Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
7 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-2; File 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-2
File
10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
This file contains one report created for the Y.M.H.A.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
National Administrative Council and Executive Board series
National Treasurer sub-series
Auditor's reports sub-sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
28
Series
1-3-1
File
17
Material Format
textual record
Date
1946
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file consists of the Auditor's Report and financial statements consisting of the balance sheet, statements of income and expenditure and sundry schedules created by Richter, Usher & Co., Chartered Accountants.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Address
322 Spadina Avenue
Time Period
1946-1991
Scope Note
Opened in 1946 when the neighbourhood was still teaming with Jews working and living in the neighbourhood, this deli was one of the last to close in the area, in 1946. The Switzer family lived at 35 Nassau Street.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
Camperdown
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
Address
Camperdown
Time Period
1930-ca. 1946
Scope Note
Established in 1930, Camp Camperdown was founded in Orillia by the National Council of Jewish Women as an extension to their long-running Jewish Girls’ Club that provided athletic, cultural and vocational programs to working and school age girls in the city. At Camp Camperdown, girls were provided with even greater opportunities to discover and develop their talents and capabilities. By the late 1930s, the camp moved to the Collingwood area and it closed in the mid-1940s.
History
The guiding principle to involve campers in the decision-making process at Camp Camperdown proved highly effective. In 1946, an administrative report described, “The children keep very busy. But the things they do are the things they WANT to do, and activities that they plan, they plan together with their counselors.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Address
9 Brunswick Avenue
Source
Landmarks

The Toronto Hebrew Religious School was established in 1907 to provide children with a Jewish education based on non-denominational, Zionist, and traditional Torah values. The school’s curriculum focused on the importance of the Jewish community and people (klal yisrael), as well as the responsibilities and privileges that being a Canadian citizen entailed. Being a staunchly Zionistic institution, all lessons were taught in Hebrew (ivrit bi ivrit). Originally situated on Simcoe Street, the school moved to its Brunswick Avenue location in 1925, and was known from then on as the Toronto Hebrew Free School and more informally as the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. The building was designed by Jewish architect, Benjamin Brown.
Address
9 Brunswick Avenue
Time Period
1925-1946
Scope Note
The Toronto Hebrew Religious School was established in 1907 to provide children with a Jewish education based on non-denominational, Zionist, and traditional Torah values. The school’s curriculum focused on the importance of the Jewish community and people (klal yisrael), as well as the responsibilities and privileges that being a Canadian citizen entailed. Being a staunchly Zionistic institution, all lessons were taught in Hebrew (ivrit bi ivrit). Originally situated on Simcoe Street, the school moved to its Brunswick Avenue location in 1925, and was known from then on as the Toronto Hebrew Free School and more informally as the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah. The building was designed by Jewish architect, Benjamin Brown.
History
In 1946 the school became known officially as the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto. Having started initially as an afternoon and weekend school, in the 1940s the school began offering a full day program with its’ first grade 8 day school class graduating in 1951. From the Brunswick location, Associated branched out, and opened up branches further north, eventually establishing campuses on Finch Ave. and Neptune, where the schools are currently located.
Category
Education
Source
Landmarks
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Source
Landmarks

Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
Address
52 East Fox Lake Rd.
Time Period
1933-present
Scope Note
Established in 1933, Camp Winnebagoe was the first Jewish co-educational camp in Canada, owned and operated by Joe and Sadie Danson. First located on the Rouge River, just east of Toronto, the camp moved to a number of different lakeside locations in the Huntsville area, during its long history. In 1971, Camp Winnebagoe purchased Camp Ogama on Fox Lake and it has been there since, operated by the Lustig family. The camp’s programming includes secular and Jewish traditions including themed days, events honouring individual campers’ outstanding contributions and Friday Night Services.
History
In 1946, David Lieberman founded Camp Ogama, a private a co-educational overnight camp for children aged 6-16, on Fox Lake near Huntsville. It was touted to be “Canada’s most progressive camp for young Jewish boys and girls.” The socially conscience programming offered at Camp Ogama had a profound impact on counselors and campers alike producing highly influential alumni. Former camper journalist Earl Pomerantz reflects, “Camp inoculated us with a passion for justice. And it wasn’t write a check and see you later; this was money where your mouth is.”
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Dr. A.I. Willinsky fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 81; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. A.I. Willinsky fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
81
Item
8
Material Format
moving images
Date
Mar. 1946
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 65 min.) : 18 fps, col., si. ; 16 mm
1 magnetic track : sound track ; 16 mm
1 digi-beta cassette (ca. 65 min.) : master, digital, col., si.
1 DVD (ca. 65 min.) : duplicate, digital, col, si.
Scope and Content
Item is a film production of Dr. and Mrs. Willinsky's trip to Lima, Peru to attend the 5th International Assembly of the International College of Surgeons. Footage of assembly delegates, landmarks and the local population are interspersed with captions added by Dr. Willinsky. Included are scenes of assembly delegates near Lima's Workman's Hospital, Sadie visiting the home of the assembly's chairman and entering the palace of Peru's president for a luncheon, sights along the streets of San Martin, cathedrals, shots taken from a moving train, and images of the Ricmac River from a nearby road.
Notes
Previously reels # 43 and 60
Places
Peru
Source
Archival Descriptions
7 records – page 1 of 1.