Kirschner, with whom she had two daughters: Helen (b. 1934) and Elaine (b. 1942). The couple lived at 770 Markham Street until they bought their first home at 46 Gloucester Grove. They became founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue on Englinton Avenue. Gertrude died 7 June 1982.
Maurice Kirschner was born on 13 August 1904 in Lyck, Germany. He was trained as a watchmaker and opened a watch repair shop on Bay Street, just north of Queen. The shop was demolished to make way for the new city hall. Maurice subsequently went to work for Sayvette, where he remained for the rest of his career. He died on 15 February 1980.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Digital copies (jpg, tif) have been created for thirty-one documents.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Married people
Name Access
Kirschner (family)
Kirschner, Gertrude
Kirschner, Maurice
Places
Germany
Ontario
Soviet Union
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
21
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
Mordecai Gelber (1867–1930) was the older brother of Moses Gelber and Louis Gelber, who were prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community. He immigrated to Canada from Galicia, Austria in 1920 with his children Isaac, Rosa, and Abraham. Mordecai’s first wife, Beulah Rotenberg, passed away before he and the children came to Canada. In 1921, he was married to L. Kleinman. Mordecai was a retail grocer at 45 Grange in Toronto. He and his family belonged to the Kiever Shul. Mordecai passed away on 25 April 25 1930 from pulmonary tuberculosis.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of the Mordecai Gelber family.
Name Access
Gelber family
Gelber, Mordecai
Kiever Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Stulberg, Mrs.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
Good.
Places
45 Grange Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
34 photographs (tiff)
Date
[between 1914 and 1916?], 1986-1998
Scope and Content
Accssion consists of photographs documenting the Levine family's immigration to Canada and activities in Saskatchewan and Ontario. Included are images of Mark and Bev during their first few years in Melford, Saskatchewan, family holiday celebrations (Chanukah and Pesach dinners), shabbat dinners, the Edenbridge synagogue, trips to Niagara Falls, and images taken during trips Elfreda and Alec made to Canada from South Africa to visit Mark. Of note are images taken of Mark and Bev with other South African immigrants at a ski hill in Saskatchewan and at shabbat dinners in Melford. Also included is a Sweiden family portrait taken in South Africa in the early 1900s.
Administrative History
Leible and Esther Sweiden moved from Lithuania to Capetown in 1890. Leible's brother, Jacob followed him to Capetown around 1902. In 1906, Jacob and his wife Fanny (nee Vickers) immigrated with a small group of other Jewish South Africans to Edenbridge, Saskatchewan. Leible remained in South Africa. Leible's son Israel married Edith (Eadie) in 1934. Israel and Edith's daughter Elfreda (b. 1936) married Alec Levine in 1958. Elfreda was a bookkeeper for various companies and Alec worked for his family's plumbing business. They had three children together: Mark (b. 1959), Carol (b. 1962), and Adrian ( b. 1966).
Mark Levine married Beverley in 1983. They immigrated to Melford, Saskatchewan in 1986. Mark did not know at the time that his great grandfather's brother had immigrated to a nearby area decades earlier and only learned of his story and the Edenbridge Jewish community soon after arriving there. Mark worked as a physician at a local hospital. Beverley had been a pharmacist in South Africa, however, her qualifications were not recognized in Canada and she focused on raising her family. Mark and Bev's daughter, Romi, was born in August 1987. After 18 months in Melford, they moved to Toronto after Mark found work as a pediatric anesiologist at Sick Kids Hospital. In 1998, thier second daughter, Jade, was born. Mark's parents, Elfreda and Alec, immigrated to Toronto in 1999. Mark and other relatives encouraged them to immigrate due to the increasingly dangerous political situation in South Africa. Mark is also an assoicate professor at the University of Toronto. Alec and Elfreda's daughter Carol lives in England and their son Adrian remains in South Africa.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Levine, Mark
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
10 photographs
21 photographs (tiff)
Date
1957-2015, predominant 1987-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Colin and Brenda Baskind. Included are family photographs, such as a wedding portrait of Colin and Brenda, images of family events, graduation portraits of Colin's children, family holiday celebrations, Colin and Brenda running marathons, and the family at a baby naming ceremony for Colin's granddaughter at Darchei Noam Synanagoue. Textual records include thank you letters Colin received from individuals he assisted as President of SAJAC and in other capacities, the CV that Colin used to look for work in Toronto while preparing to immigrate from South Africa, a speech Brenda delivered to a cancer support group regarding her fight with breast cancer and marathon running, newsclippings, certificates, and letters of reference for both Colin and Brenda.
Identified in the photographs are: Colin Baskind, Brenda Baskind, Alan Sandler, Ian Sandler, Lorraine Sandler, Cliff Baskind, Stacey Baskind, Audrey Weinberg, Gerald Weinberg, Solly Simmons, Renee Simmons, Lily Shaie Baskind, Alana Baskind, and Refton Blair.
Administrative History
Colin Baskind was born in Johannesburg, South Africa, on April 20, 1943. As a child, he attended an all boys' school and played a wide variety of sports including, soccer, cricket and rugby. He studied commerce at the University of South Africa and completed a business course through a school in England. While in school he met his future wife, Brenda, on a blind date and they married in 1967. Together they had three children: Stacey, Alana and Cliff.
Colin worked in an import business and Brenda was a nursery school teacher. For a short period of time they cared for the nephew of their maid, whose daughter gave birth at a young age and was still in school. They raised him with their children until his mother was finished school.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda started to think about leaving South Africa due to the worsening violence and political situation. After first considering Australia, they eventually immigrated to Toronto in 1987. Colin found work in the importing business and Brenda found work at Holy Blossom Temple school. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Colin became involved in the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. He attended a meeting that had been called to resuscitate SAJAC (the organization, which was formed in 1977, had ceased functioning and there was a need to bring it back to help a new large wave of immigrants). At the meeting Colin was nominated as President and he has held this role ever since. Colin also volunteered with a variety of organizations including, JIAS and JVS. He continued with his athletic pursuits in Canada and jogged, hiked, and cycled in all weather. Around 1998, Brenda started to join Colin and his running group on jogs. Around 2000 they both began running in marathons. By 2015, they had participated in 11 marathons. In 2010, their granddaughter Lily Shaie was born to their daughter Stacey.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Baskind, Colin
Places
Johannesburg
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-3-8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
18 photographs : tiff
Date
1969, 1974-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Cohen family, their immigration to Canada from South Africa and life in Toronto. Textual records include photocopies of correspondence and paperwork relating to the Cohen's immigration, certificates, and a typed document containing humorous stories their South African friends shared at a "10 Years Out Of Africa" party relating to their adjustment to Canadian life. Also included are family portraits and photographs documenting family celebrations such as, weddings and bar mitzvahs. Of note is an image of Vivien and John at the "10 Years Out of Africa" party.
Administrative History
John Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1944 to Phil and Flora Cohen. Vivien (nee Lehwess) Cohen was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1947 to Henry and Isle (nee Wronsky) Lehwess. John's cousin was in physiotherapy school with Vivien and they were introduced to each other. They married on Dec. 3, 1969 and had three children together: Nicole (b. 1972), Steven (b. 1974), and Jeremy David (1979). Vivien was a physiotherapist and John was a textile sales agent. Due to the unstable political situation in South Africa, they immigrated to North York in March 1977. For the first few weeks, they lived in a rental apartment in North York. They soon moved into a townhouse nearby. In 1980, they bought their first house in Thornhill. They were both able to continue in their professions after immigrating to Canada. Both of their mothers and many of their friends also moved to Toronto. John and Vivien were members of Shaarei Shalom synagogue for twenty-five years and are now members of Darchei Noam.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Cohen, John
Places
Johannesburg, South Africa
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-10-6
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs (tiff) : b&w
Date
1897-1960, 1993
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the activities of Eli Bloch. Included are photocopies of correspondence, newsclippings, Eli's Canadian certificate of naturalization, travel documents, South African licenses, and a genealogical family tree for the Bloch family. Also included are two photographs of Eli in his later years.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Gerry Bloch, the grandson of Eli Bloch. Gerry is the son of Eli's son Norman.
Administrative History
Eli (Elias) Bloch was born in 1872 to Nokhum Tevel Rabinovitch in Kishinev Moldava. He had four siblings: Golda, Joseph, Samuel and Bertha. In the 1890s Eli and his siblings (with the exception of Golda) immigrated to South Africa. Bertha married Theodore Dissler (an importer/exporter). During the Boer War, Eli and his brother Joseph fought with the Dutch. After the war, Dissler employed Eli in his business. In 1907, Dissler sent Eli to sell ostrich feathers in various cities around the world, including: London (England), Montreal and Toronto. While in Toronto, Eli attended the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation Adath Israel where he met his future wife Leah Madnok and chose to remain in Ontario, without completing his task of selling ostrich feathers in the remaining cities on his itinerary. He married Leah in 1909. From about 1911 until 1922, Eli and Leah lived in Gravenhurst and ran a general store on the main street. They had four children together: Harry (1912-1945), Rose (1914-1994), Rachel (Rae) (1916-2000), and Norman (1916-1989). Rachel and Norman were twins.
In 1922, Elias and Leah moved to Mactier and opened a general store. By 1926, Leah and the children were living in London, ON and Elias continued to operate the general store. He saw the family regularly. Around 1935, Elias left Mactier. He remained in London until he moved to Toronto in 1942. Elias passed away in Toronto in 1960.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, and Russian
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-51
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2006
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a copy of one family memoir written by Joy Lowenstein, documenting the Lowenstein and Lipinski families.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Joy Lowenstein.
Administrative History
Joy Lowenstein (nee Lipinski) was born in June 1930 to Rose Davis and Teddy (Edward) Lipinski of Johannesburg, South Africa. Joy married Jules (Julius) Lowenstein on October 8th, 1950 at the Yeoville Shul in Johannesburg, The Lowensteins had three children who were all born in SA: David (b. 1952), Larry (b. 1955) and Kim (b. 1960). The Lowensteins were upset with South Africa’s apartheid politics and wanted to leave when David and Larry had finished their university studies.
David finished his studies at the University of Witwatersrand, but did not wish to serve in the SA army, which was mandatory for all young men. David left SA for Toronto in 1977. Kim, Joy and Jules emigrated from SA to Canada in 1977 and settled in North York. Larry worked abroad in the United States as an American Field Scholar; returned to SA to study at the University of Witwatersrand; pursued studies in law at Oxford; and then joined the family in Toronto in 1979. In Toronto, Joy and Jules opened a gift shop on Eglinton Avenue called Present Place which they owned until their retirement in 2004.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-5-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
6 cm of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 9 cm
Date
1947-1991
Scope and Content
Accession primarily consists of records related to the immigration of Victor and Bayla Lejzerson from a DP camp in US-controlled West Germany. This includes a large block of correspondence between Victor and his cousins in Toronto, Deborah (Lejzersohn) and David Breslove who helped facilitate their immigration and work placement on a farm in Stouffville and in the garment trade. Also included are materials related to Max and Ethel Siegerman's community involvement including a Toronto Joint Board Cloakmakers Union Golden Jubilee book (1961), a Shaarei Shomayim graduation program (1958), two Adath Sholom Synagogue anniversary books (1986, 1991) and a photograph of Norman and Hinda (Richards) Tobias.
Administrative History
Celia Denov is the dauther of Max (1898-1995) and Ethel (Breslove) Siegerman (1891-1966). Max was a union leader and one of the founders of the Minsker Farband. The Minsker Farband was originally located on Cecil Street until it became the Adath Sholom Synagogue and moved north to Sheppard Ave, eventually merging with Beth Tikvah. Ethel's brother was David Breslove, a teacher, author and founder of the Toronto Jewish Historical Society. He was married to Deborah Lejzersohn and had one son. Hinda Richards was a member of the Breslove family and married her music teacher, Norman Tobias. Both were killed in a car accident in 1973. Victor and Bayla Lejerson were married in the DP camp. Both were successful in immigrating to Canada with the help of David and Deborah Breslove.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Refugees
Name Access
Breslove, David
Breslove, Deborah
Siegerman, Max, 1898-1995
Siegerman, Ethel, 1891-1966
Lejerson, Victor
Lejerson, Bayla
Source
Archival Accessions
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