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Accession Number
2017-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-4-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
599 photographs : b&w and col. (1 negative) ; 28 x 38 cm or smaller
10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1890]-1982
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 3 albums and loose photos related to Ida Siegel and extended family. Photos depict summer outings, family get togethers, and Ida Siegel's volunteer work. Also included are awards, publications relating to her charitable work, and condolences upon her passing. In addition there is a condolence scrapbook prepared by the Women's Auxiliary of Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care. One album is devoted solely to her daughter Sair Lee. Family names in photos include: Koffman, Rittenberg, Lewis, Kaufman, Labovitz, Kossin, Rubin, Curt, Sontag, Slatt (Turofsky), Hersh, Tickten, Jones, and Silver.
Administrative History
Ida Lewis Siegel (1885-1982) was instrumental in the founding and development of several prominent Jewish organizations, such as the Daughters of Zion, Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada, the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society and the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. She was also particularly active in the educational sector and in campaigning for the rights of female educators. She was internationally known for her devotion to Jewish learning and for her contributions to the development of the Toronto Jewish community. Ida was born to Samuel Lewis (b. 1859) and Hannah Ruth (Ticktin) Lewis (b. 1864) on 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was the first child to be born in the United States after her parents immigrated from Lithuania. She had two brothers, Abe Lewis (b. 1880) and Charles S. Lewis (b. 1883). She attended elementary school in Pittsburgh, and in 1894, she and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel at the Elm Street Synagogue. Isidore was a travelling peddler, and later, owner of a store in Cochrane, Ontario. Together, they had six children: Rohama Lee (1905-?), Leah Gittel (Labovitz) (1907-2004), David Isar (1909-2004), Sarah (Sontag) (1912-1942), Avrom Fichel (1916-2010), and Rivka Hadassah (Gurau) (1923-2001). Ida is credited with helping to found a large number of Jewish philanthropic and social organizations including the Daughters of Zion, the first ladies' Zionist society in Canada (1899); the Herzl Girls' Club (1904); Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada (1916); the Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Circle, which developed into the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society (1907); the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. (1919); the Women’s League of the United Synagogues of America in Toronto (192-); the Goel Tzedec Sunday School (1914); and the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood (192-). She was also named honorary president of the Beth Tzedec Sisterhood in 1953. With the help of her brother Abe, Ida formed the first free Jewish Dispensary in Toronto, located on Elizabeth Street in the Ward, which was the forerunner to the Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida also helped form a unified fundraising body for the Jewish community known as the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (1917), which would become the current UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. However, Ida was denied a seat on the executive after campaigning for a female representative. Always involved in the field of education, Ida was one of the original founders of the Home and School Association in 1919. In 1930, she became the first Jewish woman to be elected to the Toronto Board of Education, a post which she held for six years. She was later named honorary secretary of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education. In 1937, she ran unsuccessfully for alderman in Toronto, but remained politically active with the Association of Women's Electors. She was active in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom from 1915 onward and was an outspoken opponent of both world wars. Throughout her lifetime, Ida held the position of national vice-president of the Zionist Organization of Canada, sat on the executive board of the Canadian Jewish Congress and was a member of the Jewish Historical Society. Her religious affiliations were with Goel Tzedec, Beth Tzedec, Shaar Shomayim and the Beach Hebrew Institute.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Siegel, Ida Lewis, 1885-1982
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
22 Jul. 1971
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ida Siegel
Number
OH 166
OH 167
Subject
Charities
Women
Interview Date
22 Jul. 1971
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Eva Kayfetz
Total Running Time
OH166A: 47.minutes OH166B: 5. minutes OH167A: 29. minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contOHt the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ida Siegel (née Lewis) (1885-1982) was born 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established The Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to Board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Hadassah-WIZO of Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Ida Siegel discusses the formation of Hadassah in Canada and how it evolved into Hadassah-WIZO. She describes the creation of separate Hadassah branches.

In this clip, Ida Siegel explains the events that led up to the formation of a committee that she headed to write a Constitution for Hadassah. She describes some of the struggles she encountered in the process.

Accession Number
2017-6-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-6-8
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.4 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1959-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Esther Matlow's involvement as both a member and as a former President of Hadassah-WIZO of Canada. By extension, the records also reflect the activities of World WIZO and Hadassah International. Included are meeting minutes and associated board reports; speeches and greetings; general correspondence; Hadassah publicity and informational materials including Orah Magazine; bulletins and president's newsletters; seminar materials; conference materials; and honours and certificates. There is also material related to Matlow's personal affairs, including letters written to news media outlets with her husband Irving, personal correspondence, and several cookbooks including one compiled of Esther's recipes created in 2001 in her honour. Also included is a personal memoir written by Irving Matlow for his children.
Administrative History
Esther (née Climans) Matlow (1930-2012) served as national president of the Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada from Nov. 1990 to Nov. 1993, presiding over the organizations 75th anniversary celebrations. Her term of office spanned an historic period from the events leading up to and including the Persian Gulf War to the signing of the Middle East peace accords. A forty-year member of the organization, she served it in a variety of executive capacities before her election as president. She was married to Irving Matlow for 60 years and had four children, Anne, Ruth, Elaine, and David. Esther passed away on 1 Dec. 2012.
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Library and Archives Canada hold the Esther Matlow fonds, MG31 H187.
Subjects
Women
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Matlow, Esther, 1930-2012
Hadassah-WIZO Organization of Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1983-1-10
Material Format
sound recording
textual record
Physical Description
2 audio cassettes
1 folder of textual records
Date
1977
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an interview and corresponding transcript, with Jack Shindman, past-president of JIAS, on immigration and his family.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Shindman, Jack
Drutz, Danny
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Rovno, Ukraine
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ida Siegel
Number
OH 168
Quantity
1
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
This is a recorded lecture for the Beth Tzedec Sisterhood group.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ida Siegel (née Lewis) (1885-1982) was born 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established The Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to Board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 1; Item 33
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
1
Item
33
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Apr. 1943
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 11 x 8 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Ida Siegel (nee Lewis) (1885-1982) was born 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Originally from Lithuania, her parents Samuel and Hannah Ruth (nee Ticktin) Lewis immigrated to the United States in the mid-1880s with their two sons, Abe and Charles. Ida was the only Lewis child to be born in the United States. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. Ida was educated in both Pittsburgh and Toronto public schools and attended the University of Toronto.
On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel at the Elm Street Synagogue. They had 6 children: Rohama, Leah Gittel (Labovitz), David Isar, Sarah (Sairlee), Avrom Fichel, Rivka Hadassah.
An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found the Daughters of Zion, the first ladies Zionist society in Canada, in 1899. She was also responsible for founding the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. She was instrumental in the organization of the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto, located on Elizabeth Street in the Ward. This eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements and the Toronto Board of Education (elected to Board, 1930-36) and the Toronto Bureau of Jewish Education (honorary secretary). In 1917, Ida helped to organize a fundraising body for the Jewish community known as the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. This would later become the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Ida Siegel.
Name Access
Siegel, Ida, 1885-1982 (subject)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Fonds 15 (Ida Lewis Siegel fonds).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 17
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
17
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1971]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is a portrait of Ida Siegel, possibly taken at the Dewson Street Public School.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Tobie Taback
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
23 Feb. 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Tobie Taback
Number
OH 136
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
23 Feb. 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
34 minutes 58 secons
Conservation
Copied November 2006
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Tobie Taback was the long-time secretary for the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society in Toronto. He retired in 1982.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (Toronto, Ont.)
Taback, Tobie
Lipinsky, Jack
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the helplessness faced by JIAS in bringing immigrants out of Europe during the period of Canada's strict "no immigration" policy.

In this clip, Tobie Taback discusses the activities of Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) employees during the years 1937-39, the obstacles they faced vis a vis immigrant applications and the "parcels to Russia and Poland" aid program run by JIAS.

Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
ID
Fonds 9-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Sous-fonds
Fonds
9-1
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1982
Physical Description
51 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region) and Halifax (Eastern Region). The national office was responsible for directing and managing all the affairs of the organization, including defining national and international policy; administration of regional offices; national budget; fundraising; external relations with other organizations, such as the United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) and Jewish Family & Child Services (JF&CS); and publicity. It also organized the annual meeting, special events and conventions.
Membership in JIAS was open to individuals, organizations or companies who paid an annual fee. General meetings of the membership were held at least once every two years, where reports were presented and considered, nominations and elections held for national officers and the national executive committee, policies, programs and problems discussed, and decisions taken.
The National Executive Committee of JIAS was composed of the following members: national president; three vice-presidents (the presidents of the Western, Central and Eastern regions), with the addition in the 1950s of a vice-president at large; three regional treasurers, eventually reduced to one national treasurer; secretary; and twelve members comprising four representatives from each region. In 1929 the ‘executive secretary’ position was renamed ‘executive director.’ According to the 1943 constitution, the executive was required to hold meetings at least three times a year, in alternate cities. In 1954 this was amended to twice a year.
During the early stages of JIAS's operations, it had to face the difficulty of being overstretched financially, as it sought to respond to and to change the often oppressive living conditions of new immigrants and the situation of those held in federal detention centres. The organization’s principled approach to immigrant welfare won JIAS much of its early success, as it became the preferred contact for government officials who had formerly dealt with numerous independent agencies, many of which had profited from the exploitation of desperate immigrants. This situation also profited the government, however, as the responsibility for establishing the priority of applications reverted increasingly to JIAS as it had to limit its appeals by the quotas imposed by the federal government.
JIAS was one of the founding organizations responsible for the establishment of the Canadian Council for Refugees (CCR) in 1978, which has since operated as a non-profit umbrella organization to coordinate the efforts of immigrant and refugee advocacy groups. JIAS continues to operate offices across Canada in Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Vancouver, Windsor and Winnipeg. The JIAS National Office moved from Montreal to Toronto in 1989, with the appointment of Susan Davis to National Director, and is now located at 4580 Dufferin St., Suite 306, Toronto, Ontario.
Scope and Content
Sous-fonds consists of National Office records retained by the Toronto JIAS office as reference copies. Records include meeting minutes, speeches and reports from annual meetings, and the published annual reports produced from the annual meetings. The sous-fonds covers the years 1926 to 1982 and is divided into the following series: 1. National Executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and 5. Photographs.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada (creator)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-12-2
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 film reel (ca. 22 min.) : 16mm
1 videocassette
Date
[ca. 1980]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one film reel and one videocassette copy of the JIAS film entitled "We Are Our Brother's Keeper".
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
9
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1925-1989
Physical Description
31.8 m of textual records
319 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
The Jewish Immigrant Aid Society of Canada was established in 1920 by the newly-formed Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC). A Toronto branch was established in a storefront office on Spadina Avenue, but the organization was rudimentary. As the enthusiasm that spurred the founding of CJC died out, JIAS soon faltered. Then in 1922 it was taken over and reactivated under the cooperative support of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto, B'nai B'rith, and the Council of Jewish Women. JIAS was legally incorporated on 30 August 1922. It also operated under the moniker of the Emergency Jewish Immigrant Aid Committee, and it changed its name to Jewish Immigrant Aid Services in 1954.
Charged with organizing emergency relief for European Jews in distress, JIAS became the central agency of the Jewish community to facilitate the lawful entry of Jewish immigrants into Canada, and provided them with welfare services, transportation, and assistance with accommodation and employment after their arrival. In addition, JIAS offered consultation services for sponsors of potential immigrants, ran a competitive foreign remittance service, and campaigned to counter the activities of unscrupulous steamboat agents, lawyers, and influence peddlers, or “shtadlanim,” who often victimized immigrants and sponsors alike.
In conjunction with similar efforts by the CJC, JIAS was also actively engaged in negotiating for the increased admission of Jewish immigrants to Canada. In 1923, the federal government instituted a permit-based immigration program and JIAS competed with travel agents and solicitors in the private sector for these limited quota permits. After combating the anti-immigration policies of the Depression era, the outbreak of war in 1939 virtually closed the already limited avenues for immigration.
JIAS Canada was organized into a national office in Montreal and regional offices in Winnipeg (Western Region), Toronto (Central Region), and Halifax (Eastern Region). The Central Region covered Ontario, and established a full-time head office in 1935 at 399 Spadina Avenue in Toronto (hence the Central Region was sometimes called simply the Toronto Office). The office later moved to 265 Spadina Avenue. JIAS Toronto’s board of directors met on a regular basis at different locations in Toronto, including 206 Beverley Street and in the Talmud Torah building at 9 Brunswick Avenue. The first JIAS Toronto board included notable Toronto residents such as Henry Dworkin, Mrs. Draiman, Mr. Kronick, Dr. Brodey and Mrs. Willinsky. The role of the board was to oversee the operations of the Central Region. It rendered decisions on issues relating to finances, procedures and policies, negotiations with the federal Immigration Branch, as well as individual cases that required their attention.
General meetings of the Central Region membership were held annually. The 1943 JIAS constitution states that regional annual meetings were to be held for “receiving and considering reports,” holding nominations and elections for the executive, and discussing JIAS’s program and policies.
In the post-war era, JIAS shifted its focus to renewed efforts on behalf of individual claimants and community support, while the focus for lobbying for a reversal of Canada's immigration policy fell increasingly under the jurisdiction of the CJC. A boom in immigration between 1947 and 1952 saw the arrival of large numbers of Jewish immigrants to all parts of Canada and the Toronto Office of JIAS renewed its efforts to meet the needs of this new influx. Major world events also sparked other waves of immigration from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, North Africa, and Russia, to which JIAS responded in turn. JIAS worked in conjunction with other immigrant aid societies such as HIAS, the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, in the United States, to facilitate immigration to the United States, and later to Israel, where many of the immigrants and refugees coming to Canada had family and ultimately settled.
Custodial History
Custody of these records was transferred to the Ontario Jewish Archives by JIAS in 1983, as preparations were under way for the move to a new facility in North York. Much of the material was in four-cubic-foot boxes and in file cabinets.
The accession was divided into three sections: files which were at the JIAS office and had been retained in their original order; files which had been retrieved from a flood in the basement of 152 Beverley St. and consequently had been thrown into dry boxes without regard to order; files discovered in the furnace rooms at 150 and 152 Beverley St., intact but covered in coal dust. The bulk of the records were stored off-site, with dirty files being isolated from the rest.
The dust-covered materials were cleaned at an off-site location, placed in temporary boxes and transferred to the Archives and restored, as far as was possible, to their original order.
Clips were removed and replaced as appropriate with archivally acceptable ones. All materials were transferred to acid-free folders and boxes.
Scope and Content
Fonds contains the records of the Toronto Office (Central region) of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada. The fonds consists primarily of textual records: minutes, correspondence, financial records, reports, immigration files, naturalization case files, social service case files and the records of attempts to trace missing individuals. There are also photographs of special events, speakers and arriving immigrants.
The fonds represents an important resource for the study of Canadian Jewry, especially when taken in conjunction with the JIAS National Office records at the Canadian Jewish Congress National Archives in Montreal, and those of the Western Office at the Library and Archives of Canada. It documents the means by which a particular Canadian ethnic community has dealt with the problems of rescue, settlement and government relations. These records also offer insight into the relationship between the Toronto Office and the other branches of JIAS, and invite comparison with similar agencies in the United States, as well as those of other ethnic groups in Canada.
The material collected includes information about the countries of origin, transportation routes, settlement and employment patterns of Jewish immigrants to Canada in the twentieth century. The documents also touch upon important related issues such as advocacy, sponsorship, admission processes, health and social problems.
These records cover several waves of immigration following the Second World War: Holocaust survivors in the late 1940s, Sephardic (North African) and Hungarian Jews in the 1950s, Russian and Czechoslovakian Jews in the 1960s, and additional Russians in the 1970s.
The records also contain significant information for those researchers looking to conduct genealogical research into Jewish immigrants and their descendents.
The fonds has been arranged with one sous-fonds, which contains the records of the National JIAS office in Montreal. In total there are 17 series. The Toronto office (main fonds) series are: 1. Board of Directors and Executive Committee Minutes; 2. Annual meeting proceedings; 3. Reports; 4. Legal ; 5. Administration; 6. JIAS Committees; 7. External committees; 8. Financial ; 9. Arrivals; 10. Immigration case files; 11. Social service assistance case files; 12. Photographs; 13. Miscellaneous. The National Office sous-fonds is divided into the following series: 1. National executive meeting minutes; 2. National annual meeting proceedings; 3. National annual reports; 4. Publications; and Photographs.
Notes
Physical description note: Physical extent is based on fully processed records. Additional accessions are not included (see Related Material note below).
Associated material note: The CJC National Archive, in Montreal, has additional JIAS records from 1920-1989 including 275 m of textual records and graphic materials (3250 photos): collection number I0037; alpha-numeric designation MA 4. The National Archives of Canada, Manitoba branch, in Winnipeg, has Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada JIAS textual records from 1923-1950 on 18 microfilm reels: Former archival reference number MG28-V114 (no replacement listed). The originals of these records are maintained by the Jewish Historical Society of Western Canada.
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
Other OJA records relating to JIAS may be found in the following accessions: 1979-9-5; 1988-5-2; 1991-10-5; 2006-3-11.
Creator
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Toronto
Accession Number
1983-8-1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Sarah Green
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
7 Jan. 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Sarah Green
Number
OH 4
Subject
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Neighborhoods
Interview Date
7 Jan. 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
38 minutes 44 seconds
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contOHt the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Sarah Green (née Patlik) grew up living in Toronto's Junction neighbourhood. The family home and scrap yard business were both located on Maria Street, which served as the centre for Jewish life in the Junction during the early 1900s. Sarah Patlik was involved with numerous charitable organizations including the Ontario Hospital School of Orilla and the Rubinoff and Naftolin Mishpocha.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Green, Sarah
Geographic Access
Kingston (Ont.)
Maria Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Portland Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Stanley Street (Toronto, Ont.)
West Toronto Junction (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 4 - Green\OH4_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
July 1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one DVD copy of a July 1985 interview of Dr. Stephen Speisman by the donor, recorded at the TJC Archives. Dr. Speisman discusses his family's connections with the Gold family because of their common background in Ostrow, Poland. He also talks about the socialist views of many Jewish immigrants, the factors influencing their desire to emigrate in the First World War era, their early experiences learning English, the reasons for Anglicizing their names, and the cultural values that Polish Jews brought to Canadian life.
Custodial History
DVD copy created from original videocassette created by the donor.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions: Any re-use requires written permission of the donor.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Socialism
Name Access
Speisman, Stephen A., 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1908]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 9 cm (sight, oval) and 10 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Photograph is a copy of a matted portrait of Ida Abramsky (1882-1950), daughter of Joseph Abramsky and Chaia Novack Abramsky. She was born in Bellorussia and came to Kingston with her family in 1896. She married Moe Breslin 1905 and lived in Toronto until her death in 1950.
Name Access
Abramsky, Ida
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Kingston (Ont.)
Accession Number
1982-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Newman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Newman
Number
OH 19
Subject
Families
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1975
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Spiesman
Conservation
Copied August 2003.
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Ben Newman was born in July 1920 in St Catharines, Ontario. He married Sheila Gould from Winnipeg, Manitoba. Ben's father, Abraham, immigrated to St. Catharines from Russia in 1909, living with his aunt and uncle and helping them with their junk business. His wife, Mary, and two children followed later. Four more children were born in Canada: Norman, Benjamin, Rebecca, and Gordon. Benjamin took over the company after Abraham’s retirement and turned it into one of the largest steel manufacturers in Canada. Ben Newman was active in all phases of Jewish life in the community and was the first Jewish aldermen in St. Catharines, a position he held for several years.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Newman, Benjamin
Newman, Sheila
Geographic Access
St. Catharines (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Toronto Section archival material sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 38; Series 7-13; File 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
National Council of Jewish Women of Canada fonds
Toronto Section series
Toronto Section archival material sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
38
Series
7-13
File
7
Material Format
textual record
Date
1931-1936
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of personal and professional correspondence belonging to Ida Siegel.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
25
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1933
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Always involved in the field of education, Ida Siegel became the first Jewish woman to be elected to the Toronto Board of Education in 1930. She held this post for six years. She was later named honourary secretary of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education.
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Ida Siegel. She is in formal dress. The photograph was used for the Board of Education composite portrait for 1933.
Notes
Stamp, verso:
Photograph by Ashley & Crippen
Please give credit line
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
26
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1964]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Irwin Lightman was born on 22 October 1919, in Vienna, Austria. He was the son of Samuel and Sarah Lichtman of Galicia, Austria. On 20 July 1946, he married Selma (née Vise) and together they had three children: Bernard, Ellen and Jonathan. Lightman was a dentist by profession. He was an active supporter of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Irwin (Litch) Lightman.
Subjects
Dentists
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 Mar. 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ben Kayfetz
Number
OH 210
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Law
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
4 Mar. 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Christie Pits riot at approximately minute 16:00
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Benjamin "Ben" Gershon Kayfetz was born on 24 December 1916 in Toronto. He married Eva Silver and had two children. Ben graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939, with a bachelor of arts in modern languages. He worked as a high school teacher in Huntsville, Ontario and Niagara Falls, Ontario between 1941 and 1943. In 1943, he joined the war effort, working for the Department of National Defense in postal censorship and was responsible for reviewing prisoner of war mail. After the war, Kayfetz traveled to British-occupied Germany, where he worked as a censor of telecommunications with the Control Commission until 1947. Upon returning to Toronto, he was hired as the national director of community relations by the Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC) and as the executive (national) director of the Joint Community Relations Committee (JCRC), a CJC-B'nai B'rith cooperative organization. He also served as the central region executive director of the CJC between 1973 and 1978. He worked to develop anti-discrimination laws and for the protection of minority and religious rights. Kayfetz was also actively involved in promoting the welfare of Jewish communities worldwide. He was awarded the Samuel Bronfman Medal by the Canadian Jewish Congress in 1985 and the Order of Canada in 1986. In addition to his professional activities, Kayfetz wrote articles for various Jewish publications under both his own name and the pseudonym Gershon B. Newman. He also gave a weekly radio address on CHIN radio addressing various contemporary Jewish issues and was actively involved in the Toronto Jewish Historical Society (serving as its president), the Canadian Jewish Historical Society, and the Yiddish Luncheon Circle. He died in 2002.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Balmy Beach Swastika Club
Canadian Jewish Congress
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Geographic Access
Toronto
Kew Beach
Christie Pits
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\AC 210, Ben Kayfetz\AC 210 notes.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz describes the skirmish between antisemitic and Jewish youths at Kew Beach in July 1933.

In this clip, Ben Kayfetz discusses the laws that restricted “Jews or other objectionable races” from purchasing, owning or renting properties in Toronto and summer resort areas. He describes the steps taken to change the law.

Name
Morris Silbert
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Silbert
Number
OH 123
OH 124
Subject
Agriculture
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Interview Date
1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Brooky Robins
Total Running Time
OH123_001: 30 minutes OH123_002: 31 minutes OH124_001: 46 minutes OH124_002: 44 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Silbert was born in 1912 on a farm outside of Hamilton. His parents came from Lithuania. His father arrived in Canada in 1905, and his mother and three older siblings joined him in 1906. Morris spent his youth growing up on farms. At the age of sixteen in 1928, he and his family moved to Hamilton. In his youth, Morris was involved in several Jewish organizations, including Young Judaea, AZA, and Hashomer Hatzair. He was married in 1938. He served in the army in 1943 during the Second World War. Morris was the second vice president of the Council of Jewish Organizations. He also served on the executive board as chairman of the nursery school board and participated in several committees.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Silbert, Morris
Robins, Brooky
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Wentworth
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH123_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH123_002_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH124_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH124_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family's farm in southern Ontario. He includes names of peddlers with descriptions of their wares and their carts.

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family

In this clip, Morris Silbert describes the restructuring of the Hamilton Jewish community as a result of the Depression in the 1930s. He explains how the Council of Jewish Organizations was formed to replace United Hebrew Association.

Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
15
Material Format
multiple media
Date
1892-1980
Physical Description
60 cm of textual records and other material
Admin History/Bio
Ida Lewis Siegel (1885-1982) was instrumental in the founding and development of several prominent Jewish organizations, such as the Daughters of Zion, Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada, the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society and the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. She was also particularly active in the educational sector and in campaigning for the rights of female educators. She was internationally known for her devotion to Jewish learning and for her contributions to the development of the Toronto Jewish community.
Ida was born to Samuel Lewis (b. 1859) and Hannah Ruth (Ticktin) Lewis (b. 1864) on 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She was the first child to be born in the United States after her parents immigrated from Lithuania. She had two brothers, Abe Lewis (b. 1880) and Charles S. Lewis (b. 1883). She attended elementary school in Pittsburgh, and in 1894, she and her family moved to Toronto.
On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel at the Elm Street Synagogue. Isidore was a travelling peddler, and later, owner of a store in Cochrane, Ontario. Together, they had six children: Rohama Lee (1905-?), Leah Gittel (Labovitz) (1907-2004), David Isar (1909-2004), Sarah (Sontag) (1912-1942), Avrom Fichel (1916-2010), and Rivka Hadassah (Gurau) (1923-2001).
Ida is credited with helping to found a large number of Jewish philanthropic and social organizations including the Daughters of Zion, the first ladies' Zionist society in Canada (1899); the Herzl Girls' Club (1904); Hadassah-Wizo Organization of Canada (1916); the Hebrew Ladies' Sewing Circle, which developed into the Hebrew Ladies' Maternity Aid Society (1907); the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A. (1919); the Women’s League of the United Synagogues of America in Toronto (192-); the Goel Tzedec Sunday School (1914); and the Goel Tzedec Sisterhood (192-). She was also named honorary president of the Beth Tzedec Sisterhood in 1953. With the help of her brother Abe, Ida formed the first free Jewish Dispensary in Toronto, located on Elizabeth Street in the Ward, which was the forerunner to the Mount Sinai Hospital.
Ida also helped form a unified fundraising body for the Jewish community known as the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies (1917), which would become the current UJA Federation of Greater Toronto. However, Ida was denied a seat on the executive after campaigning for a female representative.
Always involved in the field of education, Ida was one of the original founders of the Home and School Association in 1919. In 1930, she became the first Jewish woman to be elected to the Toronto Board of Education, a post which she held for six years. She was later named honorary secretary of the Toronto Board of Jewish Education. In 1937, she ran unsuccessfully for alderman in Toronto, but remained politically active with the Association of Women's Electors. She was active in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom from 1915 onward and was an outspoken opponent of both world wars. Throughout her lifetime, Ida held the position of national vice-president of the Zionist Organization of Canada, sat on the executive board of the Canadian Jewish Congress and was a member of the Jewish Historical Society.
Her religious affiliations were with Goel Tzedec, Beth Tzedec, Shaar Shomayim and the Beach Hebrew Institute.
Custodial History
The records were created by Ida Siegel and were in her possession until 1982. After her death, her son Avrom and daughter Rivka took possession of the records until they were donated to the archives in 1998 and 2004.
Scope and Content
Fonds consists of the records created and accumulated by Ida Siegel, documenting her personal and professional life, along with her philanthropic work. The types of records include personal reminiscences, diaries and memoirs, family correspondence, professional correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, newsclippings, oral histories and photographs.
Notes
Includes 30 photographs, 2 scrapbooks, 13 audio cassettes and 7 audio reels.
Name Access
Siegel, Ida Lewis, 1885-1982
Siegel, Isidore Hirsch
Siegel, Leah Gittel (Labovitz) (Sadker)
Siegel, Rohama Lee
Siegel, David Isar
Siegel, Sarah (Sontag)
Siegel, Avrom Fichel
Siegel, Rivka Hadassah (Gurau)
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Related Material
1979-1-3
1980-3-4
MG2 O1l
MG2 O1m
National Council of Jewish Women fonds 38
Arrangement
Records had previously been placed in acid free boxes and file folders and labeled according to their contents.
Creator
Siegel, Ida Lewis, 1885-1982
Accession Number
1988-2-13
2004-5-129
2004-5-163
2005-5-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
21
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[197-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
For ten years, during her 80s, Ida volunteered her time to teach civics classes to immigrant children at the Dewson Street Public School in Toronto. She spoke with the children about her own experiences as an immigrant in Canada and arranged for special field trips.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait photograph of Ida Siegel in a children's library. It was likely taken at the Dewson Street Public School in Toronto.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
20
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1905]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a studio portrait of Ida Siegel in a profile position.
Notes
Photo by Milne Studios Limited, Toronto.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Physical Condition
Photograph is in very poor condition. It has become brittle and cracked and is torn is several areas.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Dec. 1945
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 17 x 22 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of Ida Seigel flanked by her sons Avrom (left) and David (right) who were both Canadian servicemen at the time. There are several other people standing behind them. The young woman in the front to the left is Ida's daughter Rivka.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 19
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
19
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[191-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tintype) ; 6 x 5 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of two women and Ida Siegel (standing far right). The three women are all wearing summer dresses.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 27
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
27
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1901]
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 14 x 10 cm on matte 21 x 14 or smaller
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Ida Lewis at the age of sixteen. The photograph was taken for Ida's high school graduation. She is dressed in a gown and hat and is standing next to an ornate chair in a studio setting.
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2005-5-3
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rabbi Dr. Israel Frankel was born 7 March 1909, in Stryj, Galicia to Rabbi Asher Isaiah and Bath Sheva Frankel. He moved to Dublin, Ireland where he was ordained in 1929. He married Faygie (née Steinberg) and together had four children: Bath-Sheba, Joshua, Asher and Esther. In 1950, the family immigrated to Toronto.
Rabbi Frankel was director of Camp Galil, former lecturer at Midrashah L'Morim, on the executive of Mizrachi and Hapoel Hamizrachi and executive director of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. He was the Rabbi at Shaarei Tzedec Synagogue for many years.
Rabbi Frankel died in 1977, at the age of 68.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Rabbi Dr. Israel Frankel.
Name Access
Congregation Shaarei Tzedec (Toronto, Ont.)
Frankel, Israel
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
1970-1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to Rolf Lederer's role with the Canadian Jewish Congress' Chaplaincy Services Committee, JIAS, and Congregation B'nai Torah. The records include meeting minutes and agendas, correspondence, reports, financial records, bulletins, invitations, and pamphlets, In addition, there is one document that lists the founders of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Rolf Lederer until they were donated to the Archives on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Dr. Rolf Lederer was born in Hamburg, Germany in 1934. His family immigrated to South Africa in 1936 and Rolf remained there until 1961, earning his medical degree from Cape Town University. After completing his psychiatric training in Edinburgh and Boston, Rolf settled in Toronto in 1968. There he set up private practice as a General Psychiatrist.
After moving to Toronto, Rolf became actively involved in the Jewish community and served on a number of committees. He was on both the local and national board of directors of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) as well as a number of JIAS sub-committees, including the South African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC), the Local Case File Committee and the Management Committee.
From 1985 to 1988 Rolf was chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’s (CJC) Chaplaincy Services Committee. He was also a member of other CJC committees; including, the Jewish Cultural Council and the Joint Adult Education Committee. In addition, Rolf co-founded the Jewish Genealogical Society (JGS) in 1985 and served as the society’s president from 1987 to 1991. Finally, he was an active member of B’nai Torah Congregation, serving as secretary and first vice-president in the early 1980s
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Dora Till
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 May 1983
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dora Till
Number
OH 151
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Labor
Labor unions
Women
Occupations
Interview Date
4 May 1983
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
46 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Dora Till (née Tobias) was born in New York City in 1896. She came to Toronto in 1900. She married Morris Till in 1918. They had one daughter, Cecile. As a youth, Dora was involved with Herzl Girls and the Boot and Shoe Society. Dora was active in community service and contributed greatly to social service work. She was co-founder and first president for the Mothers' and Babes' Summer Rest Home, vice president of the Hebrew Maternity Aid Society, a board member for the Jewish Family and Child Services, an executive for the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, honorary vice president of United Jewish Welfare Fund, on the board of Canadian Jewish Congress and past president of the Naomi Chapter of Hadassah-WIZO.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Herzl Girls Boot and Shoe Society, 1920
Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home
Baycrest Hospital
United Jewish Welfare Fund
Beth Tzedec Synagogue
Timothy Eaton Company
Till, Dora
Geographic Access
Toronto
Bronte
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Dora Till discusses some of the services provided by Hebrew Maternity Aid.

Dora Till was co-founder and first President for Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home. In this clip, Dora describes the efforts to solicit and fundraise on behalf of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.

Accession Number
2015-12-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-7
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 10 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1986, 1991-2015
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the personal and professional activities of Janice Benatar. Personal records include a family tree, speeches Janice delivered at the Lipa Lippers Toastmaster's Group meetings, a Sephardic cookbook, immigration papers, and a Sharon School Reunion invitation for alumni living in Toronto. Also included are photographs of Janice with her family, performing in a ballet production with the Academy of Ballet and Jazz, with her newborn son, at her son's bar mitzvah at Chabad Flamingo, and with the keys to her first home in Thornhill. Also identified in photographs are: Elan Levitan, Viviane Benatar, Michael Benatar, Claudia Benatar, Rachel Pasternak, and Samuel Pasternak.
Also included are speeches, invitations, event programs, and video recordings of Book Of Life events as well as a bookmark that was designed by artist Enya Keshet for Book of Life honourees. Finally, accession also includes Professional Advisory Committee meeting minutes (2009-2015) and breakfast seminar presentations (2014-2015).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: includes 7 photographs, 4 DVDs, 200 KB of textual records, and 1 bookmark.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Philanthropy and fundraising
Women
Name Access
Jewish Foundation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 8
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
8
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[190-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 7 cm on matte 9 x 11 cm
Admin History/Bio
A. Hershop may have been a cousin of Ida's, since she had a cousin named Max Wershop who lived in New York State.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait photograph of the nephew of Ida Siegel and another unidentified man. The handwriting on the verso of the photo reads: From your affectionate nephew [A. Wershop?].
Subjects
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1996-6-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1996-6-2
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
15 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records of the Council of Jewish Federations of Canada. Also included within the records are those of the National Budgeting Conference (NBC).
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Council of Jewish Federations of Canada
National Budgeting Conference
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1986-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1986-11-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
4.2 m of textual records
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the operations of the Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Casa.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1988-10-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
Date
1986-1987
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the Executive Director files of the CJC, Central Region. The files were created and accumulated by E. Y. Lipsitz.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-5-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1990-5-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 m of textual records
Date
[197-]-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting various activities of the Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region, including the small communities, regional committees, eduction and culture. The records appear to have originated with E. Y. Lipsitz.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Lillian Beube
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1972
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Lillian Beube
Number
OH 27
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
1972
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
AccessionNumber
1978-2-2
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Second side inaudible
Use Restrictions
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Beube, LIllian
Silbert, Morris
Geographic Access
Hamilton (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2012-7-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-7-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
37.8 m of textual records
Date
1958-[199-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of general office files of the CJC as well as records related to the Education and Culture Committee, the Toronto Jewish Cultural Committee, Planning and Priorities/Assimilation, the Youth Committee, CJC plenaries, small communities, Chaplaincy, Orthodox Division, Political Liaison Committee, community services, the Audit Committee, Joint Community Relations Committee, Camp Massad and Moess Chitton.
Custodial History
There is no acquisition information for this material. The accession number has been assigned by the archivist.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
moving images
Physical Description
11.1 m of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 2000]-[ca. 2010]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the operations of the CJC Ontario Region. Included are records related to the activities of the Community Relations Committee, reports, correspondence, political affairs records, communications, meeting minutes and agendas, photographs, and moving images of various events.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes graphic material and audio-visual records
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 presentation piece : 50 x 42 cm
Date
[ca. 1982]-[ca. 1983]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one folder of textual records related to the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto and one presentation piece in the form of a framed photograph of Hilda Naiman complete with a commemorative plaque.
Custodial History
Records came via Shelly Rotman, Adminstrative Assistant with the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Administrative History
Hilda Naiman was the former Executive Secretary of Toronto Jewish Congress when they were located on Beverley Street in Toronto.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Haiman, Hilda
Toronto Jewish Congress
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-6-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1956-1962
Scope and Content
Accession consists CJC correspondence and conference notes, Ottawa JCC building campaign materials, a Beth David congregation of Brantford report and the Mizrachi Women's Work report.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Beth David Congregation (Brantford, Ont.)
Ottawa Jewish Community Centre
Mizrachi Women (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Brantford, Ont
Ottawa, Ont
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-8-10
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
5 cm of textual records
Date
1988-2014
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Cyrel Troster's Jewish communal involvement, particularly with cultural planning for UJA Federation. Included are event inviations, program books, brochures, a postcard, meeting minutes, reports, and flyers. Records relate to the following agencies and projects: UJA Federation of Greater Toronto, the Tomorrow Campaign, Anshei Minsk Synagogue, Holy Blossom Temple, Shareeh Haim Synagogue, the Jewish Museum in Toronto, reports on Jewish education in Toronto, the Toronto Jewish Film Festival, the Holocaust Centre of Toronto, and the Koffler Centre. Of note is a copy of a study commissioned by UJA Federation for Frank Gehry, who was originally approached to design the Koffler Gallery.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-2-1
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
2006-2011
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Executive Committee and Board of Director packages distributed to members prior to meetings. Included in the packages are previous meeting minutes, agendas, and ancillary reports. The Executive Committee packages are from 2006-2008 and 2010-2011 and the Board of Director packages are from 2006-2008.
Use Conditions
UJA Federation meeting minutes and general correspondence are closed for 10 years from date of creation. Contracts and donor agreements are permanently closed.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1960-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the constitution of the Jewish Community Council of Windsor, a document outlining the Description and Function of the Council, documents of the names of the officers, directors and governors for 1962-1963, a document of the Windsor Jewish Community Centre activities and a document on the personnel practices of the Council.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of the textual records
Administrative History
The Jewish Community Council of Windsor was an outgrowth of the Zionist Organization of Canada (ZOC).
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Jewish Community Council of Windsor
Zionist Organization of Canada
Places
Windsor (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-31
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-9-31
Material Format
sound recording
Physical Description
2 audiotapes
Date
1969
Scope and Content
Accession cosists of two audiotapes of a Regional Executive Meeting of January 1969 and a Community Town Hall Meeting of February 1969. The second tape may be of speeches at a plenary session.
Custodial History
There is no information on the acquisition of this material.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Canadian Jewish Congress, Central Region (Toronto, Ont.)
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2017-7-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 10 m of textual records and graphic material
Date
1973-2017
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to the operation of Reena including executive materials, committee records, general correspondence, policy documents, promotional materials and photographs.
Administrative History
Reena was established in 1973 by a small group of parents of children with developmental disabilities as a practical alternative to institutions. In 1977 Reena began to receive funding from the Ontario Ministry of Community and Social Services. Reena is also funded by the community through the Reena Foundation and by the United Jewish Federation of Greater Toronto. Reena today provides programs and support to close to 1,000 persons in a variety of residential locations. The Toby and Henry Battle Developmental Centre was opened in 1999 for day and evening programs for children and adults with a developmental disability. Located in Vaughan, this unique building features a wellness and health centre, sports centre, creative arts workshop, computer lab, greenhouse and library, all with activities tailored to the individual skills and interests of its members. The Battle Centre is also the site of Reena’s administrative offices. Recognising the increasing needs of individuals with developmental disabilities as they age, Reena opened its first home dedicated to seniors in 2000, followed by another such home in 2007. An innovative new housing alternative, the Reena Community Residence, was officially opened in September 2012 in the heart of the Lebovic Jewish Community Campus in Vaughan. It provides apartments for 84 adults with developmental, cognitive, physical or mental health needs. Designed as an Intentional Community for individuals with special needs, the residents will be truly integrated into the community as they access all the facilities and programs the campus has to offer.
(from http://www/about/history-Reena/ accessed 27 July 2017)
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Reena (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-6-7
Material Format
textual record
sound recording
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
6 cassette tapes
Date
1973-2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting Cyrel Troster's involvement with various Jewish committees and organizations. Included are: transcripts of oral histories with prominent Jewish Torontonians that were conducted as part of an oral history project in 1973; correspondence between Cyrel Troster and interviewees; index cards listing the dates of the oral history interviews; promotional materials for Jewish arts festivals; public proposal document for the new Shaarei Shomayim Synagogue; and documents and records from Cyrel's involvement in various Jewish organizations. Also included are Local Initiatives Program application forms (1973), lists of presidents of various Jewish organizations, a map of the Jewish York Region (1999), issues of Exodus Magazine in both English and Russian from May 2018, and two issues of the Wilson Heights High School yearbook The Torch (1962-63).
The six tape cassettes are as follows: Cantor Paul Kowarsky Live in Concert (no date); Highlights from the 1994 Toronto Jewish Storytelling Festival; interview with Esther Volpe (two cassette tapes); interview with Samuel Harris; and one cassette marked "Dov Noy copy of Library tape" (Dov Noy was a Jewish folklorist).
The accession contains transcripts for the following interviewees: Mrs. Arbus, David Biderman, Benjamin Brown, Benjamin Sherman, Arthur Cohen, Mrs. Draimin, Max Federman, Morris Flicht, Joshua Gershman, Samuel Harris, Ben Heisel, Rose Heisel, Mr. Lean, Mary Levy, Harry Pullan, J. B. Salsberg, Yekil Silverman, A. S. Socol, Nathan Strauss, Esther Volpe, and Annie Zeidman.
The accession contains records related to Cyrel's involvement in the following committees and organizations: Committee for Yiddish (1997-2004); Cultural Services and Planning Committee (1990-2005), Jewish Public Library (2005); Canadian Jewish Congress, Orthodox Division (1982-1984); Holocaust Centre (1979-2004); Limmud (2000); Ontario Jewish Archives (1973-2004); Jewish Theatre (1996-2002); Jewish Arts Council (2000-2004); Jewish Toronto Tomorrow (1994-2004); Ashkenaz (1997-2004); UJA Federation (1978, 1984, 1990-2004).
Use Conditions
Credit to be given to Susan Cohen and Cyrel Troster—coordinators of the Local Initiatives Project project in 1973—and to interviewer(s) and transcribers when using tapes or transcribed interviews.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accession 2017-4-6 for related sound recordings. Some may be duplicates.
Subjects
Nonprofit organizations
Name Access
Committee for Yiddish (Toronto, Ont.)
Limmud Toronto
Ontario Jewish Archives
Troster, Cyrel
UJA Federation of Greater Toronto
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-2; File 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-2
File
35
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
This file contains one report created for the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Publication Committee series
Y-Time newspaper sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 3-1; File 25
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Publication Committee series
Y-Time newspaper sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
3-1
File
25
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
This file consists of three issues of the Y-Time newspaper.
Accession Number
1984-7-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2007-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2007-6-7
Material Format
object
Physical Description
17 pins
Date
[19--]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 17 pins, 9 of which have been identified. The pins that have been identified are as follows; four Order of Foresters pins, two Order of the Moose pins, a Pride of Israel Sick Benefit Society pin, a Canadian Medical Association/Ontario Medical Association pin and a Zion Magen David pin.
Source
Archival Accessions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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