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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1973
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. (jpg)
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy photograph of Mimi Wise standing in front of a poster for the Shalom Israel at Yorkdale fair that she helped organize, on the occasion of Israel's 25th anniversary.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2011-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-8-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
7 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 25 cm on matte 31 x 32 cm or smaller
Date
1934, 1973
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records related to Mimi Wise's involvement in the Shalom Israel festival and exhibition at Yorkdale Shopping Centre celebrating Israel's twenty-fifth anniversary. Also included is an original photograph of the Alpha Sigma Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity at the University of Toronto from November 1934. Pictured is Syd Wise and his brother David.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Dr. Sydney Wise until they were donated to the Archives on
Name Access
Wise, Mimi, 1920-2004
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy photograph of Mimi Wise holding a spoon with a cabbage roll on it. She was cooking cabbage rolls for the Hadassah Bazaar. The photograph was taken for the Toronto Telegram. The caption that went with the photograph reads "Mrs. Sydney Wise, Hadassah member who will be cooking for the bazaar, offers this cabbage rolls recipe she uses".
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Toronto Telegram. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy photograph of Mimi Wise cooking cabbage rolls in her kitchen for the Hadassah Bazaar. The photograph was taken for the Toronto Telegram.
Subjects
Food
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Toronto Telegram. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rebecca Kamarner fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
11
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca.1900]-[196-?]
Physical Description
4.5 cm of textual records
24 photographs : b&w and sepia ; 21 x 13 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Rebecca Kamarner (née Huenstein) (1882-1975) was born in Russia and lived there until her early adulthood. She married Harry Kamarner (1877- 1962) in 1902 and immigrated to Toronto around 1904. Mrs. Chava Kamarner (1847-1929), possibly Harry’s mother, may have immigrated at a later date and lived with the family in Canada. Rebecca and Harry had three children: Bessie (b. 1903), Anne (b. 1906?), and Jack (1907?-1986). Harry and Rebecca lived on 35 Bellevue Avenue in 1925 and later resided at 72 Barton Street.
From the date of her arrival as an immigrant to Canada, Mrs. Kamarner was involved in charitable work through such organizations as The Hebrew Women’s Convalescent Home established in 1936 (of which she was the President and founder), The Hebrew Maternity Aid Society, and The Women’s Auxiliary Toronto Hebrew Free School. During the First and Second World Wars she was actively involved in social aid and the sponsorship of orphans, and she worked as a nurse during the influenza pandemic that began in 1918 and had its greatest effect on the Jewish community in Toronto in 1919 and 1920. She was one of the earliest members of the Toronto Hadassah-Wizo (Schamira Levine chapter) and was also actively involved in fundraising for the Women’s Auxiliary of The New Mount Sinai Hospital, of which she was listed as a charter member. She served on the Board of Directors of The Jewish Home for the Aged and was a preeminent name in the promotion of convalescent care and social advocacy for the disadvantaged throughout her lifetime.
Harry, Nathan "Nutta" (d. 1956), and Louis Kamarnar were men’s clothing and furnishings retailers and owned the Merchant’s Clothing Co. store on 131 Queen Street West. Harry, his son Jack, and his son-in-law Harry Granger, were also affiliated with the Judean Knights of Pythias, a fraternal order.
Bessie Kamarner married Sam Robins (b.1893) in 1922 and they lived together at 273 Queen Street East. Anne Kamarner was married to Harry Graner (d. 1986) in 1931. Jack Kamarner lived in Toronto and married Jeanne (née Rubin). They had two daughters, Ann and Nancy.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of family photographs, a scrapbook, and other textual records, both of a personal nature and those relating to the volunteer work done by Rebecca Kamarner. These records document her community social work, her affiliation with the Women’s Auxiliary, and her fundraising efforts for the Hebrew Women’s Convalescent Home, later the Mount Sinai Convalescent Home, in Toronto.
Name Access
Kamarner, Rebecca, 1882-1975
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Volunteers
Related Material
see also clipping, re. photo #2503, from accession 1978-6-4
Arrangement
The fonds has been arranged in five files: the first file is of family photographs; the second contains one passport; the third contains institutional programmes; the fourth is of personal invitations and correspondence; and, the fifth file contains Rebecca Kamarner's scrapbook and clippings from that scrapbook. These are all kept together in one box and each file is housed in a separate folder.
Creator
Kamarner, Rebecca, 1882-1975
Places
Russia
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-5-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 78
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
78
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[189-]-1997
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
176 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
2 photographs (jpg) : b&w
Admin History/Bio
Sadie Stren was born on April 19, 1915 in Detroit, Michigan. Her father and mother had come from a small town in Russia. Samuel Goldberg, her father, arrived to stay with family in Brantford, Ontario in 1910 and began working as a peddler. He moved to Detroit, Michigan in 1912 where he worked for the Ford Motor Company and later owned a confectionary store. Emma, Sadie’s mother, came from Russia to reunite with Samuel after he began living in Detroit and the couple married and started a family there.
Sadie grew up in a predominately Jewish neighbourhood in Detroit with her parents and her sister Sarah. She graduated from what is now Wayne State University and worked as a social studies teacher in Detroit for approximately 10 years, until she married at age 31. Sadie first met her husband, Maurice "Maurie" Strenkovsky (1910-1995), while visiting relatives in Brantford. By the time the two had met, Maurie was going by the last name Stren, although it is not certain when he began to do so. He served in the Second World War and corresponded with Sadie during their courtship. The two married in 1947, five years after meeting. The couple initially lived in Detroit, where their son David was born on August 28, 1948, but soon moved to Brantford, where Sadie gave birth to a daughter, Patti, on August 8, 1949. Maurie became a manufacturer of surgical dressing and continued in this profession until his retirement.
When Sadie first moved to Brantford, she joined several Jewish women’s organizations, including Hadassah. She has continued to be actively involved in both Jewish and non-Jewish community organizations since that time. She ran and taught the Beth David Sunday school in Brantford for many years, and in 1976, was honoured for her work as Sunday school supervisor by the Beth David Sisterhood. During her time in Brantford, Sadie served on the board of directors for eight different organizations, and was the president of four. She was a member of the board of directors for the Family Service Bureau and was elected president in 1966. She is also a past president of the University Women’s Club and a former board member of the YM-YWCA. Her husband was quite active in the community as well. Maurie Stren’s commitments included serving as President of B’nai B’rith Brantford from 1965-1966 and as District Governor of the Lions Club from 1963-64, among other things.
Upon moving to Toronto, Sadie became a member of the Baycrest Women’s Auxiliary and volunteered at Mount Sinai Hospital and the Aphasia Institute.
Sadie was an amateur historian who served as the Brantford Jewish community's archivist and historian for a number of years. She had been collecting sources of Brantford Jewish history in her home since at least the 1970s in order to assemble the history of Brantford's community. Sadie was also an author who wrote about the history of the Brantford community, spoke at conferences, and was a contributor to the Canadian Jewish Historical Society Journal in 1981. She passed away on December 9, 2014. She was one hundred.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Sadie Stren in five different transfers from 1976-2006. The first accession was received as a part of the small communities project in 1976 and included only photographs. Subsequent accessions included photographs and textual documents relating to both Sadie’s family and the Brantford community. Sadie is an author and she acquired some of the materials when researching the history of the Brantford community.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material created and collected by Sadie Stren related to the Brantford Jewish community, as both a member of the community and an author researching its history. Among the records are newspaper and article clippings, correspondence, research notes, records of the Brantford Hebrew Association, miscellaneous printed and published material, Hadassah minutes, records related to Congregation Beth David and its Hebrew school and photographs.
The Brantford Hebrew Association records include 3 ledger books which span the years between 1909 to 1952, legal documents for the Association including the original letters patent incorporating the Brantford Hebrew Association in 1911.
Notes
Some of the photographs are modern copies of older photographs.
Some early accessions contained photocopies of orginal documents that were eventually donated in later transfers. These photocopies were culled.
Many photographs were described at the item level at the time they were accessioned, but there are quite a few photographs in the fonds which have not yet been described in detail.
Name Access
Stren, Sadie, 1915-2014
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Volunteers
Related Material
For additional material related to the Brantford Jewish community see also accession #1978-11-4, accession #2009-2-5, oral history #AC91, and accession #2004-5-71.
Creator
Stren, Sadie, 1915-
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-6-9
1977-5-6
1978-11-3
2005-11-10
2006-12-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Patricia Joy Alpert fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 77
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Patricia Joy Alpert fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
77
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
sound recording
Date
[ca. 1907]-2001, predominant 1990-2001
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Patricia Joy Alpert (1931-2001) was an internationally-acclaimed artist, teacher, and dynamic community leader, most notably serving as national president of Canadian Hadassah-WIZO from 1996 to 1999. Pat was born in Toronto in 1931 to parents Oscar and Gertrude Pattenick. Oscar Pattenick, the son of Benjamin Pattenick and Pauline Goldenberg, was born in 1892 in Galicia and immigrated to Canada with his brother as a young man. The brothers ran a retail clothing business that expanded to several locations around Ontario, including Toronto and Bowmanville. Oscar married Gertrude Breslin (1896-1988) in 1917. She was one of fourteen children of Hyman Breslin and Sarah Pearl Papernick and had been raised in Toronto. Together the couple raised three children: Bernard (Boon), and twin girls Patricia and Pearl.
Pat and her sister showed artistic talent from an early age. After graduating from Oakwood Collegiate Institute, Pat enrolled at the University of Miami and graduated with a BA in art history in 1956. She started her career as a designer and display artist at the Simpson department store, doing freelance artwork and volunteering at the Art Gallery of Ontario. Pat married Herbert S. Alpert in 1958 and they had two daughters, Lisa and Nancy. Pat went back to school at Toronto Teacher's College and then taught kindergarten for eleven years for the North York Board of Education. She also earned a supervisor's art certificate and taught art at the Art Gallery of Ontario, Royal Ontario Museum, North York Public Library, and Associated Hebrew Schools. Her artistic career took off in the 1970s, when her drawings were exhibited in solo and group exhibitions around North America. She typically drew human figures using ink.
Pat Alpert’s volunteer work began soon after her marriage, when she joined Toronto's Carmel chapter of Hadassah as a way to make new friends. In 1983, she became president of Toronto Hadassah-WIZO, serving until 1985. She continued with Toronto Hadassah as vice-president and corresponding secretary. Pat was deeply committed to Jewish life and to the State of Israel. Choosing Hadassah as the focus of her passion, she left her professional career in the 1990s to become a full-time volunteer. She served as chair of the Canadian Hadassah-WIZO Foundation, Vice-president of National Hadassah, national president from 1996 to 1999 and president of Toronto Jewish National Fund from 1992 to 1994. Pat also held positions for Israel Bonds, Jewish Women’s Federation, B’nai Brith League for Human Rights, the Holocaust Centre of Toronto, Baycrest Women’s Auxiliary and board of governors, and Reena Foundation. Pat Alpert died on October 4, 2001, at the age of seventy.
Custodial History
Donated by Herbert Alpert in late 2001 or early 2002. No documentation for this donation could be found when it was assigned an accession number in October 2002 during an inventory of the vault. Pat Alpert's daughter Nancy Spring was contacted in 2009 to sign a deed of gift.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains records documenting Patricia Joy Alpert's personal, professional and volunteer-related activities. The records include textual material, photographs, and a sound recording of a radio show announcing an exhibit of Alpert's work. The records of Alpert's professional career as an artist and a teacher are comprised of curriculum vitae and brief biographies, exhibit records and correspondence. Samples of Alpert's drawings are included, dating from the 1940s to the 1970s. The records relating to Alpert's community leadership include a large number of speeches, clippings, articles, correspondence, cards and letters, meeting minutes, and unique diary entries meticulously detailing Hadassah business, conversations and controversies. There are minutes from the following entities: Hadassah National Officers, Hadassah National Executive Board, World WIZO Executive and Canadian Hadassah Foundation. Other organizations represented in the records include the Jewish National Fund, Baycrest Women’s Auxiliary, Canada-Israel Cultural Foundation, and State of Israel Bonds.
The personal records in the fonds include letters written by Pat to Herbert when he was working in England during parts of 1968-1970, letters exchanged between Pat and her daughters when the girls were at camp in 1971 and 1973, and a collection of clippings spanning twenty years in which Alpert appears. As well, there is a notebook of Pat's Torah observations, thoughts and quotations. The personal series also contains records of Gertrude Pattenick's: a handwritten homemaker's guide and recipe book, ca. 1907, and several letters exchanged between Gertrude and Oscar before and during their marriage. One file contains the obituary of Gertrude and the condolences received by Pat.
There are approximately 3175 photographs (218 negs and 45 slides) in the fonds. These are of Hadassah conferences and annual conventions, meetings, social events, Hadassah projects in Israel (contact sheets) and images of Alpert's drawings. Many of the photographs were originally in four scrapbooks Alpert created: three to highlight the events of her Hadassah presidency and one she titled "Important Moments" that spans the 1980s and 1990s. The scrapbook files (in box 3) contain photographs, clippings and a number of event programs. The photographs include images of Alpert at special events and conventions, as a speaker, meeting people, socializing and travelling in Israel and to international Hadassah events around the world.
The poster in the fonds is for an event organized by the Women's Auxiliary of Baycrest Centre in 1981, the second annual Camerata concert and gala reception.
The fonds is arranged in 6 series: 1. Personal; 2. Professional; 3. Toronto Hadassah; 4. Hadassah-WIZO Canada; 5. Jewish National Fund; 5. Hadassah-WIZO of Canada Foundation; Other organizations.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes ca. 3175 photographs (218 negatives and 45 slides), 1 cassette tape and 1 poster.
Name Access
Alpert, Patricia Joy, 1931-2001
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada (Subject)
Subjects
Artists
Teachers
Volunteers
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Arrangement
The arrangement of the fonds was constructed by the archivist. The scrapbooks were taken apart and the captions for each event provided the titles for the files.
Creator
Alpert, Patricia Joy, 1931-2001
Accession Number
2002-10-65
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2004-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-9
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 12 x 16 cm and 13 x 18 cm
Date
[ca. 1915?]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of an original and copy photograph of Sydney Wise's bris, May 1, 1915, and a Wladowsky family photograph.
Administrative History
Dr. Sydney Wise was a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. He passed away in January 2013.
Descriptive Notes
An identification key is provided.
Subjects
Berit milah
Families
Volunteers
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Wladowsky, Bernard, 1870-1963
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 16
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
16
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1967
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tif)
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of Mimi Wise (second from left) meeting a visiting Baroness Alix de Rothschild (far right).
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 2-4; File 459
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
2-4
File
459
Material Format
textual record
Date
1971-1973
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4208
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4208
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1986
Physical Description
1 photograph
Notes
Photo by Graphic Artists, Toronto.
Name Access
Lipman, Roy
Big Brothers
Subjects
Volunteers
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1986-12-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Women's Auxiliary series
Programs and services sub-series
Snack bar file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 14; Series 4-6; File 38; Item 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Women's Auxiliary series
Programs and services sub-series
Snack bar file
Level
Item
Fonds
14
Series
4-6
File
38
Item
2
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1968?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Snack Bar volunteers.
Subjects
Volunteers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2020-2-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2020-2-2
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 folders (electronic)
Date
2012–2019
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material accumulated by Shlomo Gleibman during his years volunteering for Kulanu Toronto, Shir Libeynu, and Jewish LGBT programs at Miles Nadal JCC.
Included among the Kulanu Toronto records are a draft of a letter to the Canadian Jewish News responding to a a "hateful letter" that appeared in the newspaper; a Holocaust Education Week program; a list of interested candidates for Kulanu Toronto's executive committee 2013–2014; a list of some of Kulanu's past events; a list of Jewish LGBT organizations; a filled-out nomination form for the Bill Graham Award, which was established in 2008 by the Pride and Remembrance Association to recognize service to the LGBT community; and a list of inclusive synagogues in Greater Toronto.
Included among the Miles Nadal JCC records are a flyer for its Downtown Shabbat Dinner Series, a document titled "Towards a Proposal for Jewish LGBTQ Programming in Toronto," an agenda for the LGBTQ Advisory Committee meeting held on 28 March 2019, a letter to a "Friend of Kulanu" informing the latter that many of the organization's functions will be taken over the MNjcc LGBTQ+ Programming Committee, and a MNjcc LGBTQ+ initiative proposal.
Included among the Shir Libeynu records are a photograph possibly taken at Pride in 2012, the congregation's logo with Pride colours, and information about the congregation's Pride Havdalah service and other Pride programming.
Administrative History
Shlomo Gleibman was born in Lviv, Ukraine in 1974. Upon moving to Toronto, he volunteered with a number of organizations: From 2012, he served on Kulanu Toronto's executive committee in the capacity of director of education. From 2016–2019, he served on the board of Shir Libeynu, serving as the board's president from 2018–2019. As of 7 February 2020, he was a PhD candidate in York University. Shlomo has also studied at yeshivot in New York and Israel.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Related groups of records external to the unit being described: Other records relating to Kulanu Toronto can be found in the Kulanu Toronto fonds.
Subjects
Volunteers
Name Access
Gleibman, Shlomo
Kulanu Toronto
Miles Nadal Jewish Community Centre
Shir Libeynu
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 52
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
52
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Lipa Wise (1908-1994) was born in 1908. He was married to Dora and had three sons: Sidney, Arnold and Martin. Wise was an active member of the Labour Zionist Alliance and a member of Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue. He died on 27 May 1994, at the age of 86.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Lipa Wise.
Name Access
Wise, Lipa
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 28-1; Series 7; File 339
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds
Central Region sous-fonds
Subject files series
Level
File
Fonds
28-1
Series
7
File
339
Material Format
textual record
Date
1963-1964
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file consists of a questionnaire and correspondence concerning Camp Manitou-wabing.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of mainly textual material
Date
1923-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials created by Anshel Wise which document his family and travel business. It consists of genealogical information on his family, two ledgers from his business which document transactions and shipping dates, one scribbler which includes information on steamship sailings, one blank letterhead with his company's logo, and a photograph of his fiftieth wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Anshel Wise emigrated from Poland in 1910 and established his home in Toronto. He opened up a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a travel agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau.
During the course of his career, Anshel helped bring in hundreds of Jews from Europe, primarily Poland using the shipping lines. He spoke many languages and was able to assist the community by providing advice and services in this area. Later in his career after the establishment of the welfare state, he began helping residents of the St. John's Ward by providing advice, finding the required documents that they needed and helping them apply for retirement benefits.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-52
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-52
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
14 photographs : b&w (6 negatives) ; 21 x 15 cm or smaller + identification key
Date
1929-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of original and copy photographs and negatives of Syd Wise with his university basketball and vollyball teams, and in England and Germany during his military career with the U.S. Army Medical Corps.In addition there is a photograph of a group of young people at Camp Yungvelt in 1928.
Custodial History
Donated by Sydney Wise.
Administrative History
Dr. Sydney Wise was a paediatrician who volunteered at the Ontario Jewish Archives. He passed away in 2013.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1977-5-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1977-5-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Date
1938
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photo of the 10th Anniversary of Agudath Hamishpacha, Toronto.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-12-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (tif)
Date
[ca. 1925-1926]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of electronic copies of three photographs of Syd at Camp Yungvelt on Lake Wilcox. Also pictured are some of Syd's relatives and childhood friends. Identified individuals include Sydney Wise, Isadore Tepperman, David Wise, Leo Tepperman, Reuben Goldstein, Ben Lapidus (Lappin), George Trimble, Sam Stellman, Lil Stellman, Min Stellman, Lillian Wise, Rose Hoffman, Archie Gordon, Nathan Langbord, and Jack Weinzweig.
Custodial History
The original records are in the possession of Dr. Sydney Wise. He loaned the records to the Archives for copying on 2006-12-20.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Camp Yungvelt
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : sepia toned
Date
[ca. 1922]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of Syd Wise and his siblings in front of Anshel Wise's cigar store and "steamship office" at 100 Dundas Street West at the northwest corner of Terauley Street. Seen from left to right are: Syd Wise, Lil Wise, and David Wise.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Dundas Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Teraulay Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
11 photographs : b&w and sepia toned ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1920] - 1959
Scope and Content
Accesssion consists of Dr. Sydney Wise's class photographs from Orde Street School (ca. 1920) and Jarvis Collegiate Institute (1931). Also included is a photograph of the University of Toronto's Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority (ca. 1935), of which Dr. Wise's wife, Mimi Marin, was a member. There are also class photographs of Dr. Wise's children from Holy Blossom Temple's religious school (1957-1959) and a group photograph of the West Prep Orchestra (1957-1958). Finally, accession contains a photograph from the Marin family's New Year's Eve party (ca. 1927). Identified are Max Enkin (seated at the botton right) and Sonia and Joe Marin (seated and standing behind Enkin).
Custodial History
Records were donated by Sydney Wise
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-6
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
29 photographs : b&w ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[1918?]-1958
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records related to the personal and professional life of the Wise family. The records, primarily photographs, document the early life of Rose Wise née Offstein living on Cameron Street and working in Toronto’s garment industry. The family photos from Paris, Ontario share views of Paris' main street where Harry Wise owned and operated his men's and boys wear shop. Included in this series are photographs of the interior and exterior of the shop located on Grand River Street, the family apartment located above their retail store, street scenes, school athletic teams, the local Rebekah chapter and Rose and Harry’s Brantford home. In addition, there are report cards from Paris public schools (1933-37), middle school examination results (1943-45), central school graduation certificates (1936-1940), a certificate of recognition for completion of a course in Gospel of Mark (1939), pages from a high school yearbook, a stag invite (1958) and a B'nai B'rith citation award for service (1970), all belonging or awarded to Leonard Wise, eldest son of Harry and Rose Wise.
Photo captions:
01 Harry and Rose Wise gather with children Leonard, Melvin (front), Florence and Paul (right) in their living room parlour, 78 Grand River St. North, (Paris, ON), [1941?]. Photograph by Ernie Goose. 02 Harry and Rose Wise seated in living room parlour, 78 Grand River Street North, (Paris, ON), [1941?]. Photograph by Ernie Goose. 03 Rose Wise standing next to the Grand River, (Paris ON), ca. 1940s 04 Studio portrait of Rose Offstein, (Toronto, ON), [192-]. Photograph by L. Surdin, Photo Studio, 16 Cameron St., Toronto. 05 Rose Offstein, [32 Cameron St ], (Toronto, ON), [1918?]. 06 Rose Offstein holding small dog, [32 Cameron St ], (Toronto, ON), [192-]. 07 Rose Offstein (left) at work, Spadina District, (Toronto, ON), [192-]. 08 Harry and Rose at the beach, [Crystal Beach, ON], [195-]. 09 Harry and Rose in living room, (Brantford, ON], [196-]. 10 Rose and Harry Wise visiting their grandson Stephen, Wise, (Montreal, QC), [196-]. 11 Rose Wise (left) pours tea for Mrs. Mead, [Paris, ON], [196-]. 12 Rose Wise stands at front door to her home, 24 Kingsway Crescent, [Brantford, ON], 1958. 13 Portrait of Rachel “Rachellie” Offstein, (Toronto, ON), [192-?] 14 Harry and Rose wise with their boys Melvin (left) and Leonard, (Paris, ON)[193-]. 15 Portrait of Harry Wise, [Paris, ON], [192-]. 16 Harry Wise stands with his children Melvin (left), Leonard and Florence (seated in pram) in front of his clothing shop for men and boys, 73 Grand River Street North, (Paris, ON), [193-]. 17 Wise family gathering with Leonard Wise (standing), and his parents Harry (seated centre) and Rose, (Brampton, ON), Sep. 1959. 18 Melvin, Florence and Leonard Wise, (Paris, ON), [193-]. 19 Melvin (left), Leonard (right) and Florence Wise, Grand River Street North, (Paris, ON), [194-]. 20 Paris High School graduating class, Leonard Wise (back row, 4th right), Grand River Street North, (Paris, ON), 1945. 21 Paris High School hockey team, Leonard Wise (standing, 2nd left), (Paris, ON), [1945?]. Other identified on the reverse of photo, Arnold Palmer, “Turk” Robinson, John “Punk” Cochrane, and Solly Rutherford. 22 Grand River Street North, (Paris, ON), [193-]. 23 Paris High School athletic event with Leonard Wise holding bullhorn, (Paris, ON), [1945?]. 24 Leonard Wise baby portrait, (Paris, ON), 1926. Inscription on the reverse “To Aunt and Uncle Yager & family. From Leonard Wise. “ 25 Wise baby in wicker pram, (Paris, ON), [192-]. 26 Portrait of Leonard Wise, (Paris, ON), [1930]. 27 Daughters of Rebekah, a.k.a. Rebekahs, [Brampton, ON], [195-?]. Photograph by Bob. Brown studios. 28 Leonard Wise stands on the running board of his local gas station’s sweepstake prize, (Paris, ON), [193-]. 29 Interior view of Harry Wise’s newly established men’s and boy’s clothing store, (Paris, ON), [192-].
Administrative History
Born in Pietrow Poland, Harry Wise (1896?-1977) immigrated to Toronto with his parents Leon Wise and Rebecca Wise (née Greenstone) in 1911. Although apprenticed as a tailor, Harry attempted farming and then peddling to locations as far north as Madawaska, Ontario. He eventually settled in Paris, Ontario and opened a retail clothing store for men and boys. In 1925, Harry met and married Rose Offstein (1903?-1970). Rose, the daughter of Phillip Offstein (1858-1937) and Rachel Rachellie Offstein (née Cavalerchion), immigrated to Toronto with her mother and siblings in 1912 from Russia. The family resided at 32 Cameron Street and Rose worked as a seamstress and finisher in Toronto’s garment district prior to marrying Harry Wise. She raised her four children Leonard (1926-1994), Melvin, Florence and Paul, in an apartment above the family business at 73 Grand River Street. In the 1950s, Harry and Rose Wise moved to 24 Kingsway, Brantford, Ontario.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Paris (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Passenger Names
Wise, Yendzi
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wise, Yendzi
Page Number
228
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1990 sub-sub-series
Walk and Festival event photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-16
File
26
Material Format
graphic material
Date
21 May 1990
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w
Scope and Content
Negative of UJA Walk for Israel volunteers grilling hot dogs. Identified are Gerarld Halbert and Julia Koschitzky.
Notes
Title based on content of negative
Negative by Graphic Artists Photographers
Subjects
Food
Volunteers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1999-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1999-11-7
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 20 x 25 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Date
1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a group portrait of the University of Toronto Medical School class of 1939 taken at their sixtieth reunion in June 1999. Identified in the top row from the left are Dr. Harold Linton, Dr. Cam Gray, Dr Bernard Laski, and Dr. Dave Rogers. In the middle row from the left are Dr. Jack Birrell, Dr. C. McCulloch, Dr. Roger Barron, Dr. Harold Fine, and Dr. Alan Basset. In the front row from the left are Dr. J. Walmseley, Dr. Sydney Wise, Dr. Charles Sheard, Dr. McQuaid, and Dr. Phil Ryan.
Subjects
Portraits, Group
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 2; Item 36
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
2
Item
36
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Dec. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 12 x 8 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Sydney Wise (1915-2013) was born in Toronto on May 3, 1915. His parents were Anshel (b. 10 Jan 1890) and Esther (née Weissblum) Wise. Born in Poland, Anshel came to Canada in August 1910 and became a travel agent. They had three children: Lillian (Sharpe), Dr. David K. Wise and Dr. Sydney Wise. Syd attended high school at Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto, graduating in 1931. He then went on to complete his undergraduate education at the University of Toronto.
Syd met his future wife, Mimi (née Marin) in 1938. Born in Toronto in 1920, Mimi (d. 2004) was the daughter of Joseph and Sonia (née Stern) Marin. The following year, Sydney moved to the United States to begin his medical internship at the Columbus Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mimi stayed behind in Toronto and continued her studies at the University of Toronto. In 1941, she graduated with a degree in physiotherapy, although she never practiced. In 1942, Sydney and Mimi married and Mimi joined Syd in the United States. The couple had 2 children, Mark and Joel.
In 1944, Sydney was sent overseas with the United States Army as a Captain in the Medical Corps. After the war Syd and Mimi returned to Toronto where Syd opened his own practice as a pediatrician. After more than 50 years, Syd retired from his medical practice in 1997. Since then, Syd has been an active volunteer at the OJA.
During their marriage, Syd and Mimi traveled to Israel frequently, often as part of Mimi's volunteer commitments with Hadassah. On a trip to Jerusalem in 1969, Syd met and had his picture taken with Prime Minister Golda Meir.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Sydney Wise.
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-1913, (subject)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Mimi Wise fonds (Fonds 16) for further records regarding Syd Wise (including the photo of Syd with Prime Minister Golda Meir).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 2; Item 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
2
Item
35
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Dec. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 12 x 8 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Sydney Wise (1915-2013) was born in Toronto on May 3, 1915. His parents were Anshel (b. 10 Jan 1890) and Esther (née Weissblum) Wise. Born in Poland, Anshel came to Canada in August 1910 and became a travel agent. They had three children: Lillian (Sharpe), Dr. David K. Wise and Dr. Sydney Wise. Syd attended high school at Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto, graduating in 1931. He then went on to complete his undergraduate education at the University of Toronto.
Syd met his future wife, Mimi (née Marin) in 1938. Born in Toronto in 1920, Mimi (d. 2004) was the daughter of Joseph and Sonia (née Stern) Marin. The following year, Sydney moved to the United States to begin his medical internship at the Columbus Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mimi stayed behind in Toronto and continued her studies at the University of Toronto. In 1941, she graduated with a degree in physiotherapy, although she never practiced. In 1942, Sydney and Mimi married and Mimi joined Syd in the United States. The couple had 2 children, Mark and Joel.
In 1944, Sydney was sent overseas with the United States Army as a Captain in the Medical Corps. After the war Syd and Mimi returned to Toronto where Syd opened his own practice as a pediatrician. After more than 50 years, Syd retired from his medical practice in 1997. Since then, Syd has been an active volunteer at the OJA.
During their marriage, Syd and Mimi traveled to Israel frequently, often as part of Mimi's volunteer commitments with Hadassah. On a trip to Jerusalem in 1969, Syd met and had his picture taken with Prime Minister Golda Meir.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Sydney Wise.
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-1913, (subject)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Mimi Wise fonds (Fonds 16) for further records regarding Syd Wise (including the photo of Syd with Prime Minister Golda Meir).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1899
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1899
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Subjects
Volunteers
War victims
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
3
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 26 x 21 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print of the interior of Harry Wise's menswear store in Paris, Ontario. Harry is pictured standing at the counter.
Name Access
Wise, Harry
Subjects
Men's clothing
Stores, Retail
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Paris (Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 99
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
George Morrison fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
99
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1978]
Physical Description
161 slides : col. ; 35 mm
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of 161 colour slides documenting various synagogues in Toronto and the outlying region.
Notes
Creator note: There is no information on the exact provenance of this fonds. The donor was George Morrison, but it is unclear if he was also the photographer and if so, why these photographs were originally taken.
Name Access
Morrison, George
Subjects
Architecture
Synagogues
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
1980-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 39
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Rose Dunkelman fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
39
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1896-1979
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
28 photographs : b&w (11 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
2 scrapbooks
Admin History/Bio
Rose Dunkelman (1889-1949) was born Rose Miller in Philadelphia to Mr. Harry Miller and Mrs. Dora (Belkin) Miller. At the age of 13 she moved to Toronto where she received her education and where she resided with her family until her death in 1949 at the age of 59. Rose Dunkelman devoted her life to helping the less fortunate, particularly children and orphans, and to championing the cause of Zionism at home and abroad. She was internationally known and respected for her philanthropic work and for her knowledge of, and dedication to, Zionist causes. She was a leader in the Canadian Jewish community for more than 30 years.
On 19 January 1910 she married David Dunkelman (1883-1978), founder and president of Tip Top Tailors Ltd. The couple had 6 children: Joseph, Ernest, Benajamin, Theodora, Veronica (Annenberg) (Ourisman) and Zelda (Wilner).
Rose was a founding member of the Zionist Organization of Canada, vice-president of the Ontario Zionist Region, and founded and chaired the Canadian branch of Youth Aliyah in 1933. For over 25 years, Rose held various positions within the Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada, including president of the Toronto Council of Hadassah (1921), honourary president on the executive board (1938-40), joint chairman of the war effort (1941), president of the Hadassah Organization of Canada Central Chapter of Toronto (1937-8; 1945-6), and honourary national vice-president. Rose also founded the Hadassah Bazaar in 1924. There is currently a Canadian Hadassah day care centre in Neve Sharett named in her honour as well as the Rose Dunkelman Memorial Community Center in Hadassim erected in 1950 in her memory.
In 1930, prompted by the 1929 attack on Jews at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem and in Hebron, Rose and David Dunkelman founded the magazine, the Jewish Standard, as a Zionist forum for the English-speaking Jewish population of Canada. She was the periodical's first publisher and managing editor.
After the First World War, Rose worked as an officer with the Canadian Red Cross, bringing war orphans to Canada from Eastern Europe, for which she was presented with the Coronation Medal by King George VI in 1937. She was also active in the rehabilitation of First World War veterans.
During the Second World War, as chair of Ontario Youth Aliyah, Rose helped rescue children from Nazi persecution at Auschwitz, Treblinka, Buchenwald and Dachau concentration camps and helped secure their passage to and resettlement in Palestine. Dunkelman held leadership positions in many domestic and international Jewish and Zionist programs and projects -- many focused on the welfare of Jewish children -- including the Jewish National Fund, Karen Hayesod, Karen Kayemeth, Young Judaea, the Toronto Hebrew Free Schools, and the YM-YWHA. She also served on the Canadian Family Allowance Board after the Second World War.
After a lengthy illness, Rose died on 20 October 1949 in Toronto at the age of 59. She was buried at Goel Tzedec's cemetery on Dawes Rd. and was later re-interred in Israel's national cemetery at Degania on 14 January 1953, as she requested in her will.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of personal and business correspondence, family letters, newsclippings, event invitations, articles, two scrapbook albums and other textual material relating to Dunkelman's death and re-interment in Israel, her philanthropic activities with Hadassah and Youth Aliyah, and her business activities with the Jewish Standard.
One scrapbook contains a testimonial certificate presented to Rose by Toronto Hadassah on her recovery from ill health (1926), while the other was presented to her by Toronto Hadassah on the occasion of her 57th birthday in 1946. This scrapbook contains photographs of the banquet along with several pages of signatures from members of local Hadassah chapters.
The photographs include: Rose Dunkelman's re-interment in Israel (1953), a birthday banquet for Rose hosted by Hadassah (date uncertain), a portrait of Rose as a young woman (ca. 1905), David Dunkelman as a young boy in Brooklyn, NY (1896), the groundbreaking ceremony for the Mount Sinai Hospital (Toronto) extension (1966), a portrait of Benjamin Dunkelman in Israel (1953), and one photograph of Rose Dunkelman with Mrs. Sara Delano Roosevelt (1941).
Name Access
Cohen, Israel
Dunkelman, Ben, 1913-1997
Dunkelman, David
Dunkelman, Ernest
Dunkelman, Rose, 1889-1949
Dunkelman, Theodore
Dunkelman, Veronica
Dunkelman, Zelda
Dunkelman, Joseph
Family Allowance Board
Goel Tzedec Synagogue (Toronto, Ont.)
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada
Hebrew Free Schools
Jewish Federated Charities
Jewish National Fund
Jewish Standard
Karen Hayesod
Karen Kayemeth
Red Cross
Steinglass, Meyer F.
Tip Top Tailors
Weisgal, Meyer
YM-YWHA
Zionist Organization of Canada
Subjects
Businesspeople
Philanthropists
Zionists
Physical Condition
Some of the documents are very brittle.
Related Material
Ben Dunkelman fonds 2: (accession 2000-3-4)
Ben Dunkelman accession: 1978-6-6
Zionist Organization of Canada fonds 28, series 6, file 27
photo #4690
Hadassah accession: 1978-1-2, 1984-12-3, 2003-3-1, MG2 J1I
The Jewish Standard: MG9
Creator
Dunkelman, Rose, 1889-1949
Accession Number
1988-5-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
10
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1900-1971
Physical Description
12 cm of textual records
53 photographs : b&w (10 negatives) ; 23 x 30 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Dorothy Dworkin (1890-1976) was a prominent healthcare worker in the Toronto Jewish community and a founder of Mount Sinai Hospital (Toronto), whose family business, Dworkin Travel, assisted hundreds of European Jews immigrating to Canada. Dworkin was born in Latvia, one of ten children of William and Sarah Goldstick. She came to Canada in 1904, at fourteen years of age. She studied nursing in the United States by training at Mount Sinai Hospital in Cleveland. She then took her exams in midwifery, and in 1909, she received her diploma from the State Board of Ohio.
Ida Siegel and her brother Abe Lewis had set up a free Jewish dispensary in Toronto on Elizabeth Street. They hired Dorothy to take charge of it after her return. She ran the dispensary during the afternoon when it was open and made house calls the rest of the day. In 1910 she helped form the dispensary's women's auxiliary. This organization distributed pasteurized milk and offered other services. Later on, they organized an orphanage for Jewish children.
In 1911 she married Henry Dworkin, who was the founder of the Toronto Labor Lyceum. The dispensary soon closed after her departure. Henry opened a small variety store in 1917, which later became the tobacco and shipping agency business called Dworkin Travel, located at 525 Dundas Street West. Together, the Dworkins helped bring in hundreds of Jewish immigrants to Toronto. They would travel to Poland, Romania, and Latvia in order to help the family members of their clients settle in Toronto. The couple had a daughter, Ellen, whom they referred to as Honey. In 1928, Henry was tragically killed in an automobile accident. The newspaper articles of the time indicated that as many as 20,000 people honoured him by attending his funeral.
After her husband's death, Dorothy ran the travel business and continued committing a great deal of her time to charitable work. She helped open Mount Sinai Hospital in 1922, and was the president of Mount Sinai women's auxiliary. Throughout her life, Dorothy Dworkin played a pivotal role in helping to raise both public and financial support for this important institution.
Over the years, she also became the honorary president of the Sinais, a member of the Mount Sinai Hospital Board, president of the Continental Steamship Ticket Agents Association, a trustee of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, and director of the Labor Lyceum. She continued to run the business and support the activities of Mount Sinai until her death in 1976, at the age of eighty-six.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Dorothy Dworkin's daughter, Honey Arthurs, on 9 April 1973.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of material created and collected by Dorothy Dworkin. This includes documents relating to her work at Mount Sinai Hospital and at Dworkin Travel, personal papers, and family photographs.
Notes
Thirty-three photographs are originals and ten are copies. The negatives and copy photographs were made by the OJA after acquiring the photographs.
Name Access
Dworkin, Dorothy, 1890-1976
Subjects
Businesswomen
Nurses
Philanthropists
Related Material
See fonds #45, Betty Goldstick Lindgren fonds. Her sister's fonds includes family photographs and records.
Creator
Dworkin, Dorothy, 1890-1976
Accession Number
2005-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 41
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Berg fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
41
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[191-]-[ca. 1989]
Physical Description
29 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice "Moishe" Berg (1913-1993) was a Toronto businessman who devoted much of his life to Jewish communal work and particularly to Zionist work. He was born on July 29th, 1913 in Russia to Rachel and Jacob Hochberg. He came to Canada in 1920, with his mother, two brothers, and one sister.
Berg was educated in Toronto and became president of Maple Leaf Press, a printing and office furniture company that was founded in 1945. He was also an active member and leader of Canadian Young Judaea and past president of Ajalon Lodge. He became president of the Central Region of Young Judaea, and later, national president. He was also chairman of the Regional Young Judaea Committee and chairman of the Biluim Committee. Berg was instrumental in starting up Camp Shalom. He also served on the Board of Directors of the YM & YWHA and was active with many other Jewish groups and organizations. He was affliliated with Adath Sholom Congregation. Maurice Berg died on February 27th, 1993.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records related to the personal and professional life of Maurice Berg and his involvement with various Zionist organizations. These organizations include Ajalon Lodge and Canadian Young Judaea. The records include scrapbooks, correspondence, photographs, certificates, programmes, ephemera, clippings, bulletins, and an award certificate.
Notes
Includes 111 photographs : b&w and col., 3 scrapbooks, 1 album of philatelic records, and 1 artifact (Artifact #291).
Name Access
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Subjects
Zionism
Physical Condition
Good.
Related Material
See also photo #4627, 4628, and 4650
See also fonds 2 : 6 : 62 : Item 1
See also fonds 28-1 : 4 : 12
See also fonds 28-1 : 7 : 22
Arrangement
The fonds has been arranged and described as 21 files and 1 item by the archivist. The original order was maintained where it was discernible. The scrapbooks were kept intact though some were taken out of their original physical enclosure where possible for conservation purposes. The records have been placed in acid-free folders
Creator
Berg, Maurice, 1913-1993
Accession Number
1988-11-14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 44
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Weingluck fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
44
Material Format
multiple media
Date
[ca. 1939]-1985
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Henry Weingluck (1902-1987) was an artist and Toronto art gallery owner, who immigrated to Canada in 1948 after being imprisoned in concentration camps in France during the Second World War. Weingluck was born in Zawiercie, Poland on May 7th, 1902, to an Orthodox Jewish family. He was the son of Alter Weingluck, a footwear designer. He studied at art academies in Crakow, Copenhagen, and Berlin and was a pupil of Professor Max Lieberman, president of Berlin's Academy of Arts prior to the Nazi takeover of Germany. Weingluck often depicted Jewish themes in his paintings, in a style he called "academic impressionism." He exhibited in Paris with Kandinsky and Chagall, as well as at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the Jewish Museum, Berlin. He painted portraits of such prominent figures as Albert Einstein, Max Schmelin, Yehudi Menuhin, and Chaim Weizmann.
From 1933 to 1942, Weingluck lived in France and, during the Nazi occupation of France, was imprisoned in eight concentration camps from 1942 to 1945. The Nazis made use of his artistic talent as a barracks designer and portraitist. During this time, the Germans confiscated 375 of his paintings. After the war, Weingluck moved to Tangiers, Morocco, and then emigrated to Canada to join his brother in Toronto. Henry opened H. W. Art Gallery, at 665 College Street, around 1948, and then Weingluck's Art Gallery and Gift Shoppe at 623 College Street, in the 1950s. In 1950, he married his wife Rae (née Simon) Weingluck (1904-1987), whom he met in Canada. Henry died in Toronto in 1987.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material related to the personal life and artistic career of Henry Weingluck. The records pertain to the following: his experiences during the war and in the work camp at Beaulieu, France; his emigration to Canada; his restitution claims for artworks confiscated by the Nazis; his exhibitions; and his art gallery on College Street in Toronto. These records include personal and professional correspondence, certificates, photographs, newspaper clippings, personal writings, publications, programmes, exhibition catalogues, designs and sketches, and artifacts.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 30 photographs, 1 audio cassette, 22 designs and sketches, and 16 objects.
Associated material note: the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives (Montreal) has a collection of paintings and other records of Henry Weingluck.
Name Access
Weingluck, Henry, 1902-1987
Subjects
Artists
Physical Condition
Some of the records are in fragile condition.
Related Material
See also the Ontario Jewish Archives' news clippings file under "Weingluck, Henry"
Creator
Weingluck, Henry, 1902-1987
Accession Number
1988-2-11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Scheuer family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 47
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Scheuer family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
47
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
[187-]-1959
Physical Description
6 folders of textual records
2 window plates : brass
58 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 20 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Scheuer family dates back to at least the eighteenth century in Germany to Moise Scheuer (1765-1846) and Esther Ackerman (1770-1847). Their son, Isaac Scheuer (1809-1889), married Hannchen (Johanna) Strauss (1815-1878) in 1843. Isaac and Johanna had six children: Gabriel (1844-1922), Camilla (1845-1916), Edmund (1847-1943), Emma (1853-1916), Ida (1855-1902), and Benno (Benjamin) (1857-1921).
While Gabriel, Emma, and Ida remained in Europe, Camilla, Edmund, and Benno immigrated to Canada in the late nineteenth century. Camilla came to Hamilton, Ontario after her marriage in 1866 to Herman Levy, co-founder of the Levy Brothers jewellery business. Edmund became a partner in the business when he first immigrated to Canada in 1871, and lived with Camilla and Herman. Camilla became the acknowledged leader of Jewish women in Hamilton. She served in organizations such as the Deborah Ladies' Aid Society, which eventually became an auxiliary of Temple Anshe Sholom, Canada's oldest Reform congregation, often referred to as the Hughson Street Temple. Edmund established the first Sabbath School in Ontario at Anshe Sholom in 1872 and served as president from 1873 to 1886.
After he was established in Hamilton, Edmund returned to Europe in 1873 to marry Oda Strauss (1854-1913) at Forbach, Lorraine, and then brought her back to Canada with him. The couple moved to Toronto in 1886, where he established a wholesale jewellery business on Yonge Street called Scheuer's under his company Edmund Scheuer Limited. Scheuer's was one of the oldest jewellery firms in Toronto and the oldest established wholesale diamond importer in Canada. Edmund's brother, Benno, also worked for the business as the accountant and then secretary-treasurer. Benno was married to Gatella Strauss (1859-1903) and they had three children: Eddie Jr. (1884-1967), Rhoda (1886-1963) and Isadore (1887-1969). Eddie Jr. and Isadore also worked for their uncle's business. Eddie Jr. started as a clerk and then became vice-president, while Isadore started out as a travelling salesman and jeweller. When their uncle retired in 1922, Eddie Jr. took over as president and his brother Isadore became vice-president of Scheuer's.
In addition to his jewellery business, Edmund Scheuer also taught and supervised the religious school at Holy Blossom Synagogue. He went on to serve in every official capacity at Holy Blossom, including vice-chairman and treasurer of the building committee for the Bond Street building. He also founded The Jewish Free School at 206 Beverley Street for Jewish girls and wrote his own textbook for the school, the first Jewish religious school book printed in Toronto. In 1892, he founded the first Jewish benevolent society in Toronto and was later president of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. In 1927, the Beverley Street building, which housed Federation offices, was dedicated in his honour and named the "Scheuer House".
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the Scheuer family in Germany, Hamilton, and Toronto. The fonds is made up primarily of photographs of Scheuer family members and friends. It also includes some textual records, including correspondence, marriage certificates, a Toronto Jewish Free School text book, and Holy Blossom Temple Bulletins. Also included are two brass "Scheuer's" window plates which were likely from Edmund Scheuer's jewellery business of the same name.
Notes
Associated Material Note: See the CJC National Archives collection for Edmund Scheuer at: http://www.cjc.ca/template.php?action=archives&Type=1&Language=EN&Rec=253
Name Access
Scheuer (family)
Subjects
Families
Related Material
See OJA vertical file cabinet for "Scheuer, Edmund" and "Levy, Camilla"
See MG3 A1 Holy Blossom
See MG2 G1C - Edumund Scheuer's Zionist Free School
Saarbrücken City Archives - May have records pertaining to Edmund's brother Gabriel Scheuer (1844-1922) who remained in Germany.
Arrangement
The textual records have been arranged in chronological order into five files. The objects have been described as one file. The fifty-eight photographs have been described as two files and thirty-nine items arranged chronologically
Accession Number
1989-4-2
2004-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
13
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1919-1989
Physical Description
11 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Maurice Solway (1906-2001) was a violinist, music teacher, composer, author and actor who lived and worked for most of his life in Toronto. Although he was highly respected as a musician in Toronto, and thoroughly immersed in the city’s musical culture from the 1920s until the 1980s, his greatest fame came to him later in life, as an actor in the Academy Award nominated NFB short film “The Violin”.
Maurice Solway's family lived at 164 York Street, Toronto, where he was born, in 1906. His parents, Jakob (b.1877) and Roza Solway (b.1877), had only just emigrated that year from Halofzen, Russia, where Jakob had been a musician and band leader. In Canada, Jakob adopted his father's trade and worked as a Kosher butcher, in Toronto’s St. John’s Ward. As a youth, Maurice played the violin in variety programmes with his sister, Dora, accompanying him on piano. His father was his first teacher, but he quickly showed enough promise to warrant private lessons with Harry Adaskin, and later with Dr. Luigi von Kunits, at the Canadian Academy of Music. He also studied at the Hambourg Conservatory in Toronto with Henri Czaplinsky and Geza de Kresz, starting in 1921.
Solway began his professional career with the New Symphony, which later became the Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO). During the 1920s, he also played in the Famous Players Cinema orchestras that accompanied silent films, and performed lunch concerts in Toronto hotel and department store orchestras, professional venues that would disappear by the 1930s.
From 1926 to 1928, Solway left Canada to study in Brussels with the highly regarded violinist, Eugène Ysaÿe. There he befriended other students of Ysaÿe, such as Nathan Milstein, William Primrose, Viola Mitchell, Robert Velton, and Joseph Gingold.
Upon his return to Toronto, Solway gave several recitals that were both critically and publicly well-received. Few such opportunities, however, existed in Canada at the time, and Solway was obliged to find work in-between solo concerts. He also suffered an injury to his left hand while moving a piano in 1929 that required him to adjust his technique for three fingers and interfered with his being able to play comfortably for a number of years.
He was married in 1930 to Anne Cass (1907-1994), and they had a son, Stephen. Facing his financial obligations to his new family, he opted for the more dependable income of orchestral playing versus the riskier and transitory life of a soloist. Besides classical music, he played with jazz groups like the Jolly Bachelor’s Orchestra, Oscar Peterson, Jerome Kern, and Percy Faith, and on numerous recordings for the CBC, CFCA, and CKGW radio stations. He also played chamber music with the Joyce Trio, founded by Simeon Joyce (piano) and featuring Charles Mathe (cello).
In 1952, Solway retired from the TSO, dedicating himself to his chamber playing and radio work. He founded the Solway String Quartet (SSQ) in 1947, with Marcus Adeney (cello), Nathan Green (viola) and Jack Groob (violin). The quartet played a mixed repertoire that included standard classical music with more widely recognized popular songs and new compositions, especially works by Canadian composers such as Howard Cable, John Weinzweig and Jean Coulthard. Sponsored by the Ontario Board of Education and the CBC, the SSQ played rural Ontario towns and broadcast concerts for a wide demographic of music listeners. In 1955, they performed the Canadian debut of the Castelnuovo-Tedesco Quintet for guitar and strings with Andres Segovia. The SSQ, with frequent changes in personnel, continued performing until 1968. Other players in the SSQ included Robert Warburton, Martin Chenhall, Murray Adaskin, Arthur Milligan, Charles Dobias, Eugene Hudson, Berul Sugerman, Joseph Pach and Ivan Romanoff.
In 1973, Solway was invited to act in a short children’s film “The Violin,” co-produced by George Pastic and Andrew Walsh. Solway also contributed the original music to the film, which was nominated for an Academy Award in 1975. Following the success of the film, Solway also appeared on television, making guest appearances with Sharon, Lois and Bram, on the Elephant Show and Mr. Dressup. During this time, his wife Anne traveled with him and managed his appointments.
Solway was also a violin teacher throughout his career. In 1989, he published a preparatory book, Fiddling for Fun: the Visual and Aural Art of Violin Playing, in which he outlined a new theory for violin practice that proposed an easy to use visual system for familiarizing students with intervals and fingerboard positions.
He also wrote an autobiography, Recollections of a Violinist, in 1984, and continued to lecture and speak about music. In 1981 and 1983 he devised a lecture performance series to commemorate Ysaÿe, the proceeds of which went to the establishment of a music scholarship at the Royal Conservatory. As he began to play less frequently in the 1980s, he also began to compose more regularly, completing more than one hundred compositions, primarily works for solo violin and for violin and piano. As a composer, he returned frequently to folk themes and completed a series of songs based on his travels around the world. Among his folk themes are songs inspired by his visits to such diverse countries as Norway, Maui, Japan, Israel and Spain.
Maurice Solway was affiliated with the Beth Tzedec Synagogue and frequently contributed to charity concerts and fundraising efforts for organizations such as the Inner City Angels, a cultural society for disadvantaged children. He died in 2001 in Toronto.
Scope and Content
The Solway fonds is arranged into twelve files. The documents relate to Solway's professional activities as a musician, educator, composer, actor and author. These include printed texts, photographs, original music scores, promotional materials, programmes, audio cassettes, articles, correspondence, radioscripts and a video.
Notes
Includes 31 photographs, 2 v. of text, 1 videocassette (VHS) and 17 audio cassettes.
Name Access
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Subjects
Musicians
Related Material
Fonds 25, Series 11, Item 9: Photo cabinet, photo #179 (oversized)
Photo cabinet, photo #501
Two titles in the archives library collection (1984-12-6) (1 title missing 15 Aug. 2006)
A vertical file has been created for Maurice Solway.
Creator
Solway, Maurice, 1906-2001
Accession Number
1988-10-9
1991-3-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]-1973
Physical Description
1453 negatives ; b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Gordon Mendly (1904–1998) was born Gordon Gimpel Mendlevich in Kielce, Poland on 3 May 1904. He was the son of Israel and Masha Mendlevich. He immigrated to Canada in 1924 as a photographic apprentice and immediately began working out of his home at 305A Queen Street West. This first studio was called International Studio. In 1932, he started Famous Studios, which was located at his residence at 285 College Street. His final studio was at 3145 Bathurst Street, which he sold to fellow photographer Nir Bareket, upon his retirement in 1977. Mendly was married to Sarah (née Rawet) Mendly. He died on 5 January 1998, at the age of ninety-three.
As a studio photographer, Mendly photographed many members of the Jewish community in Toronto. He was also commissioned for weddings and special occasions, along with various events organized by Jewish organizations and agencies. In particular, it is the latter of these commissions that are most illustrative of the Toronto Jewish community. These include events such as the Zionist Organization of Canada's conventions, Cloakmaker Union rallies, and Jewish Old Folks’ Home bingo nights. His work has won awards in both Canada and the United States.
Mendly was also involved in many of the organizations that he photographed. He was the past president of the Herzl Zion Club; an executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress Central Region, JIAS and Toronto B’nai Brith Central Region; board member of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital; vice-president of the Men’s Service Group of the Jewish Home for the Aged; on the executive of the Judaea Lodge, Knights of Phythias No. 52 and the Keltzer Sick Benefit Society; chairman of Jewish National Fund; affiliated with the Brunswick Avenue Talmud Torah and the American Society of Photographers; and co-chairman of the 1956-1961 UJA Metropolitan Division.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of approximately 1449 black and white and colour cellulose acetate negatives, dating from circa 1955 to 1973. The negatives consist of individual and group portraits, Toronto Jewish businesses, special events, meetings and conferences held by various Jewish organizations and agencies in Toronto, and a small sampling of commissioned wedding, anniversary and Bar Mitzvah portraits. The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Portraits, Events and organizations, Businesses, and Weddings, anniversaries and Bar Mitzvahs. The series have been described to the file and/or item level.
Name Access
Mendly, Gordon, 1904-1998
Subjects
Photographers
Physical Condition
Approximately 100 negatives, predominantly from the 1950s, are suffering from vinegar syndrome, as is evident from the odour emanating from them, as well as the general visual conditions. These negatives have been segregated from the rest of the collection and have been housed in boxes CS14-CS16
Some of the negatives are also suffering from “bluing” or “silver mirroring” -- the consequence of oxidative-reductive deterioration. Although this is a slow process, eventually the silver ions will create a fogged effect on the photograph, drastically reducing the quality of the image.
Creator
Mendly, Gordon, 1904-1998
Accession Number
2005-2-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Clairmont fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
32
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1930]-1975
Physical Description
50 cm of textual records
48 photographs : b&w ; 25 x 103 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Harry Wolf Clairmont (1907-1977) was a Toronto labour activist, involved for many years in the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU). Clairmont was born in Chmielnik, in the province of Kielce, Poland, and moved to Canada in December, 1923. He began working in the garment industry as an operator's helper at the J. and G. Cloak Shop in Toronto, and soon became involved in the labour movement and the ILGWU. Claimont held many positions with the ILGWU, including recording secretary of the Operators' Local 14 and business agent of Sportswear Local 199. He was also an active member of the Jewish Workers' National Alliance, the Young Communist League and the Canadian Trotskyist movement. He was married and had two children. He passed away in 1977.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents Harry Clairmont's involvement in the Canadian labour movement, as well as his interest in socialism and communism. Included are publications of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, the Arbeiter Club, the Communist League of America, and the Revolutionary Workers' Party, and records relating to Clairmont's involvement in these organizations and union locals. These records include correspondence, membership cards, pamphlets, clippings, newsletters, anniversary books, bulletins, journals, speeches, financial reports, minute books, and photographs. The small notebook, which only has a few filled page, consists of minutes from the meetings of the Unzer Kamf Worker's Club. The larger notebook, which is completely full, consists of minutes from the meetings of "Local 14." The first page of the latter (starting from the Yiddish side) is a list of the executive in English.
Name Access
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-1977
Subjects
Communism
Labor movement
Socialism
Physical Condition
Most records are in good condition.
Several photographs have been rolled and cannot be flattened.
One photograph is partially attached to glass and will need to be separated by a conservator.
Related Material
See also MG2 E1a
Creator
Clairmont, Harry, 1907-
Accession Number
1979-11-18
1984-1-6
2004-6-3
1998-3-7 [old accession #]
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ralph Hyman fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ralph Hyman fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
35
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[193-?]-[1982?]
Physical Description
71 cm of textual records
ca. 25 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Ralph Hyman (1906–1989) was a Toronto journalist who also played an active role in Jewish community organizations. He was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1906, the son of Russian parents, Sarah and Hyman Radutsky. The name was changed to Hyman in Scotland. Several years after his birth, the family immigrated to Wellington, New Zealand, where they stayed until Ralph was seventeen. In 1924, they moved again, this time to Los Angeles. There, Ralph began his journalism career with the Glendale Times. In 1925, the family moved to Toronto, where Ralph got a job as a reporter for the Toronto Star. In 1928, he moved to the Mail and Empire. When the Mail and Empire merged with the Globe to form the Globe and Mail in 1936, he became a reporter and a political and feature writer. Ralph remained at the Globe and Mail unitl his retirement in 1971. A few months after his retirement, he returned to work as editorial consultant to the Canadian Jewish News. In 1972, he was appointed editor of that publication, a position he filled until his final retirement in 1980.
Ralph Hyman was active in the Joint Community Relations Committee, the Toronto Newspaper Guild and the Toronto Men's Press Club. He was married to Edith Etigson, and they had two children: Gerald David and Roger Leslie.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records relating to the life and career of journalist and news editor, Ralph Hyman. The records include newspaper articles and books written by Ralph Hyman, correspondence, scrapbooks, photographs, periodicals, and ephemera.
Name Access
Hyman, Ralph, 1906-1989
Subjects
Editors
Journalists
Physical Condition
Newspaper articles are in poor condition.
Creator
Hyman, Ralph, 1906-1989
Accession Number
1990-6-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 93
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Cassel fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
93
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1900]-2000, predominant 1929-1947
Physical Description
8 cm of textual records
3 albums (ca. 210 photographs)
2 photographs
Admin History/Bio
Heinz Kassel (1912-2009) (later changed to Henry Cassel) was a German refugee during the Second World War who was classified as an enemy alien by the British government. He spent two years in an internment camp for prisoners of war (POWs) in Quebec. He later became a naturalized Canadian citizen and enlisted in the Canadian military.
Heinz was born on October 25, 1912 in Aschaffenburg, Germany to Adolf and Olga Kassel. Adolf owned a successful banking business which he had inherited from his father. The family resided above the bank and lived a comfortable life during these early years. They moved to Frankfurt around 1920 after Adolf sold his business to buy a partnership in a bank there.
Heinz’s parents had hoped that he would one day become a corporate lawyer. In 1931, in preparation for his future career, he began studying law and economics at Frankfurt University. He enjoyed his initial university years. However, after Hitler’s rise to power in 1933, he became alarmed when his non-Jewish university friends began ignoring him and when the German government passed laws forbidding Jews from practicing law in court. Determined to leave Germany and seek out a better life elsewhere, he begged his parents to immigrate with him to the United States. They refused to go, unwilling to leave behind the life they had worked so hard to build. In accordance with his parents’ wishes, Heinz relocated to nearby Italy instead of the US in 1934. He learned Italian and eventually secured a job with an engineering firm.
Sensing that the political climate in Italy was becoming dangerous for Jewish people, Heinz applied for immigration to the US in early 1939. Eager to leave Italy, he relocated to London to await the approval of his US visa. He left just in time: Britain declared war on Germany less than a week after his arrival. His parents, in turn, managed to escape to Holland. Soon after Britain’s declaration, all immigrants from enemy countries were considered enemy aliens and suspected of being spies.
On May 12, 1940, the British military arrested Heinz and interned him with other German immigrants and POWs. He believed his detainment was only a precautionary measure and that he would be cleared within a few days. However, the British shipped him to the Isle of Man where he remained for several months. Fearing an invasion, the British shipped 3,000 of the POWs, including Kassel, to Quebec, where he was briefly interned at a POW camp set up at the Plains of Abraham. In October 1940, he was moved with 736 other refugees to an abandoned railway yard (later known as “Camp N”) in Newington, near Sherbrooke, Quebec. While there, he confronted a great deal of antisemitism from the guards.
While he was interned in Quebec, the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) interviewed him and other Jewish prisoners in order to lobby for their release. Realizing that the internees were not POWs, the Canadian government declared the camp a refugee camp in 1941. By October 1942, the CJC was successful in helping Heinz secure employment with Benjamin Pape & Company in Toronto.
Heinz met Reta Freeman in Toronto and they were married in November 1944. Reta was born and raised in Toronto. After their nuptials, they were both briefly classified as enemy aliens and had to report to the RCMP on a regular basis. Shortly thereafter, Heinz enlisted in the Royal Canadian Army and was sent to basic training in Manitoba. On January 21, 1946 he was granted landed immigrant status, and in April of that year, he became a citizen.
After the war, Heinz learned that his parents as well as other relatives had been transported to concentration camps and had not survived. He was certainly one of the few fortunate ones to leave the country, despite the circumstances of his removal. He resented being interned for so long, but did not blame the British for rounding him up with other Germans based on their initial fears regarding enemy aliens. His feelings about Canada's treatment of him during that time, however, were not as sympathetic.
The couple lived their lives in Toronto. They first resided at 2346 Yonge Street. Heinz legally changed his name to Henry Cassel. He worked as an accountant and later was a controller for the United Jewish Welfare Fund. The couple had two children: Andrew (b. 1947) and Richard (b. 1951). Reta passed away in August 1962 and Henry later remarried Esther Cassel. He passed away at the age of 96 on February 15, 2009.
Custodial History
Records were created and accumulated by Henry Cassel. His sons donated them to the OJA after his death.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the life of Henry Cassel, particularly his attempt to emigrate from Europe prior to the Second World War and his internment in Canada as a German prisoner of war (POW). Included is personal correspondence between Cassel and his parents; correspondence written by Cassel to potential employers and Canadian Jewish agencies; legal documents and certificates, such as Cassel's birth certificate and passport; family photo albums documenting the family and lives of Henry Cassel and his wife Reta; Cassel's autobiography; a journal and notebook written by Cassel during his internment; and, other internment records, such as government forms and poems and songs written by internees. Also included are newspaper clippings, articles, financial statements, genealogical research, and antisemitic ephemera collected by Cassel. Of particular note are newsletters that were produced during the 1990s by ex-internees who had kept in touch over the years. Records are arranged into 16 files.
Notes
Textual records in the fonds were reduced from ca. 20 cm to 8 cm. Please see accession record for further details about the culled material.
Associated material notes: for related records at other archives, please see: the UJRA case files at the National CJC Archive in Montreal and the holdings at Library and Archives Canada (such as, the Directorate of Internment Operations series in the Department of National Defense fonds R112-0-2-E)
Name Access
Cassel, Henry, 1912-2009
Subjects
Europe--Emigration and immigration
Prisoners of war
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
See: Canadian Jewish Congress case files in RG 282 and accession #2005-10-1.
Creator
Cassel, Henry, 1912-2009
Accession Number
2010-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Lipa Green fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
20
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
[190-]-1979
Physical Description
42 cm of textual records
69 photographs : b&w and sepia (23 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Lipa (Louis) Green (1899–1976) was born on 15 April 1899 in Usupow, Poland. He immigrated to Toronto in 1910 and later began work as a bricklayer. In 1924, Lipa married Fanny Green and had three sons: Abraham (Al), Harold and Sam; and three daughters: Deana (Weiman), Rookie (Goldstein), and Shavy (Tishler). In 1948, with partner, Arthur Weinstock, he founded the Greenview Construction Company, later to be renamed Greenwin. Green's sons, Al and Harold, along with Weinstock's son-in-law Al Latner, later became involved in the business.
Green was a prominent Jewish communal leader and philanthropist in Toronto and was affiliated with organizations such as the Labor Zionists (Farband), the Jewish Vocational Service and the Jewish Public Library. He was a strong advocate of the Yiddish language and was involved with many Yiddish committees, both at the local and national levels. The current building for Jewish agencies in Toronto is named the Lipa Green Building for Jewish Community Services.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Lipa's son, Harold, before being donated to the OJA in January 1978.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting Lipa Green's personal life as well as his professional and philanthropic endeavours. Included are financial documents, event invitations and programs, meeting minutes, photographs, personal, business and organizational correspondence, speeches and writings, a scrapbook, records on a cooperative Jewish summer resort near Pickering, Ontario, as well as some material produced by other organizations and collected by Green during the course of his life. Most of the personal correspondence, speeches and other writings are in Yiddish, including Green's reminiscences on his life in Poland and his Bar Mitzvah. The files have been grouped according to personal records, business records, organizational records and ephemera.
Name Access
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Subjects
Businesspeople
Immigrants--Canada
Philanthropists
Physical Condition
Some of the photographs are in very poor condition and require conservation work.
Related Material
See Gordon Mendly Fonds 18 for a portrait of Lipa Green.
Arrangement
The records had been previously arranged as MG6 A. Many of the files were kept or combined, but several new files were also created to better reflect the records in the fonds. Several files were also culled as they did not relate to the mandate of the OJA. See the accession record for further information on the culled materials.
Creator
Green, Lipa, 1899-1976
Accession Number
1978-1-4
2004-5-150
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 23
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Harry Simon fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
23
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1931-[198-]
Physical Description
25 cm of textual records
17 photographs (6 negatives)
Admin History/Bio
Harry Simon (1909-1993) was born in Russia on 15 July 1909 and immigrated to Canada with his parents and two younger brothers in 1923. In 1930, he married Eva Millman and together they had two sons, Morris and Norman. Simon was involved in a number of labour unions and organizations during his lifetime, namely the Fur Workers' Union, the AFL-CIO, the Canadian Labour Congress and the Labour Zionist Movement.
In 1926, at the age of 17, Simon left his schooling in Toronto and went to work in a fur factory. He joined the International Fur Workers' Union and at the age of 20, Simon held the distinction of being the youngest business agent elected to a union in Canada. He joined the Canadian Commonwealth Federation (CCF) in 1933 and ran as a political candidate in the 1937 provincial election for the St. Andrew riding in Toronto.
Simon also served as the Canadian representative for the American Federation of Labour from 1944 to 1956. In 1956, he was appointed to the Canadian Labour Congress, becoming the CLC's Ontario regional director of organization until his retirement in 1974. Simon also held the position of national chairman of the Jewish Labour Committee of Canada and as president of the Labour Zionist Movement of Canada. He was also a member of the national executive of the Canadian Jewish Congress.
After his retirement Simon often spoke about labour issues at various functions and events when requested. He died on 22 December 1993 at the age of 84.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of the records related to the professional career of Harry Simon. This includes meeting minutes, general correspondence, speeches, posters, flyers, booklets, programmes and photographs. The bulk of the material is in the form of correspondence sent to or from Harry Simon. There is also a small amount of biographical material and a number of photographs, which have been described at the item level.
Name Access
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Labor leaders
Physical Condition
Some photographs require conservation work.
Arrangement
The files were originally arranged by Harry Simon according to organization. This original order has been maintained by the archivist.
Creator
Simon, Harry, 1909-1993
Accession Number
1988-5-6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 33
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
William Stern fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
33
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1913]-1984
Physical Description
264 photographs (98 negatives) : b&w and col. ; 28 x 35 cm or smaller
2 folders of textual records
Admin History/Bio
William (Bill) I. Stern (1921-2007) was born Izick Stern in Toronto on 24 February, 1921, to Moishe (Morris) Shternshis (ca. 1893-1976) and Fanny Rumianek (ca. 1896-1991). He was an active and respected member of both the Toronto and Hamilton Jewish communities.
Bill began his education in Toronto at Grace Street and Givens Street elementary schools. He later attended the Central Technical Institute for chemistry. In the late 1930s, Bill left Central Tech to work for his father, but eventually returned to school until the start of the Second World War. At this time, Bill enlisted in the Royal Canadian Airforce and served as a Leading Aircraftsman for three years in France, Belgium and Germany. At the end of the war, he returned to Central Tech and completed his junior matriculation (grade 12) in January of 1946. In December 1946, Bill married his first wife, Toronto-born Laura Rubinstein (1923-1963). The couple had two children, Hershel (1953-) and Sheila (1957-1996).
From 1946 to 1951, Bill studied social work at the University of Toronto through a government sponsored program for war veterans. When he graduated, he practiced social work at several community institutions such as the Children's Aid Society, the University Settlement House and St. Christopher House, in Toronto. In 1956, he was offered a position as director of activities for the Hamilton Jewish Community Centre (JCC). He remained in Hamilton at this post until 1960 and then returned to Toronto as a divisional director of the United Jewish Welfare Fund, where he initiated the fund's Social Planning Department. In 1963, upon the death of his wife Laura, Bill returned to Hamilton as the director of the JCC, and later the executive director of the Hamilton Council of Jewish Organizations (CJO), a position which he held for nine years from 1964 until 1973.
After two years with the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Buffalo, Bill returned to Toronto in 1975 and briefly served two years as the executive director of the Canadian Zionist Federation, Central Region. He then returned to private practice, working as a community consultant and later as a job placement coach at the University of Toronto's School of Social Work.
Bill was an active supporter of the Toronto Jewish Film Festival and the author of "You Don't Have to Be Jewish", a book on Jewish film. He held several positions with philanthropic organizations such as the United Jewish Welfare Fund, the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest, and the Canadian Society for the Weizmann Institute of Science. He was also a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. Bill lived in Toronto with his second wife of more than thirty years, Elizabeth Uptegrove (1952-), until his passing on 18 April 2007.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Bill Stern until they were donated to the Archives.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of photographs documenting the Stern and Rumianek families, individuals and organizations from the Hamilton and Toronto Jewish communities, as well as Bill Stern and his fellow servicemen during the Second World War.
The fonds has been arranged into the following series: Family photographs; Military photographs; Hamilton Jewish community photographs; Toronto Jewish community photographs; and Camp photographs. The photographs have been described at the item level and have been arranged chronologically. The textual material consists of two files containing records related to Bill Stern's professional and philanthropic career, as well as some family invitations.
Name Access
Stern, William, 1921-2007
Subjects
Communities
Families
World War, 1939-1945
Related Material
See "Stern family" clipping file
Creator
Stern, William, 1921-2007
Accession Number
1980-2-1
1981-9-4
1985-6-6
1986-1-8
1991-5-5
1991-5-6
1994-1-4
2004-5-96
2004-5-135
2004-5-141
2005-5-2
2005-5-9
2006-2-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 49
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Benjamin Brown fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
49
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1902-1949
Physical Description
ca. 1500 architectural and technical drawings
6 photographs : b&w ; 38 x 30 cm or smaller
16 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Benjamin Brown (ca. 1888-1974) was the first practicing Jewish architect in Toronto. Born in what is now Lithuania, he arrived in Toronto at an early age and soon after, quit school to take a job in a garment manufacturing factory to help out his impoverished family. Not finding this career to his liking, Brown enrolled in the Ontario School of Art and Design with the intention of becoming an artist. When this profession proved financially unfeasible, Brown decided to pursue a career in architecture. After completing his high school equivalency, he enrolled in the University of Toronto architectural program, graduating in 1913. Soon after, Brown opened up a practice with fellow architect Robert McConnell, which lasted until the early 1920s. After the partnership ended, Brown set up an independent practice, which he maintained until his retirement in 1955.
Scope and Content
The fonds documents Brown’s design work and renovations of existing buildings through his original drawings, renderings, and building blueprints. The fonds consists of approximately 1500 drawings that are organized into about 150 projects. These projects include single-family residences, apartment buildings, commercial and industrial buildings, as well as synagogue and other community buildings. Many of Brown's buildings were designed in the Art Deco style, with some containing Georgian, Craftsman, Colonial Revival, Tudor and Romanesque elements.
Brown's most important commissions include the Beth Jacob Synagogue located on Henry Street, which was one the largest synagogues in Toronto, and the Balfour Building, an office tower built in the Art Deco style. The designs of Mendel Granatstein’s mansion, which contained a retractable roof for Sukkoth, and a colour sketch of the Primrose Club, which is currently the University of Toronto Faculty Club, may also be of interest to researchers. The fonds also includes some of Brown's files containing articles and illustrations from architecture and design journals of the early twentieth century, which he used as a resource to assist him with his work.
Fonds includes six photographs, one of the Balfour Building, one of Cumberland Hall, and four of Brown as a young man.
Notes
Architectural plans of a lead mine in Burnt River Ontario have been sent to the Kawartha Lakes Archives.
Name Access
Brown, Benjamin, 1890-1974
Subjects
Architects
Creator
Brown, Benjamin, 1890-1974
Accession Number
1975
1987-9-3
1989-10-6
2004-5-109
2004-5-139
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 52
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dora Till fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
52
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1921-1986
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Dora Till (1896-1987) was a leading member of the Toronto Jewish community. She helped found and served on the executives and boards of many organizations, including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, the United Jewish Welfare Fund (UJWF), the Candian Jewish Congress Central Region, and the Baycrest Hospital Women's Auxiliary. She was honoured numerous times in her life with awards and tributes for her contributions to the Jewish community.
Till was born in New York City on 20 March 1896, one of six children of Max and Yeta Tobias. Her parents had emigrated from Poland prior to 1892. When Dora was four, the family moved to Toronto where Max Tobias worked as a tailor. In her teens, Till was an active member of two social clubs for girls, the Boot and Shoe Society (for mothers and children in need) and the Herzl Girls Club.
Dora Tobias married Morris S. Till on 21 May 1916, in Toronto. They had two children, Sigmund and Cecile, both of whom she outlived. Sigmund died tragically at the age of 11 after a sudden illness. Cecile married Frank Goldhar and they had two children, Sheila Anne and Meyer Garson.
In 1918, Till joined the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society and she served as its vice-president for the next fifteen years. This was the beginning of a lifetime career in family welfare, health care and services for the aged. Till helped found and was the first president of the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home located in Bronte and then Tollandale, which provided mothers and children in need with a two-week holiday in the country.
From the 1920s until the 1940s, Till served on several boards including the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, and the United Jewish Welfare Fund, as well as the Welfare Fund's Women's Division and Women's Service Council. In 1950, she became the first woman to be named honourary vice-president of the UJWF. In 1955, after many years affiliation with the Jewish Home for the Aged, Dora Till organized the newly built Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care's Women's Auxiliary, becoming its first president. She also served for 40 years on the executive board of the Family and Child Service Bureau, the precursor to Jewish Family & Child Services. Till was an active member of many other Jewish organizations, including the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah and the National Council of Jewish Women, B'nai Brith Women, the Mount Sinai Women's Auxiliary, the Jewish Camp Council, and Toronto United Community Appeal - Community Chest. She was also a member of Goel Tzedec Congregation and its successor, Beth Tzedec Congregation.
Dora Till was honoured with several awards and tributes in her lifetime for her contributions to Jewish life, health and welfare in Toronto. In 1956, the Dora and Morris Till Bungalow at the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home was dedicated. In 1969, she was the first woman to recieve UJWF's Ben Sadowski Award for Jewish Community Service. As well, in 1977, she received the Queen's Silver Jubilee medal for outstanding community service. In 1983 a Baycrest Centre tribute dinner was held in her honour and in 1984, the top floor of the Baycrest Centre was dedicated to her. This was the culmination of a lifetime devoted to social welfare and community service, and it came just a few years before Till's death, on 22 November 1987.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Dora Till's granddaughter, Mrs. Sheila Gottlieb, until they were donated to the OJA in 1987.
Scope and Content
This fonds consists of records documenting the personal and philanthropic activities of Dora Till, including her ongoing involvement with the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, the Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary, the United Jewish Welfare Fund, and to a lesser extent other organizations that she was involved or affiliated with. Till's records of the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home are some of the few to have survived from this important social service organization.
The organizational records in the fonds include minutes, correspondence, reports, speeches, financial records, newsclippings, pamphlets, brochures, invitations, architectural drawings, and photographs, primarily of the Mothers and Babes Rest Home and the Baycrest Centre. As well, there are two artifacts: a Baycrest Centre pin and a gold shovel from the groundbreaking ceremony. The personal records in the fonds include family photographs and portraits, writings, newsclippings and general correspondence.
The fonds has been arranged into eight series: 1. Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home Association. 2. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Women's Auxiliary. 3. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Heritage Museum Committee. 4. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care Furnishings Committee. 5. Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care : other committees. 6. United Jewish Welfare Fund. 7. Other organizations. 8. Personal. The records have been described to the file level, while a selection of photographs have been scanned and described at the item level.
Notes
Physical description note: includes 197 photographs (54 negatives), 9 architectural drawings, and 2 objects
Name Access
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
For related material on the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, please see: Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds 61, Federation of Jewish Philanthropies fonds 66, United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds 67, Ida Lewis Siegel fonds 15, and the Rebecca Kamarner family fonds 11.
For related material on the Baycrest Centre Women's Auxiliary, please see: Pat Joy Alpert fonds 77 and fonds 14.
For related material on National Council of Jewish Women please see fonds 38.
Arrangement
This fonds had previously been arranged and described as MG6 H. The current arrangement was implemented by the archivist in 2010 and as a result, several files from the former MG were culled or merged. Therefore, the former MG finding aid is no longer accurate.
Creator
Till, Dora, 1896-1987
Accession Number
1987-1-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Pappenheim family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 113
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Pappenheim family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
113
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1906-2005
Physical Description
2.0 m of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Albert Pappenheim (1921-1984) was born to Jonas (1877-1941) and Irma (1881-1941) Pappenheim in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. He had three siblings, Ernst (b. 1911), Karla (m. Goldschmidt) (1912-1989), and Ruth (m. Possen) (1915-2010). From 1936-1938, Albert studied at the Jewish Teachers Seminary (ILBA) in Wurzburg, Germany, but his studies were interrupted due to Kristallnacht. Albert was sent to study at a yeshiva in England, but was declared an illegal immigrant with the start of the war and was interned and sent to Canada in 1940. He was interned at Ile aux Noix in Richelieu River in Quebec along with other yeshiva students. Upon his release from the camp, he resumed his rabbinical studies and became a prominent rabbi and community leader in Toronto. He married Rhoda Helen (née Kabatznik) Pappenheim (1925-1987) who was born to Eli and Sarah Kabatznik. Rhoda studied to be a teacher at Toronto Normal School. Albert and Rhoda had a daughter Irma. Albert's sister and brother-in-law Karla and Max Goldschmidt emigrated to Palestine. Sister and brother-in-law Ruth and Leo Possen eventually joined Albert in St. Catharines after the war.
Albert received a BA in Oriental Languages in 1947 and MA in 1949 at the University of Toronto. He also continued his training at Yeshiva Torath Chaim Toronto under Rabbi Abraham Price and took the rabbinic exam in 1949. He led the Congregation B'nai Israel in St. Catharines, Ontario from 1948-1953. In 1953, he moved to Lexington, Kentucky to be the rabbi of Ohava Zion Congregation. While in Lexington, he was also a lecturer at the University of Kentucky in Hebrew and Biblical History. In 1956, he returned to Canada to be the rabbi of Beth David Congregation in Downsview, Toronto. Beth David amalgamated with B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1960 and with Beth Am Congregation in 1977. Albert also served on many rabbinical organizations and committees. He was the Chairman of the Education Committee for the United Synagogues of America, Ontario Region; Secretary of the Rabbinical Assembly, Central Region, Canada; and Chairman of the Religious Affairs Committee of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region. His service and contributions to the rabbinical community was recognized through an honourary doctorate from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1975.
Custodial History
The records were donated by Irma Pappenheim, daughter of Albert and Rhoda Pappenheim in three accessions. Some of the letters created and accumulated in researching the Pappenheim family history were in the custody of her aunt Karla.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of records documenting the life and activities of Rabbi Albert Pappenheim and his family, including genealogical research conducted by his daughter Irma Pappenheim. The majority of records document Albert's activities as a rabbi at B'nai Israel Congregation in St. Catharines, Ontario; Ohava Zion Congregation in Lexington, Kentucky; and Beth David B'nai Israel Beth Am Congregation in Toronto. Records include sermons and related research, newspaper clippings, newsletters, bulletins, scrapbooks, photographs, correspondence, and administrative records. Also included are copies and originals of family correspondence and related material chronologically documenting the Pappenheim family history from the 1930s onwards, including translations. Other records document Albert's personal life and education with some material related to his wife Rhoda and her mother Sarah Kabatznik and include posthumous tributes, letters, and clippings.
Fonds is arranged into six series: 1. Personal, 2. Posthumous material, 3. Sermons and writings, 4. Rabbinical activities and congregational records, 5. Genealogical research 6. Scrapbooks
Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes ca. 250 photographs, 4 scrapbooks, 2 CDs, 3 audiocassettes, 1 audio disc and 1 USB key.
Duplicate copies of genealogical research, sermon notes, and other publications were culled.
Arrangement
Original order was preserved whenever discernible with sermons and writings largely organized into subject files and genealogical research in chronological order.
Creator
Pappenheim (family)
Accession Number
2005-10-1
2017-1-14
2017-8-12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 117
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
117
Material Format
textual record
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1926-1947
Physical Description
3 cm of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and sepia (tiff)
Admin History/Bio
Bella Diamant (m. Hershenhorn) was the daughter of Moishe and Sarah Diamant. She was born in Ostrowiec (Ostrovietz), Poland and had five siblings: Esther, Chaim Myer, David, Baruch, and Ruth. Bella met her future husband, Samuel Hershenhorn, in Poland. He was the son of Mendel and Miriam Hershenhorn from Drildz. The family arrived in Toronto sometime during the early 1920s; Mendel arriving first followed by Miriam and Samuel. The marriage between Bella and Samuel was arranged by their families and so Bella was sent to Toronto to be with him in 1927. They married on 13 Nov. 1927. Together they had three children: Ruth (Rishie), Esti and Lee. Samuel worked for a slipper and spat manufacturer and then started his own company: The Canadian Spat and Slipper Company. He was a member of the Dirildzer Sick Benefit Society. Bella was a housewife. Many of Bella's relatives perished during the Holocaust, including both her parents, her brother David who died with his wife and daughter on a forced march, and her sister Ruth who was murdered by the Nazis alongside her young daughter. Chaim Myer was sent to live with Bella and Samuel in Toronto prior to the onset of the war and therefore survived. Baruch and Esther both survived the Holocaust and eventually moved to New York City.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of letters written to Bella Diamant Hershenhorn from relatives in Poland and Frankfurt. The pre-war letters are from Bella's father Moishe in Poland as well as Bella's sibings and cousins, usually added as additional notes and postscripts onto Moishe's letters. The post-war letters are from Bella's sister Esther and brother Baruch in Frankfurt, who both survived the Holocaust. The letters are written in Yiddish and Polish and have accompanying English translations. Also included are several scanned copies of photographs depicting Bella on the SS Estonia, en route to Canada (ca. 1927), and with various relatives in Poland prior to immigration.
Notes
REPRODUCTION RESTRICTON NOTE: Donor must be notified prior to publication of letters.
Name Access
Hershenhorn, Bella, ca. 1906-1999
Subjects
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Letters
Arrangement
The letters have been arranged chronologically.
Places
Ostrowiec (Sokolów Podlaski, Poland)
Toronto (Ont.)
Frankfurt am Main (Germany)
Accession Number
2016-12-44
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Rosenbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 121
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Henry Rosenbaum fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
121
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Date
1928-2015
Physical Description
247 photographs : b&w and col. (1 negative); 20 x 25 or smaller
13 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
Henry "Hanoch" Rosenbaum (1925-2015) was born in Radom, Poland. He was the second youngest of eight children born to Rachel Rosenbaum (née Katz) and Moshe Rosenbaum.
In the aftermath of the Second World War, Herny learned the fate of Radom's Jewish civilian population. Two thirds of Radom's Jewish population were victims of mass murder and perished in the extermination camp Treblinka, immediately following the first liquidation of Radom's large ghetto in August 1942. Henry's parents, two siblings, and their families were among the innocent victims murdered during the Holocaust.
Henry Rosenbaum met his wife Bella Rotbard (1925–2012) while living in an Italian DP camp after the war. Although Bella was also from Radom, she did not know the Rosenbaum family. Bella's parents, her sixteen-year-old sister, and four-year-old brother, as well as most of her parents' extended families, were also victims of the Holocaust.
While in Italy, the Joint Distribution Committee funded "mock kibbutzim," preparing Holocaust survivors for immigration to Palestine and kibbutz life. Bella, a one-time member of the secular Jewish youth movement Hashomer Hatzair, believed that she was destined to be a "kibbutznik," a member of a kibbutz.
In 1946, Bella and Henry immigrated to Palestine as part of the Bricha. The Bricha supported the illegal immigration of Holocaust survivor refugees to Palestine. They spent their first few days in Atlit, a British Mandate detainee camp and soon settled on kibbutz. Bella married Henry in 1946 and moved to an apartment in Ramat Gan. During this time Henry served in the IDF’s motor pool.
Henry, Bella, and their young daughter Brenda (b. 1949) immigrated to Toronto in 1952. With the assistance of a relative, Henry gained employment in a print shop sweeping floors. Henry soon advanced to machine operator and in 1961 opened his own print shop, Trio Press Limited.
Bella worked in the garment industry, sewing collars onto shirts and earned her wages through piece work. She continued working in manufacturing up until the birth of her second child Murray (b. 1961).
Henry Rosenbaum was an active life-long member of the Radom Society and served as editor for their quarterly Yiddish and English journal the Voice of Radom.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Henry Rosenbaum's daughter Brenda Bornstein.
Scope and Content
Fonds illustrates the family history of Henry Rosenbaum and the life he and his wife Bella Rosenbaum rebuilt in Canada. Photographs document: early life in Poland, displaced persons camp in Italy, immigration to Palestine, military service in the Israel Defense Forces, family life in Israel, immigration and settlement in Canada and many milestone events and celebrations in Toronto, Ontario. Additional photographs of the Radom Society in Toronto. The majority of the photographs were assembled in a scrapbook created by their daughter Brenda Bornstein in celebration of her parents' thirtieth wedding anniversary (1976). In addition, there is a more comprehensive biography written by Henry and Bella's son-in-law Eric Bornstein.
Fonds consists of records relating to Henry Rosenbaum and his affiliation with B’nai Radom. Included are programs and souvenir booklets from the 1962 unveiling of a monument in memory of the Jewish Martyrs and Heroes of Radom and Vicinity (Poland), annual Holocaust remembrance (Yizkor) events published in 1987 and 2010; and a 50th Anniversary of Liberation publication. Books include a Yiddish language bound copy of the Voice of Radom from 1963-1965, an English language bound copy of the Voice of Radom 1983–1989 and Henry Rosenbaum’s personal memoir published in 1995. In addition, there are eight photographs of Henry's great-grandchildren, and a photo of Henry with his daughter Brenda.In addition there is a collection of speeches written by Henry Rosenbaum primarily for family milestone events such as weddings, birthdays, bar mtizvahs, and bat mitzvahs. In addition there is a copy of a presentation made to the Radom Congregation on the occasion of Israel's twenty-fifth year of independence, a Hebrew-language letter of congratulations, and several personal letters written by Murray Rosenbaum (the latter are addressed to his parents while travelling to Israel and Europe). The personal speeches written and delivered by Henry were in honour of the following relatives: Rivi Anklewicz, Marshall Lofchick, Murray Rosenbaum, Elana Aizic, Regina Goldstein, Brenda Rosenbaum, Eric "Ricky" Bornstein, Murray Severin, Robin Severin-Weingort, Rachel Bornstein, Susan Szainwald, Daniel Bornstein, Sholom Rosenbaum, Bella Rosenbaum, Linda Goldstein, and Leon Aizic.
Subjects
Holocaust survivors
Creator
Rosenbaum, Henry, 1925-2015
Places
Poland
Italy
Palestine
Israel
Toronto (Ont.)
Accession Number
2015-10-5
2017-2-13
2019-7-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 37
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
37
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1895]-1979
Physical Description
690 photographs : b&w and col. negatives ; 26 x 21 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Gilbert Studios was originally called Elite Studios and was located at 513 Queen Street West, Toronto. The owner, Nathan Gittelmacher, immigrated to Toronto from Kiev, Ukraine after the First World War. He first worked as a photographer at Empire Studios, and then in 1922, opened up his own studio, Elite Studios, at 513 Queen Street West, which serviced a largely Jewish clientele, photographing weddings, bar mitzvahs, as well as Jewish community events. The studio moved to 615 Queen St. West in July 1923
.During the 1940s, the family changed its name to Gilbert and subsequently altered the name of the business to Gilbert Studios. His son, Al Gilbert, was born in 1922, and started working in the family business in 1941, when he was 19 years of age. He eventually assumed control of it after his father retired. He moved the studio to Eglinton Avenue and then later to Davenport Road, its current location.
Early on in his career, Al made a name for himself as a portrait photographer. At that time, he mostly catered to the Jewish community, photographing brides, rabbis, businessmen and communal events and celebrations. Over the years, he branched out and photographed prominent individuals from the Italian community of Toronto, as well as well as many of the mayors and councilmen and women from Toronto, due to his multi-year contract with the city. In addition, he photographed some of the most important people of our time – from Canada and abroad – including artists, politicians, scientists, philanthropists, athletes, and religious figures.
Over the years, Al won many competitions, awards and accolades. He is a three-time recipient of the prestigious Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC) photographer of the year award. He has also been named a Fellow of the photographic societies in Canada, Britain and the United States. Al was also the first recipient of the Yousuf Karsh award. In 1990, he was recognized for his contribution to the nation as an artist with the Order of Canada award. Finally, in 2007, he was awarded the Professional Photographers of America’s Lifetime Achievement Award. He died in 2019 at the age of 96.
Gilbert Studios is still in business today.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of images taken by Nathan and Al Gilbert. In addition, there are some images the Gilbert family acquired, from the early 1900s, that have historical significance to the Toronto Jewish community.
Although the Gilberts photographed a variety of people and organizations, the individuals and groups included in this fonds are either Jewish in origin or connected to the Jewish community.
The fonds has been arranged into nine series: Negev dinners; B'nai B'rith Sportsmen Lodge dinners; Zionist Centre cornerstone ceremony; Al Gilbert portraits; Nathan Gilbert portraits; weddings; Jewish Community events; Jewish clubs businsesses and organizations; and Miscellaneous collection.
Notes
Positive digital scanned images are available for all of the described negatives.
Name Access
Elite Studios (Toronto, Ont.)
Gilbert, Al, 1923-2019
Gilbert, Nathan
Gilbert Studio
Physical Condition
Some negatives are suffering from vinegar syndrome.
Related Material
See also the Albert Gilbert fonds (Reference # R9086-0-X-E) at Library and Archives Canada
Creator
Gilbert Studios (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1991-6-2
1991-4-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morley Torgov fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 108
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morley Torgov fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
108
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Date
1938-2011
Physical Description
5.2 m of textual records and graphic material
Admin History/Bio
Morley Torgov (b. 1927) is a Canadian novelist and short story writer and former commercial lawyer.
Torgov was born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario to Allan (b. Russia, 8 July 1895-1964?) and Janey (née Colish) Torgov (b. England, 1901-d. Sault Ste. Marie, July 1926). Allan Torgov owned and operated a clothing store in Sault Ste. Marie named Allan's. Morley married Anna Pearl (née Cohen) in 1948 and had two children, Sarah Jane Steinberg and Alexander Torgov (b. 1959-d. 2009), and four grandchildren.
Torgov was educated at the University of Toronto, receiving his bachelor of laws degree from Osgoode Hall and was called to the bar in 1954. He became a partner in the law firm Olsch, Torgov, Cohen and specialized in commercial law. While practicing law in Toronto during the 1960s, he turned to writing. Torgov's first book, A Good Place to Come From (1974), a comic memoir of growing up Jewish in Sault Ste. Marie, was made into a CBC miniseries and won the Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour. Torgov continued to write other books including the Outside Chance of Maximillian Glick (1982), which won him his second Stephen Leacock Memorial Medal for Humour. The CBC produced a television series based on this work and the book was published in several languages. This success was followed by St. Farb's Day (1990), which won the Toronto Book Award and the National Jewish Book Award for fiction. Other published works include the Abramsky Variations (1977), the War to End All Wars (1998), Stickler and Me (2002), Murder in A-major (2008), and the Mastersinger from Minsk (2012).
Torgov's writings also include several screenplays for television and film and numerous essays and articles for the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, the Montreal Gazette, the Canadian Lawyer and the New York Times Sunday Magazine. Torgov has been honored by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, naming their annual award the TORGI after Torgov, the first recipient of that award in 1984. In 2005, he received the Order of Mariposa, a lifetime recognition award from the Leacock Society. In 2010, he received the Order of Canada as an acknowledgement of his contributions to Canadian society.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of material related to the life and work of Morley Torgov. Included are literary drafts and working papers, reviews, speeches, presentations, public addresses, memorabilia, sketches and drawings, photographs, correspondence, newspaper and magazine articles, and Torgov's original file folders with jottings of ideas and references for future use.
Notes
SCOPE AND CONTENT NOTE: The scope and content for most of the file level descriptions are taken verbatim from the original description provided by Mr. Torgov at the time of donation and therefore is written in the first person.
Name Access
Torgov, Morley, 1927-
Subjects
Authors
Related Material
Researchers should consult the Morley Torgov fonds at the Sault Ste. Marie Public Library for other records.
Arrangement
Records were arranged at the file level by the creator. This original arrangement has been maintained by the archivist.
Places
Sault Ste. Marie (Ont.)
Accession Number
1984-12-8
1986-12-6
1989-12-7
1990-12-10
1992-12-4
1995-12-4
1998-12-2
1999-12-3
2000-12-2
2002-12-6
2003-12-4
2004-12-1
2005-3-2
2005-12-3
2006-12-6
2007-12-16
2008-12-7
2011-12-3
2018-8-18
Source
Archival Descriptions
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