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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left), of Sudbury, Ontario and an Indigenous man in a canoe. They are likely on Lake Biscotasi, near Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
20 photographs : b&w
Date
1919-1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Jack Leve in Biscotasing and Sudbury, a Young Judaea convention for Northern Ontario in Sudbury, ca. 1955-56, a Purim play, and the Jewish Community Centre in Sudbury, ca. 1949-50.
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right) of Sudbury, Ontario standing with an Indigenous man from Shawinigan, Ontario. They are both holding a baby beaver in their hands.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two unidentified men in front of a wooden house, in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Single story houses
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 6; File 1; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
6
File
1
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material
Date
May 1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (negative) ; 7 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
This is item consists of a portrait of an unidentified man wearing a suit and glasses.
Notes
This items has no proofs.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left) of Sudbury, Ontario, with an Indigenous man near Pogamasing Lake, Ontario. Pictured with the men is a dog harnessed to a sled.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pogamasing Lake (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 6; File 1; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
6
File
1
Item
5
Material Format
graphic material
Date
May 1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (negative) ; 7 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
This is item consists of a portrait of an unidentified Caucasian man wearing a suit while seated next to an unidentified African-American woman in a dress, who is smoking a cigarette and looking at the unidentified man.
Notes
This items has no proofs.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1719
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1719
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[189-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 25 x 18 cm (oval)
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of an unidentified Polish man.
Notes
Photo #1720 is probably his wife.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1979-4-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Custodial History
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is holding a long stick with several dozen fish hanging from it.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Laplanders in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve and another man is holding snowshoes and one man is on cross-country skis.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Sami (European people)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right), of Sudbury, Ontario, seated in the wilderness under a canvas lean-to, with an Indigenous family.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve of Sudbury, Ontario, holding two baby beavers.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Beavers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 4; Item 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
4
Item
28
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1984]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
This item consists of a photograph of Bill Stern, standing with an unidentified man.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2004-5-96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 4; Item 24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
4
Item
24
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[198-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 7 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of Bill Stern standing with an unidentified man.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2004-5-96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 10; Item 24
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
10
Item
24
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[196-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Notes
Photographer unknown.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2005-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (seated) of Sudbury, Ontario, with a friend in the northern wilderness. The pair are monitoring a fur trapline. The friend is pictured preparing some hot food.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Trapping
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Algonquin women, nicknamed "the Buckshots", in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. They are standing outside in the snow.
Name Access
Buckshots
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario with a team of sled dogs, near Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Seve, Jack
Subjects
Sled dogs
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario seated on a cart with three bags of fur, at Bisco station in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Family photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 1; Item 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Family photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
1
Item
30
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1940]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 35 mm
Scope and Content
This item is a negative of Bill's father Moishe Stern with an unidentified child and man. They are all wearing bathing suits and appear to be at a resort or cottage.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2006-2-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 6; File 1; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Paul Robeson and Companions file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
6
File
1
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
May 1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (negative) ; 7 x 6 cm
Admin History/Bio
Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson was born April 9, 1898 in Princeton, New Jersey. He was an internationally renowned American bass-baritone concert singer, actor of film and stage, All-American and professional athlete, writer, multi-lingual orator, scholar and lawyer who was also noted for his wide-ranging social justice activism. Robeson was a trade unionist, peace activist, Phi Beta Kappa Society laureate, and a recipient of the Spingarn Medal and Stalin Peace Prize. Robeson achieved worldwide fame during his life for his artistic accomplishments, and his outspoken, radical beliefs which largely clashed with the Jim Crow climate of the pre-civil rights United States. He became a prime target of the right during the McCarthyist era.
Robeson was the first major concert star to popularize the performance of Negro spirituals and was the first black actor of the 20th century to portray Shakespeare's Othello on Broadway. He originated the role of Joe in Show Boat in 1928 and appeared in 11 films.
At the height of his fame, Paul Robeson chose to become a primarily political artist, speaking out against fascism and racism in the US and abroad as the United States government and many Western European powers failed after World War II to end racial segregation and guarantee civil rights for people of colour. His passport was revoked from 1950 to 1958 under the McCarran Act and he was under surveillance by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Central Intelligence Agency and by the British MI5 for well over three decades until his death.
In 1959, after his passport was reinstated, Robeson was asked to reprise his role in Othello on the stage in Stratford-Upon-Avon in the United Kingdom. The production was directed by Tony Richardson and despite some criticism, Robeson performance was praised unanimously. However, this production proved to be Robeson's last appearance on the stage. During this time, he also attended speaking engagements and performed concerts throughout Europe and the USSR.
Despite persecution and limited activity resulting from ailing health in his later years, Paul Robeson remained, throughout his life, committed to socialism and anti-colonialism as a means to world peace and was unapologetic about his political views. He died in 1976 in Philadelphia, PA at the age of 77.
Scope and Content
This is item consists of a group portrait of Paul Robeson seated with a unidentified woman and man.
Notes
This items has no proofs.
Subjects
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Related Material
See item 4 of this series for another photograph of the unidentified woman and man.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
World Festival of Youth and Students file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 6; File 2; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
World Festival of Youth and Students file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
6
File
2
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Jul. 1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (negative) ; 13 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
This item consists of a view of an unidientifed man showing shometihng to three unidentified children, facing away fro mthe camera, with an archway and a series of flagpoles in the background.
Notes
This item has no proofs. This item shares a negative with F80_s6-2_f2_i3.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 7 cm on matte 9 x 11 cm
Admin History/Bio
A. Hershop may have been a cousin of Ida's, since she had a cousin named Max Wershop who lived in New York State.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait photograph of the nephew of Ida Siegel and another unidentified man. The handwriting on the verso of the photo reads: From your affectionate nephew [A. Wershop?].
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Julius P. Katz fonds
Photographs series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 55; Series 8; File 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Julius P. Katz fonds
Photographs series
Level
File
Fonds
55
Series
8
File
10
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[between 1940 and 1959]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 16 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
This file consists of a photo of J. P. Katz with an unidentified man.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 61; Series 2-2; File 50; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Jewish Community Centre Archives Committee series
Photograph collection sub-series
Level
Item
Fonds
61
Series
2-2
File
50
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1973
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph taken at the Hanukkah party at the Bloor JCC. Pictured in the photograph are an unidentified man and woman seated at a table.
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario, seated on a stoop in front of his fur post in Biscotasing. There are several children standing nearby and his sign is partially visible.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1945]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve's fur store in the Flatiron building in Sudbury, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Architecture
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 11; File 1; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
11
File
1
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12 x 7 cm
Scope and Content
The photograph is of an [unknown?] female, possibly a relative, and Jack Kamarner in Toronto.
Accession Number
1986-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve with three Indigenous men and a dog team in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is pictured second from the left.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario with three friends. They are standing next to a float plane that is docked by the shore of Lake Biscotasi, in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Floatplanes
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3550
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3550
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1926?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 6 x 8 cm
Scope and Content
Myer Bochner (1878-1968?) immigrated from Austria in 1900. He and his wife Mollie (or Malka?) (b. 1881) lived at 90 Gordon Street in Guelph. They had five children: Thomas (b. 1900); Rosie (1904-1978); Henery (b. 1906); Minnie (or Mollie?) (b. 1908), and Bella (b.1910).
Name Access
Bochner, Meyer
Bochner, Malka
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-4-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1945]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve's fur store in Sudbury, Ontario. The image depicts a group of men standing on the sidewalk looking at two bear cubs on rope leashes in front of the store.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Bear cubs
Fur trade
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 827
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
827
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1948]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print of Sam Wertman with an unidentified man of Kirkland Lake, Ontario. The photograph may have been taken at a tribute dinner at the Adath Israel Synagogue, in honour of Sam Davis.
Notes
Photo by Duke Studio.
Acquired in 1976.
Name Access
Adath Israel Synagogue (Kirkland Lake, Ont.)
Davis, Sam
Wertman, Sam
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 3; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
3
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1962
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Name Access
Gilbert, Al, 1922-
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 33; Series 4; Item 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Toronto Jewish community photographs series
Level
Item
Fonds
33
Series
4
Item
21
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1976
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 6 x 6 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a large group of men, holding a banner with Manning A.C. 1923-1976, printed on it.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2004-5-96
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2011-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-5
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 videocassette (ca. 23 min.) : col., sd. ; VHS
Date
1996
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one VHS tape of a documentary entitled "A Man of Conscience", which details the life of Morris Saxe. The film was directed by Cayle Chernin and produced by Cayle Chernin and David Fleishman, the grandson of Saxe.
Custodial History
This videocassette was collected by Stephen Speisman and found with other unaccessioned videos at the OJA. The donor was contacted and agreed to formally donate the video to us.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 117; Item 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
117
Item
25
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[192-?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tiff) ; 48 MB
Scope and Content
This item is a scanned photograph of an unknown man.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Digitization of the original photograph was done by the OJA Archivist. A master tiff file and a jpg access copy were made.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1668
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1668
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1928
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 21 x 26 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Mr. Danilak and an unidentified man, standing in the garden at the Canadian Jewish Farm School in Georgetown, Ontario.
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Farm School
Danilak, Mr.
Subjects
Farms
Orphans
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Georgetown (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-12-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 11; File 1; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Family photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
11
File
1
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1927]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 7 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
This is a family snapshot, taken outdoors in bright sunlight. Residential buildings and tree foliage can be seen in the background. Pictured are, left to right: Florence Roth (née Kamarner), Harry Graner, [unknown?], Jack Kamarner, [unknown?], and the shoulder of another unknown person (cut off by frame).
Notes
Print is somewhat faded.
Accession Number
1986-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28-1; Series 7; File 175
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
28-1
Series
7
File
175
Material Format
textual record
Date
1971-1972
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file consists of correspondence and promotional material concerning the production of the play "The Man Behind the Legend" by Yaacov Orland. This play was produced by the Jewish Welfare Board Lecture Bureau in New York and performed in Toronto on January 9, 1972.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28; Series 5; File 97
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
28
Series
5
File
97
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1971
Physical Description
16 photographs : b&w ; 10 x 15 cm
Scope and Content
The file consists of photographs of the character Theodor Herzl from a performance of the play The Man Behind the Legend.
Name Access
Herzl, Theodor, 1860-1904
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
B'nai B'rith Sportsmen Lodge dinners series
Unidentified 1960s dinner file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 2; File 3; Item 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
B'nai B'rith Sportsmen Lodge dinners series
Unidentified 1960s dinner file
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
2
File
3
Item
20
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[196-]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Name Access
Gilbert, Al, 1922-
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Publications, Speeches, Press Releases and Reports sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-2
File
82
Material Format
textual record
Date
23 Mar. 1972
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of a memo regarding the performance of the play "Man in the Glass Booth" in Toronto.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Celebrations and events series
Passover banquet for volunteers file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 105; Series 5; File 8; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Folks Farein fonds
Celebrations and events series
Passover banquet for volunteers file
Level
Item
Fonds
105
Series
5
File
8
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[196-]
Physical Description
1 slide : col. ; 35 mm
Scope and Content
Item is a photo of an unidentified volunteer receiving a corsage from an unidentified man while another woman looks on. David Green is pictured on the far right.
Subjects
Passover
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Cecil Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1990-4-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-4-7
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
10 photographs : b&w (5 negatives) ; 20 x 25 cm and smaller
Date
1926-1950
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 5 copy photographs with negatives of Jack Jacobson's Jewish school, a Hashomir Hatzair concert in 1927, Histadruth June 1950, a building likely located at 24 Cecil St., and Avrum Yitzchak Pishofsky (one of the founders of D'Arcy Talmud Torah) ca. 1930.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-11-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
84 photographs : b&w ; 19 x 25 cm or smaller
1 collage (9 photos)
Date
[ca.1890]-[ca.1935]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs which include portraits and group photos taken in Vilna, Poland, Montreal, Quebec, and New York. Many are photo postcards. Identified individuals include Miriam and Isadore Zelker, Benjamin and Dora Zelker and Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. In addition there is a United States Certificate of Citizenship issued to Isadore Zelker by the Supreme Court in Bronx, New York (1930), a Polish passport belonging to Mary Dreazen of Vilno (1921), and her United States States Certificate of Naturalization issued in New York in 1927. Lastly there is an undated Western Union Telegram congratulating Mr. and Mrs. Dreazen of New York on their marriage.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1994-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1994-10-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
6 photographs : b&w (3 negatives) ; 13 x 18 cm and 13 x 10 cm
Date
1943-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of copy photographs documenting Lt. Jack Troster's second world war military service as a machine gunner with the Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa. Included is an image of a group of servicemen in Nymegen, Holland in January 1945, an image of Jack in his uniform (July 1943), and an image of Jack and another servicemen holding up a picture of Hitler possibly in Germany (1945?).
Identified in the photographs are: Jack Troster, Capt. Butler, Lt. W. Sharp, Major MacPherson, Lt. R. Ashman, Lt. Col. R. Ross, Capt. J. Woodward, and Pipe Major Scott.
Subjects
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Material Format
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
2 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an interview and corresponding transcript, with Jack Shindman, past-president of JIAS, on immigration and his family.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Shindman, Jack
Drutz, Danny
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Rovno, Ukraine
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-117
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-117
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
6 photographs : b&w ; 12 x 8 cm and 7 x 12 cm
Date
1932-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material pertaining to the life of Jack Goldhar. Included are his Polish passport issued to Jankiel Goldhar in 1932 for his immigration to Canada, and material documenting his career in the Canadian army during the Second world War such as letters in English and Yiddish written to his family from France in 1944, an original telegram sent to his mother advising her that he was wounded in action, and a discharge certificate from the army. The photographs were taken on Euclid Avenue in Toronto and on the army base at Camp Shilo, Manitoba.
Administrative History
Jack Goldhar passed away in 1997.
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4514
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4514
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[196-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 28 x 36 cm on matte 51 x 40 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original portrait of Jack Shindman, former president of the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association, as well as Jewish Immigrant Aid Services.
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-11-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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