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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Publication Committee series
Y-Time newspaper sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 3-1; File 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Publication Committee series
Y-Time newspaper sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
3-1
File
32
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of two issues of the Y-Time newspaper.
Accession Number
1984-7-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
20
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1931]
Physical Description
1 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 20 x 25 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Back row, left to right: Selig Truster, Kaplansky, Dr. Lax, Harold Burcofsky, Rubinoff.
Third row: Saul Sand, Sylvia Persiko, [unknown], [unknown], Eddie Greenbaum (Green), Kirshenblatt.
Second row: Kaiman, Fanny (Frances) Sher, Principal Chaikes, [unknown], Toby Kirshenbaum, Willie Lindenbaum.
First row: Freddie Steinhouse, Joey Greenbaum, Lou Kishenbaum, [unknown], Solly Freeman (Freeman's Rental).
Notes
Acquired 1974.
Name Access
Dovid Pinsky Club
Farband Folk Shule
Subjects
Clubs
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1978-1981
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1978-7-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1978-7-8
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 28 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Date
[194-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of a farewell party at the Congregation Beth Israel in Peterborough, Ontario.
Places
Peterborough (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 117; Item 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
117
Item
21
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[ca. 1930]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tiff) ; 208 MB
Scope and Content
This item is a scanned photograph of Myer Diamant.
Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Digitization of the original photograph was done by the OJA Archivist. A master tiff file and a jpg access copy were made.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Kaufman, Myer
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Kaufman, Myer
Page Number
266
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Koralnik, Myer
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Koralnik, Myer
Page Number
240
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Weisman, Myer
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Weisman, Myer
Page Number
368
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1978 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1978 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-4
Material Format
graphic material
object
Date
1978
Physical Description
7 photographs (5 negatives)
1 button
Admin History/Bio
In 1978, the Walkathon was renamed the Walk for Israel, a name that highlighted the event's connection to Israel. The Walk's theme was celebrating 30 years of Israel's statehood, emphasized with a 30 kilometre route. The Walk was chaired by David Bloom and was distinguished by the amount of competition it involved. Walkers could sign up in teams and compete to raise the most money and/or cover the greatest distance. Teams were registered from schools, brotherhoods, clubs, youth groups, and various professions. A number of professional athletes, from the Toronto Argos, Maple Leafs, and Blue Jays, were present at various checkpoints to greet walkers. About 9000 people turned out on the day of the Walk, which finished up with a gala birthday celebration at Earl Bales Park.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Passenger Names
Fox, Myer & Max
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Fox, Myer & Max
Page Number
442
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Name
Harry Fidler
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1977-1978
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Harry Fidler
Number
OH 175
Interview Date
1977-1978
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Allan Grossman
Total Running Time
30 minutes 35 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Harry Fidler was born in 1900 in Ostrovtze. He came to Toronto at age ten in 1910. He married in 1922. Harry was very active with the Ostrovtzer Synagogue and served on the executive since 1922.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Ostrovtzer Synagogue
Grossman, Allan
Fidler, Harry
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 175 Fidler\OH 175 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Harry Fidler and Allan Grossman discuss the decline of the Ostrovtzer Synagogue.

In this clip, Harry Fidler and Allan Grossman reminisce about the Ostrovtzer Synagogue at the Cecil Street location.

Address
340 College Street
Source
Landmarks

The Raxlen brothers were born in Toronto in Cabbagetown, where their father operated a grocery store. The four brothers included Saul, Benjamin, Alexander and Sam. All of the brothers graduated in medicine during the 1930s, except for Sam, who became a dentist. Together, they opened up the Raxlen Clinic in 1937, which was located on Carleton Street.
Address
340 College Street
Time Period
1953-1978
Scope Note
The Raxlen brothers were born in Toronto in Cabbagetown, where their father operated a grocery store. The four brothers included Saul, Benjamin, Alexander and Sam. All of the brothers graduated in medicine during the 1930s, except for Sam, who became a dentist. Together, they opened up the Raxlen Clinic in 1937, which was located on Carleton Street.
History
In 1953, the brothers opened their own private hospital, Doctors Hospital, which was located at 320-340 College Street at Brunswick Avenue. The brothers modernized and expanded the facility so that it could accommodate up to 168 beds by 1955. It soon became the largest privately-held non-profit hospital in North America. By the time the brothers sold it during the late 1970s, it had 554 full-time staff and 500 hospital beds.
Category
Organization
Medical
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 2; File 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
2
File
27
Material Format
textual record
Date
1978
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of speeches, programme and correspondence relating to meeting held 16 May 1978.
Notes
Title based on contents of the file.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9; Series 2; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Annual meeting proceedings series
Level
File
Fonds
9
Series
2
File
28
Material Format
textual record
Date
1979
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of proceedings, invitation, programme and speeches relating to meeting held 29 April 1979. File also contains a list of citizenship certificate recipients.
Notes
Title based on contents of the file.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
Jul. 1991
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rabbi Shemen
Number
OH 284
Subject
Salsberg, J. B. (Joseph B.), ca. 1903-1998
Interview Date
Jul. 1991
Quantity
1
AccessionNumber
2004-1-4
Total Running Time
60 min or less
Biography
Rabbi Nachman Shemen was a talmudic scholar, journalist, scholar, teacher, “mediator par excellence,” and the author of more than twenty books. His contribution to Jewish scholarship included interpretations on biblical, talmudic, rabbinic, and literary studies. The two volumes, published in Tel Aviv in Yiddish, discuss issues that date back to the creation and the Book of Genesis up to more recent current day controversial issues as conversion and assimilation.
The rabbinic scholar was born in Chodel, Poland, a small town near Lublin, just before the outbreak of the First World War. Shemen's great-grandfather was a disciple of the founder of Hasidism in Poland, the “Seer of Lublin.” Both his parents were descendants of chassidism and scholars. When he was just over seventeen years old, he received rabbinic ordination, and In 1930, moved to Canada with his family.
A founder of COR the Kashruth supervisory body, Shemen made COR one of the largest and most respected kosher organizations in North America. For over 40 years, Shemen served as director of the Kashruth Council and Rabbinical Vaad Hakashruth of the Canadian Jewish Congress and the Toronto Jewish Congress. He was one of the founders of Congregation Torah V’Avoda and was associated with the Eitz Chaim Schools where he taught for over 25 years. He was a longtime contributor to Yiddish newspapers and wrote many articles, sometimes using the pseudonym “A Reporter,” on Jewish issues and about the early Jewish community of Toronto. He died in 1993.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
Name Access
Shemen, Nachman
Original Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Passenger Names
Wistosky, Myer, Manye & Burech
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Wistosky, Myer, Manye & Burech
Page Number
214
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Name
Mina Sprachman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
12 Dec. 1978
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Mina Sprachman
Number
OH 142
Subject
Architects
Buildings
Occupations
Interview Date
12 Dec. 1978
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
AC142: 31:34 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Abraham Sprachman (1896–1971) was as Toronto-based architect who, in partnership with Harold Kaplan in the firm Kaplan & Sprachman, was well-known for the design of art deco and art moderne movie theatres during the 1930s and 1940s and for designing buildings for Jewish communities across Canada from the 1930s to 1960s.
Abraham married his cousin Mina Sprachman in 1921. They had two children, Mandel and Sheila. Mandel followed in his father's footsteps and became a nationally-recognized and acclaimed architect. Both specialized in theatre design and renovations. Mandel became an architect best known for his restoration of the Elgin Wintergarden.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplan & Sprachman
Kaplan, Harold
Sprachman, Abraham, 1896-1971
Speisman, Stephen
Sprachman, Mina
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Mina Sprachman discusses her husband's architectural firm of Kaplan and Sprachman, its Jewish clientele and the firm's commissions to design and renovate theatres, hospitals and synagogues across Canada.

Name
Morris Shankman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 Jan. 1978
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Shankman
Number
OH 107
Subject
Immigrants
Businessmen
Interview Date
2 Jan. 1978
Quantity
2 cassettes (1 copy)
2 WAV files
Interviewer
Miriam Beckerman
Total Running Time
31.08 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003 Digitized 2014
Notes
Most of the interview is inaudible due to the nature of Mr. Shankman's voice. Morris is aged ninety-three at the time of interview.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Shankman was born in a small village near Minsk, Belarus. He immigrated to New York in 1904 and later to Toronto, where he got married and started his own business.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Geographic Access
Russia
Toronto (Ont.)
Belarus
New York (N.Y.).
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 107 - Shankman\OH107_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brynie Lacob and Steven Silver
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
31 Aug. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brynie Lacob and Steven Silver
Number
OH 437
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
31 Aug. 2016
Interviewer
Miriam Borden
Total Running Time
AC 437 part 1: 22 min.
AC 437 part 2: 22 min.
AC 437 part 3: 3 min.
Use Restrictions
Please contact Brynie Lacob for permission before posting on the internet.
Please contact Steven Silver for permission before posting on the internet.
Biography
Brynie and Steven first met at a bar mitzvah when Brynie was twelve and Steven was thirteen. The two have been in each other’s lives in one way or another ever since.
Brynie came to Canada in 1988. She chose Canada partly because she had a boyfriend there and partly because she anticipated using it as a stepping stone to the United States. Instead, she found work, earned a master’s degree in psychology, and married. Her first marriage resulted in three children, all of whom she enrolled in Jewish day school.
Steven came to Canada in 1994, a number of years after the rest of his immediate family had immigrated. He became involved in Canada’s film and television industry and today is chief executive officer of Kew Media Group, a special purpose acquisition company. In April 2000, Brynie and Steven began dating. They married in 2006.
Brynie and Steven retain close ties to South Africa, frequently going back. While both are grateful to Canada for the opportunities it has given them, they continue to feel a strong connection to the smells, sounds, and warmth of their country of origin and have discussed returning for a few months each year.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Lacob, Brynie
Silver, Steven
Geographic Access
Durban (South Africa)
Johannesburg (Ont.)
Thornhill (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:42 Brynie discusses her family's immigration to South Africa. Her paternal grandparents and maternal great-grandparents came from Lithuania. Her maternal grandparents were born in South Africa.
01:24 Steven discusses his family history. His paternal grandfather and great-grandparents came from Poland. His paternal grandmother was born in South Africa. His maternal grandmother came from Russia.
03:59 Steven was born in Durban and grew up in Johannesburg from age four. He came to Canada in 1994.
04:11 Brynie was born and raised in Johannesburg. She came to Canada in 1988 at age twenty-one.
04:49 Brynie discusses her family's Jewish practice. Her father's family was traditional. Her mother's family was secular.
06:09 Steven discusses his family's Jewish practice. His paternal grandfather was gabbai at the main synagogue in Durban.
09:05 Brynie discusses her personal practice of Judaism.
10:24 Steven discusses his personal Jewish experience. He attended Jewish day school, belonged to the Habonim youth movement, and attended ulpan in Israel in 1981.
12:09 Steven explains how his Jewish education and involvement in Habonim influenced him and other Jews to get involved with politics in South Africa.
12:55 Brynie discusses her family's involvement in politics. She explains that her mother was involved with the Progressive Reform Party (PRP). Brynie was not actively involved with politics.
14:45 Brynie explains her desire to leave South Africa. At age seventeen, she attended an exchange program for a year in the United States.
15:12 Steven discusses politics in his home and school life. He recalls an accident involving bringing a political activist to his school that left an impression on him.
16:53 Steven discusses his involvement with the National Union of South African Students while attending university. He was president in 1981.
17:30 Steven joined the African National Congress (ANC) when it was unbanned in 1990.
18:14 Steven discusses his involvement with the group End Conscription Campaign (ECC). He discusses getting arrested for his refusal to serve in the army.
20:18 Brynie discusses her relationship with her family's Black nanny.
21:26 Steven discusses his relationship with his family's Black nanny.
Part 2:
00:08 Brynie discusses the factors that led to her decision to leave South Africa.
01:10 Steven discusses his parents' and two young brothers' immigration to Canada in 1986. He explains his decision to remain in South Africa and the impetus that spurred him to leave in 1994.
02:43 Brynie describes her lack of preparedness upon arrival in Canada.
04:00 Brynie discusses her expectations of Canada when she arrived.
05:17 Steven explains the factors that facilitated his adjustment to Canada (e.g. family, employment).
07:28 Steven discusses his early impressions of Canada. He highlights the feelings of security and safety in Canada.
08:59 Brynie and Steven discuss how they met. Brynie was married previously and had three children. Steven and Brynie married in 2006.
12:15 Brynie discusses her children.
12:55 Brynie discusses her professional career in social work and counselling.
13:33 Steven discusses his professional career. He graduated in law. His career focused on documentary and feature films. He current works as chief executive officer of a media company.
15:40 Brynie discusses her reception in Canada.
17:17 Steven discusses his perceptions as a South African in Canada.
18:04 Brynie discusses her involvement in the Jewish community in Toronto.
19:08 Brynie shares her impressions of raising children in Toronto and more specifically in Thornhill.
20:21 Brynie discusses her ongoing connection with South Africa.
Part 3:
00:00 Steven discusses his ongoing to South Africa.
01:05 Steven shares some comments on the current and future situation in South Africa.
01:51 Brynie discusses her outgoing interest in South African news and politics.
Source
Oral Histories

Political Activism

The Place I Call Home

Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
JIAS National Office sous-fonds
National Executive meeting minutes series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 9-1; Series 1; File 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
JIAS National Office sous-fonds
National Executive meeting minutes series
Level
File
Fonds
9-1
Series
1
File
14
Material Format
textual record
Date
1964
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Ida Weisteld
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
10 Jul. 1977
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ida Weisteld
Number
OH 23
Interview Date
10 Jul. 1977
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Doris Newman
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Digitized 2014
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ida Weisteld (née Gazer) was born in 1907 in Brantford, Ontario. Her father, Velvel Gazer, settled in Brantford in 1900. Ida attended King Edward Public School and Brantford Collegiate Institute. As a child, she attended Cheder and participated in a boys and girls social group. She took a business course and worked as a bookkeeper after high school. She was married in Toronto in 1933.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Weisteld, Ida
Gazer, Velvel
Geographic Access
Brantford, Ont.
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 23 - Weisteld\OH23_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1980
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fred Schaeffer
Number
OH 24
Subject
Communities
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Synagogues
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1980
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side 1: 31 minutes
Side 2: 9 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Fred Schaeffer's wife, Beverley, grew up in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Beverley's grandfather, Hyman Kaplan, emigrated from Vilna, Lithuania in 1907, and after a few years in New York, moved to Toronto. Shortly afterwards he became the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake in 1914.
In the 1920s the Jewish community in Kirkland Lake built a permanent synagogue, and acquired the aron kodesh of eastern European design, its lamps, railings, pews and reader’s desk, from the disbanded Ukrainishe Shul in Montreal. In the 1970s the Kirkland Lake Synagogue disbanded and Fred and Beverly Schaeffer acquired the aron kodesh, all of its furnishings, the ner tamid and the parochet. They generously donated these Jewish artifacts to Beth Tikvah Synagogue, Toronto, in 1988, in memory of Isadore Kaplan, father of Beverly Schaeffer and Erich Schaeffer, father of Fred Schaeffer.
Fred, married Beverley in Toronto. Like many children from Kirkland Lake, Beverley had moved to the city to attend university. Fred and Beverley are keen collectors of Canadian art. He is a retired civil engineer and a former chairman of the Canadian art historical committee at the AGO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Atkins (family)
Bucavetsky (family)
Cochrane (Ont.)
Etkins (family)
Mallins (family)
Purkiss (family)
Schaeffer, Fred
Geographic Access
Ansonville (Ont.)
Engelhart (Ont.)
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Krugerdorf (Ont.)
Ontario, Northern
Timmins (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 24 - Schaeffer\OH24_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 24 - Schaeffer\OH24_002_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer and Stephen Speisman discuss some of the earliest synagogues established in Northern Ontario.

In this clip, Fred Schaeffer relates colourful anecdotes about the first Jewish settler in the Swastika-Kirkland area, Roza Brown.

Name
Morris Fishman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
12 Jul. 1977
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Fishman
Number
OH 36
Subject
Antisemitism
Communities
Synagogues
Interview Date
12 Jul. 1977
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Richard Menkis
Total Running Time
Side 1 46 minutes Side 2 17 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Fishman was born on 29 September 1916 in New Jersey. His family moved to Welland, Ontario when he was an infant. He attended elementary and high school in Welland and completed two years at the University of Toronto. He worked in a family menswear business in Welland. Morris was actively involved in the Jewish community including participation in the Anshe Yosher Congregation, the Jewish Cultural Society, and the Jacob Goldblatt B'nai Brith Lodge. He was married and had two daughters.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Fishman, Morris
Geographic Access
Welland (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 36 - Fishman\OH36_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 36 - Fishman\OH36_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Fishman praises the efforts of the non-Jewish community in Welland, Ontario to support the building of a new synagogue following a fire that destroyed the old synagogue in 1954.

In this clip, Morris Fishman discusses the JOHob Goldblatt B’nai Brith Lodge in Welland, Ontario.

Name
Cyrus Coppel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 Jul. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Cyrus Coppel
Number
OH 61
OH 62
Subject
Communities
Families
Interview Date
21 Jul. 1976
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
061A: 46:22 minuets 061B: 45:27 minuets 062A: 45:55 minuets 062B: 28:58 minuets
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Cassette tapes were digitized in 2012
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Cyrus Coppel, son of Aaron Coppel and Chaya (Gertrude) Seigel, was born in 1911 in Galt, Ontario. Cyrus remained in Galt throughout his life and became a central figure within its Jewish community. Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic and later worked in the office of an auto shop trading in auto parts. Cyrus also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus Coppel was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Coppel, Cyrus
Troster, Larry
B'nai Israel Synagogue (Galt, Ont.)
Geographic Access
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 61, OH 62 - Coppel\OH61_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 61, OH 62 - Coppel\OH61_002_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 61, OH 62 - Coppel\OH62_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 61, OH 62 - Coppel\OH62_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Cyrus Coppel discusses the growth of Galt's Jewish community following the Second World War and the need to purchase a new and larger synagogue to OHcommodate the growing population.

In this clip, Cyrus Coppel discusses the difficulties of raising Jewish children in a small town.

Name
Montague Raisman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Montague Raisman
Number
OH 64
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Human rights
Antisemitism
World War, 1939-1945
Zionism
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
39:42 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Low sound volume
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Montague Raisman came to Canada from England in 1926. He was actively involved in B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge and held positions of office. He served as the commanding officer for the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto during the Second World War. He was instrumental in the formation of the Joint Public Relations Committee, a united Jewish voice in response to pro-Nazi activity.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Raisman, Montague
B'nai Brith
Lipinsky, Jack
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Calgary (Alta.)
Montréal (Québec)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 64 - Raisman\OH64_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Montague describes the formation of the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron during the Second World War. He discusses the recruitment and training of the officers and cadets. He explains how this squadron was instrumental in changing recruitment qualifications to allow entry of new immigrants and black cadets.

In this clip, Montague Raisman discusses the events leading up to an association between B

Name
John Furedi
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
John Furedi
Number
OH 78
OH 79
Subject
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Immigrants--Canada
Farmers
Communities
Synagogues
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Quantity
4 cassettes (2 copies)
3 WAV files
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
OH78_001: 45.20 minutes OH78_002: 45.30 minutes
Conservation
Copied to cassette in August 2003
Copied to digital file in December 2013
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
John Furedi was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1925. During the Second World War, John was drafted into the Hungarian Labour Service System (Munkaszolgalat). After the Nazi occupation of Hungary in March 1944, John was deported to the Kistarcsa transit camp. Between 1945 and 1948, John travelled throughout Europe and returned to Budapest during the takeover of Hungary by the Communists. The revolution and anti-Jewish sentiment forced many Jews, including John and his wife Stephanie, to flee Hungary. In 1956, they immigrated to Canada and lived in Montreal for one year. In 1958, with the aid of a six-thousand-dollar loan provided by the Jewish Colonization Association, John became the first Jewish chicken farmer to settle in Beamsville, Ontario. John went on to become an active member of Beamsville's Jewish community and participated in the establishment of the community’s first congregation in 1966.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Furedi, John
Jewish Colonization Association
Geographic Access
Beamsville (Ont.)
Hungary
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 78 - Furedi\OH78_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 78 - Furedi\OH78_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Paul Szasz
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Paul Szasz
Number
OH 80
OH 81
Subject
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Concentration camps
Communism
Farmers
Communities
Synagogues
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Quantity
4 cassettes (2 copies)
2 WAV files
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
OH80_001: 45.29 minutes OH80_002: 44.23 minutes OH81: 44.20 minutes
Conservation
OH 080 and 081 were both damaged (tape snapped). They were sent out and were repaired and digitized in 2014.
Copied to cassette in August 2003
Digitzed in June 2014
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Paul Szasz was born in 1926 in Tiszakeszi, Hungary, and was a Holocaust survivor. He came from a family of traditonal farmers. During the Second World War, he was drafted into the Hungarian Labor Service System (Munkaszolgalat) and was liberated from Auschwitz in 1945. Paul escaped Hungary during the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 and immigrated to Canada. With the aid of a loan from the Jewish Colonization Association, Paul purchased a farm in Beamsville, Ontario. Paul went on to become an active member of Beamsville's Jewish community and particpated in the establishment of the community's first congregation in 1966.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Geographic Access
Beamsville (Ont.)
Hungary
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 80, OH 81 - Szasz\OH80_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 80, OH 81 - Szasz\OH80_002_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 80, OH 81 - Szasz\OH81_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
22 Jul. 1971
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ida Siegel
Number
OH 166
OH 167
Subject
Charities
Women
Interview Date
22 Jul. 1971
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Eva Kayfetz
Total Running Time
OH166A: 47.minutes OH166B: 5. minutes OH167A: 29. minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contOHt the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ida Siegel (née Lewis) (1885-1982) was born 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established The Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to Board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Hadassah-WIZO of Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Ida Siegel discusses the formation of Hadassah in Canada and how it evolved into Hadassah-WIZO. She describes the creation of separate Hadassah branches.

In this clip, Ida Siegel explains the events that led up to the formation of a committee that she headed to write a Constitution for Hadassah. She describes some of the struggles she encountered in the process.

Name
Irving Milchberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
26 Jul. 2007
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Irving Milchberg
Number
OH 333
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Holocaust survivors
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
26 Jul. 2007
Quantity
1 mini DV ; 1 archival DVD ; 1 reference DVD
Interviewer
Sharon Gubbay Helfer
Total Running Time
1 hr
Notes
Part of Ontario Small Jewish Communities Project.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Irving Milchberg, the Holocaust survivor known from Joseph Ziemian's book The Cigarette Sellers of Three Crosses Square, used to sell cigarettes to Nazis in Warsaw as an oprhan during the Second World War.
Milchberg, leader of a group of orphaned Jewish children hiding their identities, used to gather at Three Crosses Square, the centre of the German occupation of Warsaw, to sell cigarettes. They went wandering around under the very noses of policemen, gendarmes, Gestapo men, and ordinary spies.
Before joining the cigarette sellers, Milchberg twice escaped from the Nazis. The first time he scaled a fence and fled the Umschlagplatz, where Jews were put aboard trains to the Treblinka death camp. The second time, he managed to break the bars of the train taking him to Treblinka and scramble out. His father, mother, and three sisters were all murdered by the Nazis.
In 1945, Milchberg made his way to Czechoslovakia, then Austria, then to a camp for displaced people in occupied Germany, where he learned watchmaking, his lifelong occupation. In 1947 he moved to Canada, ending up in Niagara Falls, where he opened his own jewellery and watch business. In 1953 he met his wife, Renee, who had survived the war. They had two children and three grandchildren. Milchberg died in January 2014 at the age of eighty-six.
Material Format
moving images
Geographic Access
Niagara Falls, Ont.
Original Format
Mini DV
Copy Format
DVD
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Laurie Manoim
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
16 Jul. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Laurie Manoim
Number
OH 424
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
16 Jul. 2015
Interviewer
Gail Freeman
Total Running Time
OH 424 part 1: 40 min.
OH 424 part 2: 9 min.
Biography
Lorraine “Laurie” Manoim (née Stern) was born on 21 June 1945 in Johannesburg, South Africa. She spent a happy childhood growing up with her two brothers and many cousins. Her parents were founding members of Temple Emanuel, a Reform synagogue.
Laurie’s family is a rich tapestry of nationalities. Her paternal grandparents were from Austria and Germany; her maternal grandfather was from Morocco; her maternal grandmother was from Poland; and her mother was born in Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia). In addition, Laurie is a descendant of Solica Hachuel, a Moroccan-Jewish martyr who was killed in the early nineteenth century. This background made Laurie’s family stand out from other Jewish families in South Africa, many of whom originally emigrated from Lithuania.
After earning her bachelor of arts, Laurie married and had a son, Gary. She and her husband opened a restaurant, which Laurie ran by herself for the first two years, but ended up divorcing. Not wanting her son to internalize the values of apartheid South Africa, Laurie made the decision to immigrate to Canada with her son.
Laurie and Gary arrived in Canada in 1978. Laurie managed to raise Gary without family support and while holding down multiple jobs. She worked in the restaurant industry for a number of years, even owning a deli at one point, but ultimately decided to go back to school, earning a master’s degree in industrial relations (MIR). After graduating, she worked at the Government of Canada for twenty-eight years. During this time her parents immigrated to Canada and she supported them by having the additional income from students residing in her home for fifteen years. Laurie graduated from Guelph as a master gardener. (Gardening is her major hobby.)
Laurie has a large and diverse social circle and a broad range of interests. She has been back to South Africa many times as her son returned to work there for twenty years before returning to Canada. She has no desire to move back, commenting that she couldn’t go back to an empty life, to being a prisoner of luxury and discrimination.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Manoim, Laurie, 1945-
Geographic Access
Bulawayo (Zimbabwe)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Laurie's maiden name was Stern. She was born on 21 June 1945 in Johannesburg. She immigrated to Canada in 1978.
00:55 Laurie's paternal grandparents came from Germany and Austria. Her father was born in South Africa. Her maternal grandfather came from Morocco. Her maternal grandmother came from Poland. Her mother was born in Rhodesia.
01:19 Laurie discusses how her maternal grandfather from Morocco came to Bulawayo in Rhodesia.
02:20 Laurie discusses her childhood. She had two brothers. One brother died at age twenty-two. Her younger brother is married and lives in South Africa.
03:18 Laurie discusses her family's religious observance. Her father came from a small farming town, Schweizer-Reneke. Her parents were founding members of Temple Emanuel, a Reform synagogue.
04:50 Laurie outlines her education: elementary grades at Rosebank (a public school), secondary grades at King David (a Jewish day school).
06:22 Laurie earned a bachelor of arts in sociology and economics at university. She studied computers and market research.
07:53 Laurie got engaged and married. In 1970, she and her husband decided to immigrate. Laurie discusses some of their reasons and their plan. They ran a restaurant to get a cash business.
09:07 Laurie discusses the breakdown of her marriage that ended in divorce. She needed to get court's permission to bring her son with her to Canada.
10:06 Laurie explains her decision to immigrate to Canada.
11:00 Laurie describes her disappointment when her son, Gary, returned to South Africa.
12:38 Laurie considered and abandoned the options of living in Israel and San Francisco.
13:35 Laurie describes her struggles with finding suitable housing, finding stable employment, and raising her young son during her early years in Canada.
17:57 Laurie mentions preparation for her son's bar mitzvah.
18:50 Laurie returned to university to earn a master's degree in industrial relations. She found a government post, where she remained for twenty-six years.
20:30 Laurie shares some of her initial impressions of living in Canada. She compares and contrasts the Jewish communities in South Africa and Toronto, and specifically highlights how the needs of the South African Jewish immigrants differed from other Jewish immigrant groups.
24:43 Laurie identifies some of the challenges she faced when she came to Toronto.
25:34 Laurie describes the circumstances that triggered her parents' immigration to Canada in 1996.
27:04 Laurie describes her mother's artistic training and endeavours.
28:53 Laurie discusses some of the South African traditions she has maintained while living in Canada.
31:06 Laurie rediscovered seven South African childhood friends in Canada, but most of her friends are Canadian.
32:13 Laurie describes her passion for gardening.
34:05 Laurie identifies an incident when she first felt Canadian. She describes how her family in South Africa became dispersed.
35:17 Laurie shares an anecdote about one of her Moroccan ancestors.
37:33 Laurie shares memories of her move to Canada.
Part 2:
00:20 Laurie explains how she was able to secure housing at Bayview Mews after some initial challenges.
03:00 Laurie offers tribute to her work colleagues and gives some examples to justify her admiration.
06:05 Laurie speaks of her relationship with a friend during her life and during her terminal illness.
08:24 Laurie discusses her travel plans for retirement.
Source
Oral Histories

Immigrating Solo to Canada

Name
Karrie Weinstock
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Karrie Weinstock
Number
OH 435
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 435 part 1: 22 min.
OH 435 part 2: 11 min.
OH 435 part 3: 22 min.
OH 435 part 4: 5 min.
Biography
Karrie’s life has long been characterized by both privilege and an acute sensitivity to the challenges facing those less fortunate than herself. Although she grew up in a happy professional family, her childhood was marked by uncertainty. Her father, Jack Unterhalter, was a civil rights lawyer in the Apartheid era, active in left-wing politics, and Karrie recalls him keeping a packed briefcase by the door during the state of emergency in case the authorities should come for him.
As a young woman, Karrie studied to be an English teacher at Homerton College, Cambridge. She then returned to South Africa, where she taught for two years, before moving to Boston to pursue a master’s degree in educational administration, planning and social policy at Harvard. Upon graduating, she took a position at Milton OHademy, an independent school in Boston. She enjoyed her time there but chose to relocate to Toronto, where she had an aunt. For over three decades, she has worked at Branksome Hall, first as an English teacher, then as an administrator, and now in her current role as deputy principal.
In 1985, Karrie married Michael Weinstock, a native Torontonian, whose family embraced her as one of their own. Both Karrie and Michael had been married previously and through her marriage to Michael, she inherited three beautiful stepdaughters. Karrie and Michael had a child of their own, a son who shares his mother’s love of South Africa, visiting the country each year.
Recognizing her great fortune in life, Karrie gives back through her volunteer work with the Stephen Leacock Foundation, which, among other initiatives, supports low-fee independent schools in South Africa that are connected to independent and public schools in Canada so as to form a unique Triangle of Hope.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Weinstock, Karen
Geographic Access
Boston (Mass.)
Cambridge (England)
Jamestown (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Karrie outlines her immediate family. She was born in Johannesburg, South Africa.
01:28 Karrie discusses her family history. Her maternal grandfather was born in 1891 in Lithuania. He came to South Africa in 1914 to escape the military. Her maternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Lithuania. Her paternal grandfather was born in 1888 in Poland. Her paternal grandmother, whose parents came from Lithuania, was born in London in 1893.
03:54 Karrie discusses her father's career as a civil rights lawyer. She discusses her father's role as a founding member of the Liberal Party in South Africa.
06:35 Karrie discusses the impOHt her father's political OHtivism had on her family. She offers examples to illustrate the unique situation in her home while growing up (e.g. political meetings, fear of her father's imminent arrest, visits from political prisoners).
08:26 Karrie offers her impressions of the position taken by the greater Jewish community in South Africa.
09:27 Karrie explains why she and her siblings attended independent schools.
11:00 Karrie discusses her family's involvement in the Jewish community and Jewish prOHtice.
13:15 Karrie discusses how her parents stressed the importance of education and viewed education as a means of leaving South Africa. She discusses the education paths of her siblings as well as her own. Karrie received her teaching qualifications at Cambridge and earned a master's degree in administration planning and social policy at Harvard.
15:34 Karrie lives in Canada. Her sister lives in London. Her brother opted to return to South Africa.
16:38 Karrie relates an anecdote that compares her current situation of seeing her mother once a year with Black workers in South Africa who saw their children once a year.
17:48 Karrie explains that both her sister and brother were unable to return to South Africa for a period of time. In her sister's case it was due to her political activity; in her brother's case, it was due to his refusal to serve in the military.
18:55 Karrie discusses her "charmed" life growing up.
20:54 Karrie discusses her teaching qualifications and first teaching position at an independent school for mixed-race students.
Part 2:
00:56 Karrie discusses her experience at Harvard. Specifically, she mentions a friendship.
06:09 Karrie explains why her parents preferred that she not return to South Africa.
07:09 Karrie relates the story of finding a job at Milton Academy in Boston following graduation.
Part 3:
00:00 Karrie explains how she decided to move to Toronto.
03:45 Karrie explains how she became engaged and married to Clive Lovett in 1979. She explains the factors that contributed to the end of their four-year marriage.
05:16 Karrie discusses her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Branksome Hall.
12:59 Karrie describes meeting and marrying Michael Weinstock. Michael has three children from a previous marriage. Karrie and Michael have one son together.
15:20 Karrie explains how Peter Oliver, a prominent South African-born Toronto philanthropist and businessman, arranged to fund and build an independent school, the Get-Ahead Project School in rural South Africa. She explains her involvement with the project and the connection with Branksome Hall, Rose Avenue Public School, a high-needs school in Toronto, and the Get-Ahead Project School in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Karrie continues to describe the inter-school program that has been set up for students at Branksome Hall, a school in Jamestown; Toronto, and the Get-Ahead school.
02:26 Karrie discusses her role on the board of the Leacock Foundation and her opportunity to further the inter-school program. She cites an example of how they contributed to the Get-Ahead school.
04:17 Karrie reminisces about times when she felt Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

A Triangle of Hope

A Packed Suitcase by the Door

A Charmed Existence

Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1890]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Abe Myers and Lena Simon of Brantford, Ontario.
Notes
Original photograph by Park & Co., 124-26 Colborne St., Brantford.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 935
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
935
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1903
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Mr. and Mrs. Myer Shear of Seaforth, Ontario with their children. The small boy pictured next to Mrs. Shear is George Shear.
Notes
Photo by Jackson Bros.
Name Access
Shear, Myer
Shear, George
Subjects
Families
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Seaforth (Ont.)
Accession Number
1976-7-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 522
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
522
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of David Papernick, age 85, reading outside at 31 Henry St.
Notes
No negative.
Name Access
Papernick, David
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Henry Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
Acquired 22 June 1975.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Dr. Hana Gelber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1973
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Hana Gelber
Number
OH 13
OH 14
Subject
Antisemitism
Families
Occupations
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1973
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
013 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side Two 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Hana Gelber (née David) was born in Safed (Tzfat), Palestine in 1907. She studied sciences at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and prepared her thesis at Hebrew University. She graduated from University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1929. Hana moved to Toronto in December 1929 and married Eddie Gelber in March 1930. Hana and Eddie moved to New York where Eddie was completing his final year at the Jewish Theological Seminary and Hana conducted research at the Rockefeller Institute. They returned to Toronto in July 1930. Hana graduated from Medical School at the University of Toronto in 1934. She completed her medical internship in Palestine. Hana and Eddie lived in Palestine from 1934 to 1939. They returned to Toronto in 1939 where they remained until 1954 at which time they made aliyah. Hana worked at Women's College Hospital until 1954. Hana had three children: Edna, Lynn, and David.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Gelber, Hana
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Women's College Hospital (Toronto, Ont.)
Geographic Access
New York (N.Y.).
Palestine
Toronto (Ont.)
Tsefat (Israel)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH13_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH14_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH14_002_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brenda and Colin Baskind
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
16 Jul. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Brenda and Colin Baskind
Number
OH 423
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
16 Jul. 2015
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
1 hr. 52 min.
Biography
Brenda met Colin on a blind date while attending teacher’s college in Johannesburg. The two dated for one year before getting married at the Pine Street Shul in 1967. Together, they raised three children—Stacey, Alana, and Cliff—and helped bring up the nephew of their maid, whom they regarded as family.
Around 1976, Colin and Brenda began thinking about emigrating as a result of the country’s worsening political situation. At first, their daughter was unwilling to move, but after a riot broke out at her university, she declared she had had enough. Initially, the family considered moving to Australia, but soon settled upon Canada, immigrating in 1987. Although they found the prospect of starting over intimidating, they received a warm welcome from both the South African Jewish community and the larger community.
Brenda and Colin purchased a khaloupe (a fixer-upper) that they transformed into a beautiful home, planting trees in its large garden. Brenda found employment with Holy Blossom Synagogue while Colin became president of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada. In their free time, they took up running, a hobby that introduced them to many friends. By 2015, they had participated in eleven marathons.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Yiddish
Name Access
Baskind, Brenda, 1944-
Baskind, Colin, 1941-
Geographic Access
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Port Elizabeth (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:13 Brenda (née Bebrow?) was born 29 October 1944 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. Brenda discusses her parents’ divorce and the death of her brother from polio in 1956.
01:25 Brenda explains the reasons her mother sent her to boarding school in Grahamstown.
02:12 Brenda’s father drowned in the ocean in Port Elizabeth at age eleven.
03:41 Brenda’s mother worked as a bookkeeper in Johannesburg.
03:50 Brenda discusses her limited Jewish education and practice while living in Grahamstown.
05:40 Brenda reminisces about her experience at boarding school.
06:43 Brenda discusses how she was able to cope while dealing with her parents’ divorce, followed by the deaths of her brother, father, and grandmother.
07:36 Brenda’s maternal grandparents and great-grandmother were from Russia. They were observant Jews.
09:12 Brenda moved to Johannesburg at age eighteen to attend teacher’s college. She describes living with her great-aunt, great-uncle, and cousin.
10:21 Brenda describes how she met her husband, Colin.
11:37 Colin was born on 20 April 1941 in Johannesburg, South Africa. He lived with his parents and younger sister.
12:03 Colin reminisces about his early years. He discusses his friends and interest in sports.
13:50 Colin’s father was a butcher. His mother assisted his father.
14:18 Colin discusses the high quality of his education.
15:32 Colin’s father practiced Orthodox Judaism.
16:26 Colin discusses his Jewish education. He reminisces about his bar mitzvah.
18:43 Colin describes how he helped with his father’s business.
20:21 Colin’s father was born in Lithuania at age 11. His mother was born in Latvia. Both came to South Africa in the 1920s.
21:39 Colin attended university in Johannesburg.
23:21 Colin discusses work experience.
25:12 Colin and Brenda reminisce about their initial meeting, courtship, and marriage.
29:30 Colin and Brenda’s eldest daughter Alana was born.
29:36 Colin and Brenda discuss their close relationship with their nanny and her family. They describe the living conditions for nannies in general.
33:23 Colin and Brenda recount how they helped raise the baby of their nanny’s sister.
36:50 Brenda’s mother remarried a third time.
39:18 Brenda discusses her work as a nursery school teacher in Johannesburg and Toronto.
41:06 Colin and Brenda explain the reasons that triggered their decision to emigrate. They describe the Soweto riots in 1976.
45:08 Colin explains how they chose and were accepted to immigrate to Canada. Colin and Brenda discuss the distinct advantages of living in Canada relative to South Africa and Australia.
52:33 Colin only considered leaving South Africa after his parents passed away.
53:10 Colin and Brenda discuss their children’s points of view about leaving South Africa.
55:23 Colin and Brenda describe how they got ready for the move to Canada. They discuss what they were and were not allowed to bring out of South Africa.
57:27 Colin explains how some South Africans left the country without going through the steps of formal immigration.
57:26 Brenda describes her fears concerning the move and explains the reasons some of her friends have remained in South Africa.
1:00:04 Brenda shares early memories of moving to Toronto: buying a house and a car.
1:03:09 Colin and Brenda contrast the quality of living between Johannesburg and Toronto.
1:05:04 Colin and Brenda discuss how they formed their early social connections.
1:07:46 Colin discusses how he maintained interest in sport, both as a participant and as a spectator. Sport was another means of making friends.
1:10:0 Colin volunteered with the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (JIAS) for five years and became involved with the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC).
1:10:40 Colin discusses his involvement with SAJAC.
1:12:44 Brenda and Colin discuss some of the language and cultural challenges they encountered when they arrived in Canada.
1:16:17 Colin and Brenda discuss the achievements of their children.
1:20:42 Colin and Brenda discuss their daughter Stacy’s decision to be a single mother. Brenda discusses their involvement with baby Lily’s care and their decision to buy a house with private quarters to share with Stacy and Lily.
1:28:18 Brenda discusses two trips back to South Africa to care for her mother in 1998.
1:32:28 Brenda discusses the changes she noted in South Africa during her visit.
1:34:43 Colin discusses his volunteer work with JIAS, SAJAC, Jewish Family & Child (JF&CS) and JVC. He explains his desire to enable others to prepare themselves for and find work.
1:43:33 Colin discusses some of the challenges faced by his sister.
1:46:50 Colin and Brenda share their views on the current and future situation in South Africa.
Source
Oral Histories

The Way Things Were

A khaloupe!

A Scholarship Based on Need

Name
Avis and Robbie Osher
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
12 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Avis and Robbie Osher
Number
OH 436
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
12 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 436 part 1: 12 min.
OH 436 part 2: 11 min.
OH 436 part 3: 22 min.
OH 436 part 4: 13 min.
Biography
Like many South Africans, Avis and Robbie are descendants of Latvian and Lithuanian immigrants to South Africa. Each had two siblings, attended public school, and went on to attend Wits University. Avis became an occupational therapist and Robbie a chartered accountant. They have three daughters.
Avis and Robbie began thinking about leaving South Africa as early as 1969, but a combination of family and financial considerations kept them there until 1996, the year they immigrated to Canada.
Robbie ran a successful accounting practice in South Africa for thirty years. On arriving in Canada, he decided he wanted a career change and eventually transitioned into the role of chief financial officer of a Toronto company. A competitive squash player in South Africa, he continued winning titles at the provincial and national levels in Canada. It was largely through squash that he integrated into Canadian society.
Avis worked in a variety of hospitals and schools, taught at Wits, and ran a successful practice in Johannesburg. She re-qualified to register in Canada and after occupying different positions now works in her own practice.
They are proud grandparents of nine grandchildren. They both agree that through their professional and personal dedication, they have given back to their adopted country.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Osher, Avis
Osher, Robbie, 1939-
Geographic Access
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:14 Avis was born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Avis provides a brief family history. Her mother, Rae Mer, was born in Zamel, Lithuania. Her father, Sollie Burde, was born in Grodno, Belarus. She discusses the circumstances of various relatives.
01:45 Avis explains why her father came to South Africa in 1932.
02:55 Avis hypothesizes how her parents met and married in Johannesburg. Avis had one sister, Hessie, and one brother, David.
04:25 Avis describes her experience growing up.
06:38 Avis explains that she went to work in the family factory when she finished school. She discusses her mother's role in the business.
07:44 Avis discusses her family's involvement with the Jewish community and their practice of Judaism.
10:50 Avis describes the path she took to become an occupational therapist. She describes her first work placement.
Part 2:
00:00 Robbie was named Robert Percy Osher at birth. Robbie was born in Johannesburg in 1939.
01:02 Robbie discusses his childhood. He discusses his social life, interests, and education. Robbie graduated from accounting and qualified as a certified public accountant (CPA) in Israel. He received a degree in accounting in the United Kingdom and a certified management accountant (CMA) degree.
04:01 Robbie discusses the reasons for considering and then rejecting the idea of moving to Israel in 1969. Robbie discusses his Jewish education and his family's practice of Judaism.
05:34 Robbie provides a brief family history. His mother was born in 1912 in Latvia. She came to South Africa at age eight with her family. His father was born in 1911 in ?Killem, Lithuania. His father was a tailor.
07:40 Robbie explains that his family had Black servants. He discusses segregation.
Robbie discusses his reasons for deciding to leave South Africa in 1969. He discusses multiple applications for emigration: Canada, the United States, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Israel. Their daughter, Dorit, immigrated to Canada in 1986. Robbie explains how he and Avis immigrated to Canada in 1990 after settling their business affairs.
Part 3:
00:17 Avis discusses the dilemmas she struggled with when she and Robbie considered leaving South Africa.
01:35 Avis describes the challenges her family encountered when they attempted a move to the United States in 1976.
03:50 Avis describes her response when her mother suffered a heart attack when Avis was aged eight. She explains how she was not inclined to leave her mother.
05:17 Avis discusses expectations for her daughters.
05:49 Robbie discusses the reasons for remaining in South Africa.
08:00 Robbie discusses his passion for and achievement in squash, including six medals at the Maccabiah Games in 1985, 1989, and 1993.
10:50 Robbie explains how playing competitive squash in Canada was a way of integrating into Canadian society. Robbie discusses his accomplishments in squash since he arrived in Canada.
12:03 Robbie discusses his work since he arrived in Canada.
12:50 Avis explains how they were able to get some money out of South Africa despite state financial restrictions.
15:00 Avis shares some stories from her experience working with Black African patients and staff. She discusses hierarchies and inequities in care and equipment.
18:33 Avis and Robbie provide examples to show racism and the separation of white, Black, and coloured individuals in South Africa.
21:20 Robbie relates an example from his own experience to highlight the practice of racism and injustice in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Avis discusses her relationship with their family nanny.
02:30 Robbie describes what they brought with them from South Africa to Canada.
04:30 Robbie and Avis discuss the reaction of their friends and relationships when they decided to leave.
08:26 Avis discuss the life pursuits of their three daughters: Dorit, Shira, and Susan.
11:05 Robbie and Avis discuss factors that contribute to their feeling and identifying as Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

Overcrowding in Black Hospitals

What We Left Behind

An Icon at the Club

Address
151 Palmerston Avenue
Source
Landmarks

Congregation Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard was established in 1914 and services were first held in a house. In 1924, a building was erected at 151 Palmerston Ave. It was one of the first congregations built west of Spadina Ave. It was a thriving shul until the community began to move North in the 1950s. They decided to close their doors in 1978 and the building was subsequently destroyed the following year.
Address
151 Palmerston Avenue
Time Period
1914-1978
Scope Note
Congregation Agudath Israel Anshei Sfard was established in 1914 and services were first held in a house. In 1924, a building was erected at 151 Palmerston Ave. It was one of the first congregations built west of Spadina Ave. It was a thriving shul until the community began to move North in the 1950s. They decided to close their doors in 1978 and the building was subsequently destroyed the following year.
Category
Architecture
Religious
Source
Landmarks
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 22; Item 135
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Morris Norman collection
Level
Item
Fonds
22
Item
135
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1928]
Physical Description
1 item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3550
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3550
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1926?]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 6 x 8 cm
Scope and Content
Myer Bochner (1878-1968?) immigrated from Austria in 1900. He and his wife Mollie (or Malka?) (b. 1881) lived at 90 Gordon Street in Guelph. They had five children: Thomas (b. 1900); Rosie (1904-1978); Henery (b. 1906); Minnie (or Mollie?) (b. 1908), and Bella (b.1910).
Name Access
Bochner, Meyer
Bochner, Malka
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-4-8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 741
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
741
Material Format
textual record
Date
1974
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Rivka Hurwich and Sam Hurwich
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 Jul. 1974
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Rivka Hurwich and Sam Hurwich
Number
OH 22
Subject
Antisemitism
Hospitals
Rabbis
Schools
Teachers
Interview Date
2 Jul. 1974
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
Side One - 43 minutes
Side Two - 3 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003.
Digitized in 2014.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dr. Sam Hurwich was involved in a number of organzations including the Canadian Jewish Congress, JIAS, and several Labour Zionist groups.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Hospital for Sick Children
Hurwich, Rivka
Hurwich, Sam
Geographic Access
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 22 - Hurwich\OH22_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 22 - Hurwich\OH22_002_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1890]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy wedding photograph and corresponding negative of A. W. Myers and his wife Lena (née Simon) Myers. Their wedding was probably the first Jewish wedding in Brantford.
Subjects
Married people
Portraits
Weddings
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 117; Item 5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
117
Item
5
Material Format
textual record
Date
15 [April?] 1930
Physical Description
1 letter
Scope and Content
This item consists of two letters. One letter, written in Polish, is addressed to Bella from her brother David in Poland. This letter has been translated in hand-written and typed versions. On the reverse side is a letter in Yiddish from David addressed to Bella's brother Myer. This letter has not been translated.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Ivan Zarenda
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 Jul. 2011
15 Jun. 2012
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ivan Zarenda
Number
OH 434
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
21 Jul. 2011
15 Jun. 2012
Interviewer
Jessica Parker
Total Running Time
Part I: 46 min.
Part II: 1 hr. 4 min.
Biography
Ivan’s parents arrived in South Africa from Lithuania around 1930. Prior to immigrating, they knew each other from Klykoliai, a shtetl in northwestern Lithuania. Ivan’s father was the first to arrive, taking up work at a concession store in the mining town of Brakpan. As for Ivan’s mother, she came over with her mother after her siblings had prepared a home for them in Brakpan. After being sent to a convent in Rhodesia in order to learn English, she returned to Brakpan where she married Ivan’s father. Together, the couple raised two children, who grew up with their maternal grandmother, who only spoke Yiddish. Consequently, Ivan grew up speaking Yiddish as well as English. He even gave his bar mitzvah speech in Yiddish, causing his Lithuanian grandmother to beam with pride.
Although they were not well off, Ivan’s parents managed to send their two sons to university. As an undergraduate, Ivan studied pharmacy at Rhodes University in Grahamstown. He met his wife while visiting his parents in Kimberley, where they had moved and were managing a hotel. The two were introduced on a blind date and corresponded for well over a year when Ivan went to do a post-graduate degree in industrial pharmacy at the University of Michigan. When Ivan returned to South Africa to take up a job in Cape Town, the two dated, became engaged, and married. In 1990, they immigrated to Canada with their two children as part of a job transfer. After a short stay in Brockville, the family relocated to Kingston, where they were active in Jewish life. Ivan’s wife, Daphne, passed away in 2006. He moved from Kingston to Toronto in 2018, joining his children Marc and Shelley and families who live there.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Zarenda, Ivan
Geographic Access
Kingston (Ont.)
South Africa
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

Friendship with Afrikaners

Level
Item
ID
Item 292
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
292
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1911
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 12 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Dr. Harry Myer Jolley and Mrs. Eva Jolefsky (nee Geller) as children.
Name Access
Berstein, Ida
Geller, Eva
Jolefsky, Eva
Jolley, Harry Myer
Subjects
Children
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 78; File 3; Item 48
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sadie Stren fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
78
File
3
Item
48
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[189-]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph of Mr. A. W. Myers, Mrs. Isaac Simon, and Mrs. A. W. Myers (née Lena Simon) of Alexandria, Ontario.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Alexandria (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-11-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 117; Item 3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Bella Diamant fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
117
Item
3
Material Format
textual record
Date
[1929 or 1930]
Physical Description
1 letter
Scope and Content
This item is a letter written in Polish to Bella and Bella's brother Myer from sisters Ruth and Esther and cousin Bela in Poland. It was written sometime during 1929 or 1930 Included are hand-written and typed translations.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 247
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
247
Material Format
textual record
Date
1997 - 1998
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 2; File 1294
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
General office subject and correspondence files series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
2
File
1294
Material Format
textual record
Date
1996
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Accession Number
2005-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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