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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario, seated on a stoop in front of his fur post in Biscotasing. There are several children standing nearby and his sign is partially visible.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1945]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve's fur store in Sudbury, Ontario. The image depicts a group of men standing on the sidewalk looking at two bear cubs on rope leashes in front of the store.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Bear cubs
Fur trade
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario seated on a cart with three bags of fur, at Bisco station in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1282
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1282
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1927]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Name Access
Alter Furs
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Yonge Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
20 photographs : b&w
Date
1919-1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Jack Leve in Biscotasing and Sudbury, a Young Judaea convention for Northern Ontario in Sudbury, ca. 1955-56, a Purim play, and the Jewish Community Centre in Sudbury, ca. 1949-50.
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3361
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3361
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 11 x 14 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of members of the Sudbury Board of Trade. They are gathered in front of a large house and are holding a sign which reads: Sudbury Board of Trade. Our Slogan "We're Out After Business". Hascal Moses is pictured standing in the second row on the far right.
Subjects
Boards of trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3371
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3371
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[191-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 11 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sudbury's flatiron building was built by Hascal Moses. The design was inspired by the Flatiron building in New York City.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the Sudbury Hotel in the flatiron building.
Subjects
Architecture
Hotels
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3372
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3372
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[194-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 11 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sudbury's flatiron building was built by Hascal Moses. The design was inspired by the Flatiron building in New York City.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the Sudbury Hotel, located in the flatiron building.
Subjects
Architecture
Hotels
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2923
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2923
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1924 or 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a child standing in the doorway of Max Grossman's Furrier Shop. Visible in the right-side window is a broadside for the Standard Theatre.
Name Access
Max Grossman Furrier Shop
Subjects
Fur trade
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Bathurst Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2019-1-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-1-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 9 cm of textual records
Date
1939-1995
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting members of Ellen Kurtz-Cohen's family. Included are business records from her grandfather Anshel Tepperman's fur store, Tepperman Fur Co.; records documenting the involvement of Sam Kurtz, her other grandfather, with Jones Avenue Cemetery and Steeles Memorial Chapel; a memoriam written by Rabbi Erwin Schild in honour of Sam Kurtz; and a retirement speech given by Ellen's mother, Ruth Kurtz. The last document contains Ruth's handwritten corrections.
Administrative History
The Tepperman family came to Canada from Poland: Anshel Tepperman was born in Ozarov in 1903; Fanny Tepperman was born in Ivaniska. Anshel was the first to arrive in Canada, arriving in Halifax, Nova Scotia on April 10, 1921. The two occupied at least two addresses once in Toronto: 62 Lipincott Street and 96 Roberta Drive. Fanny arrived almost three years later, arriving in Halifax on March 16, 1924. The couple had three children: Ruth (1928-2016), Maurice (1929-1984), and Cecile (b. 1936). Anshel died on July 17, 1974; Fanny died on September 27, 1994.
Subjects
Families
Fur trade
Name Access
Kurtz, Ruth
Kurtz, Sam
Schild, Erwin
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Custodial History
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is holding a long stick with several dozen fish hanging from it.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Laplanders in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve and another man is holding snowshoes and one man is on cross-country skis.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Sami (European people)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left) standing next to an unidentified man, probably in Biscotasing, which is near Sudbury. The men are standing amongst some rocks and the man on the left is holding a small hand pick. Leve is looking at a piece of stone with a magnifying glass.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right), of Sudbury, Ontario, seated in the wilderness under a canvas lean-to, with an Indigenous family.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve of Sudbury, Ontario, holding two baby beavers.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Beavers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3373
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3373
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[191-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 11 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sudbury's flatiron building was built by Hascal Moses. The design was inspired by the Flatiron building in New York City.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the Flatiron building in Sudbury, Ontario. There are several people standing on the sidewalk in front of it.
Subjects
Architecture
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4812
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4812
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1915]
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia
Admin History/Bio
Lou Roseman was a relative of Ray Havelock, Toronto.
Name Access
Roseman, Lou
Subjects
Fathers and sons
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1985-10-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (seated) of Sudbury, Ontario, with a friend in the northern wilderness. The pair are monitoring a fur trapline. The friend is pictured preparing some hot food.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Trapping
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Algonquin women, nicknamed "the Buckshots", in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. They are standing outside in the snow.
Name Access
Buckshots
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario with a team of sled dogs, near Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Seve, Jack
Subjects
Sled dogs
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left), of Sudbury, Ontario and an Indigenous man in a canoe. They are likely on Lake Biscotasi, near Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1890
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1890
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[192-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print of Max Noble standing in front of Noble's Clothing Store on 150 Market Street in Brantford, Ontario.
Name Access
Noble, Max
Subjects
Clothing trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-1-14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1500
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1500
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1908]
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w and sepia (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 9 x 14 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original and copy photograph and copy negative of Louis Minden inside his clothing store in Webbwood, Ontario near Espanola.
Name Access
Minden, Louis
Subjects
Clothing trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Webbwood (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1501
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1501
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1908]
Physical Description
1 photograph : sepia ; 9 x 14 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a print of Louis Minden standing in front of his clothing store in Webbwood, Ontario near Espanola.
Name Access
Minden, Louis
Subjects
Clothing trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Webbwood (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right) of Sudbury, Ontario standing with an Indigenous man from Shawinigan, Ontario. They are both holding a baby beaver in their hands.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two unidentified men in front of a wooden house, in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Single story houses
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve with three Indigenous men and a dog team in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is pictured second from the left.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left) of Sudbury, Ontario, with an Indigenous man near Pogamasing Lake, Ontario. Pictured with the men is a dog harnessed to a sled.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pogamasing Lake (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario with three friends. They are standing next to a float plane that is docked by the shore of Lake Biscotasi, in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Floatplanes
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 11; File 1; Item 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
11
File
1
Item
16
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1928]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
The business pictured is Merchants Clothing Co., 131 Queen St. West. Prices for the artciles of clothing are clearly visble on the signs behind the figure of Jack. A variety of hats are on display in the front window.
Name Access
Kamarner, Jack
Merchants Clothing Co.
Subjects
Storefronts
Physical Condition
There is some blurring of the image and discoloration on this print, especially towards the lower right corner.
Places
Queen Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1634
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1634
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1950]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph and copy negative of the opening of the Bond Clothes Shop in Lindsay, Ontario. The photograph depicts a crowd gathered at the front entrance. The store slogan is written on the front sign: Gentlemen prefer Bond's.
Name Access
Bond Clothes Shop (Lindsay, Ont.)
Subjects
Clothing trade
Crowds
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Lindsay (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 897
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
897
Material Format
graphic material
Responsibility
Duke Studios
Date
1976
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original print of the Rosenstein building, owned by Mrs. Rosenstein of Sturgeon Falls, and Seymour's men's boys' and ladies' wear store in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Seymour's was owned by Seymour Sukerman and was established in the early 1930s.
Name Access
Sukerman, Seymour
Subjects
Clothing trade
Streets
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Community correspondence series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28-1; Series 6; File 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Community correspondence series
Level
File
Fonds
28-1
Series
6
File
27
Material Format
textual record
Date
1965-1967
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file consists of correspondence concerning fundraising activities, community mailing lists, community lectures and events, and a list of donations to the United Israel Appeal Emergency Fund.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Civil and Human Rights Legislation sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-1
File
70
Material Format
textual record
Date
1962
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of newspaper clippings regarding the Sudbury Jewish community
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2004-5-66
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-66
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Date
1938
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an original and a copy photograph of a salesman in a sparcely furnished fur shop in an unknown location.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Small Ontario Jewish Communities sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-8
File
14
Material Format
textual record
Date
1965
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence and newspaper clippings from Sudbury concerning Jewish related issues.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Small Ontario Jewish Communities sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-8
File
21
Material Format
textual record
Date
1966
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence concerning Jewish related issues in Sudbury.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Research Records sub-series
Small Ontario Jewish Communities sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-4-8
File
65
Material Format
textual record
Date
1970
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence and newspaper clippings regarding Jewish related issues in Sudbury
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1325
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1325
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1915]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
The building for the Sky's store was erected in 1912. The photograph was taken before the remodeling of the building, which was completed by 1918.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of the exterior of the Sky family's store in South Porcupine, Ontario.
Name Access
Sky family
Subjects
Architecture
Family-owned business enterprises
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
South Porcupine (Timmins, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-6-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 12; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
12
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[194-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
Atlantic Fur Company Ltd. was established in Toronto in the 1940s and is one of the largest Canadian fur companies
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph taken inside the Atlantic Fur Company showing several employees at their workstations and the interior of the workroom
Notes
Formerly cited as photo #24.
Name Access
Atlantic Fur Company Limited
Fur Workers' Union
Subjects
Clothing workers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 12; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
12
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1942]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
National Fur Company was based in Toronto and employed over 200 people at the time this photograph was taken
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph taken inside the National Fur Company of several employees at their workstations
Notes
Formerly cited as photo #25
Name Access
National Fur Company
Fur Workers' Union
Subjects
Clothing workers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 12; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Fur Workers' Union fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
12
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[between 1935 and 1940]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
Kelman Furs was located at 110 Spadina Avenue in the Tower building.
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of an interior workroom at the Kelman Furs Company on Spadina Avenue. The photograph shows employees posing at their various work stations
Notes
Formerly cited as photo #26.
Name Access
Fur Workers' Union
Kelman, S
Kelman Furs
Subjects
Clothing workers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Spadina Avenue (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Blakeman, J. Fur
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Blakeman, J. Fur
Page Number
746
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 23; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
File
Fonds
23
File
1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1934-[198-]
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
3 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 48 cm and 21 x 26 cm
Admin History/Bio
There was a major dispute within the International Fur Workers' Union in 1938, which is documented in the records of Harry Simon. It was due to the division between the Communist and anti-Communist elements of the union and resulted in the formation of a new fur workers' union affiliated with the American Federation of Labor (AFL).
Scope and Content
File consists of textual and graphic records related to Harry Simon's work as an organizer and representative of the International Fur Workers' Union and an officer of the break-away Fur Workers' Union (AFL.). This includes correspondence, rally posters and flyers, anniversary books, a bulletin, and photographs. Of particular interest are the records detailing a heated dispute between the International Fur Workers' Union, its Toronto Joint Board leadership and many of its members. An oversized newsprint poster referring to Max Federman's dispute is included.
Subjects
Labor unions
Physical Condition
One photograph requires conservation work.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Publicity photographs of people and events series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28; Series 6; File 346
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Publicity photographs of people and events series
Level
File
Fonds
28
Series
6
File
346
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[195-?]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
The file consists of photographs taken during a seminar on Israel that took place in sudbury.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-2-4
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
1 photograph : col.
2 documents : col. (jpg)
Date
[1910?]-2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of six photographs of the Greenspoon family of Sudbury, Ontario. There are also two scanned documents: Moe Greenspoon's 1918 birth certificate and his statement of service in the Canadian Armed Forces, issued in 1990.
Photographs include the following:
01. Benjamin and Fanny Greenspoon ca. 1910. (photograph was a reprint of a scanned original)
02. Paul Allan Greenspoon with grandfather Benjamin and his second wife at bar mitzvah, ca. 1966.
03. Greenspoon family gathering ca. 1942. L to R (back): Nathan, Doris, Moses (Moe), Max, Sydney, Irving, Bill, Ruth, Louis. L to R (front): Dave, wife Ann, Ben, Fanny, Harry, wife Millie.
04. Greenspoons at the Nahala dedication plaque in Israel, Oct. 1972. L to R: Rose (married to Max), daughter Elaine, Max, son Ira, Ira's wife Merle, and Ben in front.
05. Zady's Boyz - basketball team of all the grandsons with Moe, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
Communities
Families
Name Access
Greenspoon, Moe
Places
Sudbury, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-8-18
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
47 photographs : b&w and col. (jpg)
2 textual records (pdf)
Date
1919-2000, predominant 1940s
Scope and Content
Accession consists of forty-seven digital copies of family photographs and photocopied documents belonging to the Wichefsky (later Witchel) family of Sudbury, Ontario. The photographs are images of family members, the family's cabin near town, and their friends. There is also a Yiddish language letter from the yeshiva in Poland attesting to David Wichefsky's graduation and a family tree.
Administrative History
Doris Witchel Laskin is the daughter of Jacob Witchel and granddaughter of Rabbi David Wichefsky. David Wichefsky was Sudbury's first rabbi and Hebrew teacher. He arrived in 1894 and together with his wife Esther raised seven children. The family name was later changed to Witchel. David's son Jacob, the second eldest, was born before the family immigrated. Jacob married Bella Cohen in Montreal in 1918. They had six children: Doris, Jess, Shirley, David, Thora, and William (Bill). The Witchels are related to the Moses and Magder families of Sudbury.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Yiddish
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3357
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3357
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1906]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jake Witchel of Sudbury, Ontario.
Notes
Original photograph by Henderson, Sudbury.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3359
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3359
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[191-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy portrait and corresponding negative of Hascal Moses of Sudbury, Ontario.
Notes
Original photograph by Carriere & ? or Montreal, Quebec.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3364
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3364
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1903]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 11 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Annie (née Wichefsky) Moses of Sudbury, Ontario.
Notes
Also spelled as Witchefsky.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-10-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
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