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Accession Number
2016-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm
Date
1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of Dave and Carl Loewith with a newborn calf as Wentworth County Farmers of the Year.
Photo Caption: Wentworth County's Farmers of the Year, Dave and Carl Loewith, with newborn calf, (Ancaster, ON), 1980. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Heritage Centre, Accession # 2016-11-4. Permission for use given by the Hamilton Spectator.
Administrative History
The Loewith family operates J. Loewith and Sons Ltd. Summitholm Holsteins located in Ancaster, Ontario, Canada. The Loewith family began dairy farming in 1947, nine years after Joe and Minna Loewith arrived as refugees from Czechoslovakia. In its early days, Joe and Minna operated the farm with 16 cows. As of 2016, the farm maintained about 700 cows, 320 of them being milked daily. The farm produced 4.4 million litres of milk in 2008. Including rented land, about 700 acres are in production. The farm has won numerous awards, including being named the top managed dairy herd in Ontario and western Canada in 2008. Care and concern are the keystones of the operation, which is headed by Carl, Dave, and Carl’s son Ben. The philosophy of the farm is to ensure cows are never yelled at or abused physically, that the cows are properly cleaned and rested, and that their individual health is constantly monitored. The progressive nature of the farm has attracted the attention of nearby University of Guelph, a Canadian leader in farm research that has been involved in several studies at the Loewith farm.
Use Conditions
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Agriculture
Communities
Name Access
Loewith, Dave
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-29
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-29
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1911
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one original and one photocopy of Joe Krapivka's naturalization certificate. According to the certificate, Joe immigrated from Russia and became a restaurant keeper in Toronto.
MG_RG
MG1 A1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Restaurants
Name Access
Krapivka, Joe
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Paul Abeles
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
14 Jun. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Paul Abeles
Number
OH 87
Subject
Farmers
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
14 Jun. 1976
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
45.05 minutes
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Paul Abeles was born on 15 November 1906 in Czechoslovakia. He was a successful businessman and part of a group of four local businesspeople with Leon Rotberg, Jack Rotberg and Jack Brown who bought and rented business properties in the city. The group were also referred to as the “Brantford Companies,” set up to own and manage warehouse properties in the City of Brantford.
Paul was active in the Brantford Jewish community and represented Brantford at the Second Regional Leadership Conference in London, Ontario on 27 March 1960, where over seventy-five representatives of regional Jewish communities gathered. At this conference, Paul was presented with an award of recognition for his volunteer endeavours.
Paul was one of thirty-nine families who immigrated to Canada in 1939 from Czechoslovakia and placed on farms. He was married to Rita Abeles (née (Glaser). He passed away in March 1989.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Geographic Access
Brantford (Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 87 - Abeles\OH87_Transcript.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fanny Gertzbein
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
2 Oct. 1984
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Fanny Gertzbein
Number
OH 33
Subject
Charities
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
2 Oct. 1984
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Morris Silbert
Total Running Time
OH 033: 27:34 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003.
Notes
Language: Fanny often speaks Yiddish with Morris Silbert providing a translation.
Related group of records external to the unit being described: accession 2019-7/2 includes comments by Gella Rothstein on this oral history.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Fanny Gurtzbein (née Goldhar) immigrated from Poland to Toronto in 1903. Fanny lived with her parents and siblings in Toronto's Ward district. Although raised in poverty, Barney, Fanny's brother, went on to become a successful furrier; Fanny's mother, Tzyerl Goldhar, became the organizer of the Mothers and Babes Summer Rest Home.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
Yiddish
English
Name Access
Goldhar, Myer
Goldhar, Tzeryl
Goldhar, Barney
Gurtzbein, Fanny
Geographic Access
St. John's Ward (Toronto, Ont.)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 33 - Gertzbein\OH33_001_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Denise Rootenberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
25 Jun. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Denise Rootenberg
Number
OH 418
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--Zimbabwe
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
25 Jun. 2015
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 418 part 1: 16 min.
OH 418 part 2: 16 min.
OH 418 part 3: 16 min.
OH 418 part 4: 4 min.
Biography
Denise Rootenberg (née Abrahamson) was born in Harare, Zimbabwe (then Salisbury, Rhodesia). One of four sisters, she grew up in a warm Jewish community that was able to sustain an Ashkenazi synagogue, a Sephardic synagogue, and a small Reform synagogue. One of her aunts ran the local chapter of the Women’s International Zionist Organization with her sister. The aunt’s sister, meanwhile, made costumes for the repertory theatre company. Denise’s aunts also did kosher catering for simchas.
Because the Jewish community in Zimbabwe was so small, Jewish parents encouraged their children to attend university in South Africa, where they were less likely to marry outside the faith. Consequently, Denise attended university in Cape Town, living in residence for three years with one of her sisters. Ultimately, the sisters decided Cape Town was not for them and moved to Johannesburg. It was in Johannesburg that Denise met her husband, with whom she had a son. In 1989, they left South Africa to come to Canada.
The couple’s first few years in Canada were difficult ones as Denise and her husband struggled to find work and adjust to Canadian society. Eventually, however, things began to fall into place. Denise found work as an editorial assistant and then became a research analyst. Her husband, meanwhile, secured a job that enabled the couple to send their son to Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Community Hebrew Academy of Toronto (CHAT).
Denise and her husband belong to Aish Toronto. Their son married his wife at the synagogue.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Rootenberg, Denise
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
Harare (Zimbabwe)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Denise was born in Zimbabwe. At age eighteen, she moved to Cape Town to attend University. At age 31, she immigrated to Toronto.
00:23 Denise’s maiden name was Abramson. She tells the history of the family name.
00:55 Denise's grandparents came to Zimbabwe from Poland via Sweden before the First World War.
01:16 Denise describes the jobs of her maternal and paternal grandfathers.
02:09 Describes immediate family.
02:46 Denise discusses the Jewish community of her youth in Salisbury, Rhodesia (today Harare, Zimbabwe) comprised of three synagogues. Denise's father was president of the Ashkenazi synagogue several times.
04:24 Denise shares memories about celebrating the Jewish holidays and the involvement of her aunts in the Jewish community.
06:06 Denise attended a small Jewish day school until grade seven. She attended a public high school. She recalls the bar mitzvah party from her youth.
07:26 Denise explains why she left Zimbabwe (then Rhodesia). She attended university in Cape Town, South Africa following her older sister. Other Jewish students attended university in Johannesburg.
08:40 After university, Denise and her sister moved to Johannesburg. Her sister later moved to Israel, where she married, and they later moved to the United States.
09:00 Denise discusses her husband's family. Her father-in-law grew up in Lithuania and came to South Africa, where he lived with his aunt and later married his younger cousin. Denise recounts a colourful story about her father-in-law's journey to South Africa. Denise describes her faith-in-law's various business ventures and his dealing with white and black businesses that were segregated at the time.
12:15 There were three sons in her husband's family: David, Allan, and Lennie (Denise's husband). David, the eldest, was adopted. Denise relates stories involving David and his involvement with a racist, right-wing Afrikaans movement.
15:11 Denise and her family immigrated to Toronto in 1989.
Part 2:
01:00 Denise discusses her relationships with blOHks while growing up. She attributes her more liberal views to her mother's kindness. She recalls (with shame) the poor living conditions of the blOHks.
02:30 Denise discusses mandatory military service in South Africa and Zimbabwe.
03:29 Denise's husband joined the police force as a way of avoiding military service. She relates a frightening incident during the Soweto riots in 1976 involving her husband while he served in the police force.
05:52 Denise recounts her husband's constant fear that he would be required to arrest someone he knew.
06:05 Denise explains why she did not get directly involved with anti-apartheid groups and politics. Her first strong awareness of apartheid rose when she entered university.
06:57 Denise moved to Johannesburg after earning degrees in English and French at university. She describes her jobs in psychometric testing and as a proofreader for manuals for military equipment.
07:41 Denise recounts a story about the father of a boyfriend who was arrested for entering the townships without a permit and was represented by Nelson Mandela.
08:33 Denise describes how she met and eventually married her husband. Their son Mark was born in South Africa.
08:56 Denise's brother Allan and his family had already moved to Toronto.
09:37 Denise reports taht her husband's family in South Africa had the tradition similar to her own of having large holiday meals and seders.
10:00 A large contigent of her husband's family immigrated to Australia and a small segment immigrated to Canada.
10:07 Denise explains her reasons for coming to Canada. She considered Australia. She discusses early regrets for having chosen Canada rather than Australia. She discusses how in hindsight, and for a variety of reasons, she made the best choice.
13:19 Denise discusses her worries stemming from being a much pampered child growing up.
14:30 Denise describes how unsettled they felt when they first moved to Canada. She recounts a story about returning to South Africa to visit family after they had been in Canada for eighteen months. Her relatives' home was vandalized.
Part 3:
00:00 As a result of this traumatic incident, Denise and her sisters made a decision not to return to South Africa.
01:28 Denise describes some of the struggles she encountered when she initially moved to Toronto and she discusses some of the fOHtors that contributed to feeling more settled and welcomed. Specifically, she shares a story about the efforts made by a Canadian family whose son was in her child's daycare.
04:40 Denise identifies some of the differences in religious observance between South Africa and Toronto.
06:50 Denise explains her choice of education for her son.
07:35 Denise discusses her husband's educational training and lists his work history in Toronto.
08:49 Denise explains that other than education subsidies she was unaware of other services offered by Jewish agencies to assist new immigrants and those struggling financially.
09:28 Denise outlines her work experience in Toronto and some of her work experience in South Africa.
11:19 Denise expresses appreciation for the benefits and treatment she received at her workplOHe. Specifically, she notes how she was OHcomodated after returning to work following cancer treatments.
12:18 Denise discusses the evolution of her religious observance.
15:00 Denise discusses her husband's mental health. She addresses associated issues and impOHt of his mental health on work and family. She identifies his experience with the police in Soweto as a fOHtory contributing to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).
Part 4:
02:25 Denise identifies some of the fOHtors that have enabled her to deal with the many life challenges she has encountered.
Source
Oral Histories

We Thought we were Orthodox

Name
Isidore Kaplan
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
3 Jun. 1975
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Isidore Kaplan
Number
OH 9
OH 10
Subject
Business
Communities
Interview Date
3 Jun. 1975
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Sophie Milgram
Total Running Time
009A: 29 minutes 009B: 41 minutes 010A: 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Reduced sound quality at times.
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Isidore Kaplan was born in Vilna in 1910. His father was the first Jew to settle in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. Isidore's father, a successful businessman, opened a general store in 1915 and a movie theatre in 1923. The Jewish community of Kirkland Lake grew to 135 families and was able to support a synagogue, kosher butcher, and after-school cheder at its peak.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Kaplan, Isidore
Milgram, Sophie
Geographic Access
Cobalt (Ont.)
Englehart (Ont.)
Kirkland Lake (Ont.)
Krugerdorf (Ont.)
Swastika (Ont.)
Vilnius (Lithuania)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 9, OH 10 - Kaplan\OH9_001_Log.doc
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 9, OH 10 - Kaplan\OH9_002_Log.doc
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 9, OH 10 - Kaplan\OH10_001_Log.doc
Source
Oral Histories

Isidore Kaplan's father was the first Jewish resident of Kirkland Lake, Ontario. In this clip, Isidore relates his father's journey in 1912 from Toronto to Kirkland Lake in northern Ontario via Engelhart and Swastika.

In this clip, Isidore Kaplan describes the decline of Kirkland Lake, Ontario

Name
Darrel Hotz
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
25 Jun. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Darrel Hotz
Number
OH 417
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
25 Jun. 2015
Quantity
6 files
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 36 min.
Biography
Born in 1959, Darrel grew up in Victory Park, a predominantly Jewish suburb of Johannesburg. The family—made up of Darrel, his parents, and his young brother—occupied a four-bedroom house on a half-acre of land just a short walk from the local Jewish day school. For Darrel, “Everything was pretty easy . . . growing up.” Although the family was not particularly religious, Darrel’s mother lit candles on Friday night and he attended a Zionist camp every summer. In his final year of high school, he won a Bible quiz sponsored by the South African Zionist Federation, for which he was awarded a trip to Israel to compete against other Jewish students from all over the world. Unfortunately, he did not perform as well in this second competition: Israeli yeshiva students took first, second, and third place.
Darrel’s family moved to Canada when Darrel was in his second year of university. Because there were no direct flights to Toronto from South Africa, the family flew first to Zurich and then to New York. From New York, they made their way to Buffalo, where they stocked up on goods prior to arriving in Canada. Unhappily for the Hotzes, North America was experiencing a terrible year in terms of weather and the winter jackets they had purchased in South Africa (said to be sufficient for surviving Arctic temperatures) proved inadequate. They immediately purchased a new batch of winter coats appropriate for Canada.
The Hotz family’s first few years in Canada were not easy ones. The dental credentials of Darrel’s father, an orthodontist, were not recognized and he was unable to practice for several years as a result. Darrel’s mother, who had not been in the labour force for twenty-odd years, had to return to work in order to help make ends meet. Eventually though, the family got itself settled and Darrel was able to complete his university education, going on to attend Osgoode Hall Law School and pass the bar. He worked for two law firms, one Jewish and one not, before starting his own practice.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Hotz, Darrel, 1959-
Geographic Access
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:30 Darrel was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1959.
00:47 Darrel provides a brief family history. His paternal grandfather came to South Africa from Shavl, Lithuania in 1917. His paternal grandmother came from Riga, Latvia with her family in about 1910. His father was born in a suburb of Johannesburg. His maternal grandparents were born in South Africa. His grandfather's family came from Lithuania at the turn of the century. His grandmother's family moved to England in the 1870s. His maternal great-grandfather fought in the Boer War and remained in South Africa.
03:08 Darrel discusses his grandparents' education. His maternal grandmother was educated in a convent.
04:44 Darrel explains how his mother adopted more Jewish practice following her marriage to his father.
05:15 Darrel's father was born in Johannesburg and his mother was born in Benoni.
05:32 Darrel describes how his parents met.
06:00 Darrel's father studied dentistry and specialized in orthodontics.
07:18 Darrel discusses the role of Judaism in his home. Darrel attended King David. Darrel describes his bar mitzvah.
09:03 Darrel describes his family's neighbourhood, Victoria Park.
10:12 Darrel describes his home and home life.
11:48 Darrel discusses the security situation and political leanings of the Jewish community in South Africa during his youth.
14:45 Darrel describes his minor personal involvement in politics.
15:44 Darrel discusses the good relationship between Israel and South Africa.
17:18 Darrel discusses his involvement at Habonim summer camp and the Habonim youth movement.
20:53 Darrel discusses his experience of competing in a Bible quiz in Israel after having won the contest in South Africa.
25:48 Darrel describes three subsequent trips to Israel: in 1984, in 2006, and in 2008.
28:08 Darrel explains his parents' decision to leave South Africa.
29:09 Darrel discusses conscription to the South African army.
30:40 Darrel's maternal uncle immigrated to Canada before his parents.
32:19 Darrel addresses some of the challenges faced by him and other members of his family with starting again in a new country.
36:50 Darrel discusses some of the factors and considerations that contributed to the decision to select Canada as their immigration destination.
38:49 Darrel describes his parents' look-see visit to Toronto before the family moved.
40:37 Darrel describes the application process for immigration to Canada and monetary restrictions imposed by South African government.
42:53 Darrel describes his family's journey to Canada via Buffalo, New York.
44:40 Darrel describes his family's arrival in Canada on 9 March 1979.
46:20 Darrel lists the various places his parents have lived since their arrival.
47:05 Darrel discusses some of the challenges faced by his mother when she arrived.
50:11 Darrel describes his education in Canada.
52:06 Darrel shares his views concerning the differences between Canadian and South African Jews.
55:26 Darrel discusses his son's social circle and religious and secular education history.
1:00:43 Darrel discusses how his family connected with the established South African community in Toronto.
1:03:41 Darrel describes his parents' involvement in the Jewish community.
1:09:14 Darrel discusses his career in law.
1:15:02 Darrel discusses meeting and marrying his wife, Barbara, in 2000 and their early years together. They have one son, Joey.
1:19:14 Darrel discusses Barbara and his involvement in Jewish communal work.
1:23:07 Darrel reminisces about Jewish foods eaten in South Africa.
1:24:24 Darrel explains how they chose Camp Gesher, affiliated with Habonim Dror, for Joey.
1:27:24 Darrel contemplates a return visit to South Africa.
1:31:20 Darrel mentions a few South African expressions and words.
1:32:34 Darrel offers his impressions of the differences between South Africans and Canadians.
1:33:44 Darrel reflects on his family's decision to come to Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

Being raised in South Africa

Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Number
OH 419
Subject
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Occupations
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 34 min.
Biography
Hilton and Shirley were born in Durban, South Africa in 1951. Although both were involved in the Habonim youth movement, the two did not meet until their first year in pharmacy school. After getting married and serving a brief stint in the military, Hilton left with Shirley on a trip overseas that included Europe and the United Sates, but whose ultimate purpose was the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Upon arriving in Montreal, the couple decided Canada would be a good place to live. By that point, they had resolved that they did not want their children to internalize the racial norms of apartheid South Africa. Cementing their decision was the fact Shirley’s sister was accepted into Canada shortly after the two returned to South Africa.
Hilton and Shirley’s immigration to Canada was complicated by the fact they were regarded by the government as students, not full-fledged pharmacists. When they came to Canada in August 1977, they therefore had to qualify as pharmacists, which they did by attending university while holding down full-time jobs as pharmacy technicians. Once certified, they moved to Dundas, where they opened a series of pharmacies and raised their children.
In 2007, the couple sold their Day Night Pharmacy chain to Rexall Pharma Plus. In 2014 Hilton and Shirley relocated to Toronto and now spend their time between Toronto and Vancouver to be close to their children and grandchildren.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Silberg, Hilton, 1951-
Silberg, Shirley, 1951-
Geographic Access
Dundas (Ont.)
Durban (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:38 Shirley was born in Durban, South Africa in 1951.
00:44 Shirley discusses her family history. Her maternal grandparents came to Durban in early 1800s from England. They married in South Africa. Her paternal grandparents came to Durban from Lithuania in the late 1800s. They married in South Africa. Her father was a physician specializing in physical medicine; her mother worked as his secretary.
03:31 Shirley describes her privileged early home life.
04:26 Shirley attended Hebrew day school.
05:06 Shirley describes her education and involvement in sports.
07:28 Shirley attended the Habonim youth movement.
08:13 Shirley discusses her early memories of politics and apartheid.
09:57 Shirley describes the impact an overseas trip to Europe and Israel had on her.
12:34 Shirley explains that she and Hilton considered immigrating to Canada and Israel. Her sister had immigrated to Canada and her brother had immigrated to England.
13:31 Hilton and Shirley attended the pharmacy school in Durban.
14:48 Hilton and Shirley married and moved to Johannesburg. Hilton completed mandatory service in the army.
15:37 Hilton was born in Durban on 26 October 1951. He discusses his family history. His maternal grandparents came from Lithuania. His mother was born in South Africa. His father's family came from Lithuania. His father was born in Lithuania. Hilton shares a story about his paternal grandmother's voyage from Lithuania to Pretoria with five children. When his parents were married they moved to Durban in the mid-1950s.
17:46 Hilton discusses his parents. His mother was an occasional secretary. His father was initially a tool and diemaker. Later, he worked in business. Hilton notes that his father was a semi-professional football player.
20:30 Hilton explains that his mother had a strong Jewish identity, but was not religious.
21:06 Hilton discusses his education in public school and Hebrew school.
21:58 Hilton reminisces about his childhood.
23:25 Hilton discusses how he and his sister became competitive ballroom dancers.
25:50 Hilton discusses his bar mitzvah training.
27:02 Hilton was active in the Habonim youth movement.
27:31 Hilton shares his impressions growing up under apartheid. He discusses discrimination, restrictions, and censorship.
30:33 Hilton discusses his mandatory military service.
36:22 Hilton and Shirley discuss how they met and dated.
37:45 Hilton discusses some of the factors that triggered the couple's decision to leave South Africa.
43:07 Hilton and Shirley describe how they struggled to accumulate money before leaving South Africa.
44:12 Hilton describes the efforts made to secure work and a visa for entry into Canada.
48:31 Hilton and Shirley describe the sentiments that surrounded their departure from South Africa.
49:40 Hilton and Shirley arrived in Canada on 25 August 1977.
50:30 Shirley shares anecdotes about her first experiences with household chores.
54:20 Hilton and Shirley discuss their few acquaintances/contacts when they first arrived in Canada.
55:40 Hilton explains how his outlook has changed since he moved to Canada.
57:41 Shirley describes the challenges of juggling work and pharmacy classes at the University of Toronto. Hilton and Shirley share some examples of cultural differences between Canada and South Africa.
1:01:05 Hilton and Shirley worked as pharmaceutical technicians.
1:03:53 Hilton explains how they became partners in a pharmacy in Dundas, Ontario. Hilton and Shirley discuss how they settled in and were welcomed into the Jewish community.
1:10:05 Hilton and Shirley brought Hilton's two sisters, brother, parents, and Shirley's mother to Canada.
1:11:02 Hilton explains the circumstances that led to a split with his partners. He changed the name of the pharmacy from Amherst Pharmacy to Hilton Pharmacy. He describes the growth of the business.
1:18:00 Hilton describes the expansion and success of the business to five pharmacies.
1:20:12 Hilton discusses his involvement in the Jewish and secular communities in Dundas.
1:20:57 In 2007, the business was purchased by Rexall.
1:21:33 Shirley explains the circumstances that prompted their move to Toronto via Vancouver.
1:23:55 Shirley describes a return visit to South Africa with her two youngest children.
1:25:22 Hilton reminisces about a family trip to London and South Africa in 1980.
1:27:08 Hilton describes his discomfort during a visit to Durban, South Africa in 1986.
1:28:40 Shirley relates an anecdote that occurred during their family trip to South Africa.
1:30:46 Hilton reflects on how much he appreciates being in Canada.
1:32:50 Shirley identifies becoming Canadian citizens as a turning point in their new life in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

https://vimeo.com/230208590

Immigration Tribulations

Who Has Left Over Matzah Balls?

The First Midnight Store

Name
Shane Teper
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
3 Nov. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Shane Teper
Number
OH 421
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
3 Nov. 2015
Interviewer
Gail Freeman
Total Running Time
46 min.
Use Restrictions
Written consent is required prior to the publication of all or any portion of this video/oral history on the internet.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Teper, Shane, 1965-
Geographic Access
Canada
South Africa
Original Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Silbert
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
1986
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Morris Silbert
Number
OH 123
OH 124
Subject
Agriculture
Immigrants--Canada
Nonprofit organizations
Communities
Interview Date
1986
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Brooky Robins
Total Running Time
OH123_001: 30 minutes OH123_002: 31 minutes OH124_001: 46 minutes OH124_002: 44 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Morris Silbert was born in 1912 on a farm outside of Hamilton. His parents came from Lithuania. His father arrived in Canada in 1905, and his mother and three older siblings joined him in 1906. Morris spent his youth growing up on farms. At the age of sixteen in 1928, he and his family moved to Hamilton. In his youth, Morris was involved in several Jewish organizations, including Young Judaea, AZA, and Hashomer Hatzair. He was married in 1938. He served in the army in 1943 during the Second World War. Morris was the second vice president of the Council of Jewish Organizations. He also served on the executive board as chairman of the nursery school board and participated in several committees.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Silbert, Morris
Robins, Brooky
Geographic Access
Hamilton
Wentworth
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH123_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH123_002_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH124_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 123, OH 124 - Silbert\OH124_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family's farm in southern Ontario. He includes names of peddlers with descriptions of their wares and their carts.

In this clip, Morris Silbert shares memories about Jewish peddlers who were welcomed on his family

In this clip, Morris Silbert describes the restructuring of the Hamilton Jewish community as a result of the Depression in the 1930s. He explains how the Council of Jewish Organizations was formed to replace United Hebrew Association.

Name
Ivan Zarenda
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
21 Jul. 2011
15 Jun. 2012
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Ivan Zarenda
Number
OH 434
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
21 Jul. 2011
15 Jun. 2012
Interviewer
Jessica Parker
Total Running Time
Part I: 46 min.
Part II: 1 hr. 4 min.
Biography
Ivan’s parents arrived in South Africa from Lithuania around 1930. Prior to immigrating, they knew each other from Klykoliai, a shtetl in northwestern Lithuania. Ivan’s father was the first to arrive, taking up work at a concession store in the mining town of Brakpan. As for Ivan’s mother, she came over with her mother after her siblings had prepared a home for them in Brakpan. After being sent to a convent in Rhodesia in order to learn English, she returned to Brakpan where she married Ivan’s father. Together, the couple raised two children, who grew up with their maternal grandmother, who only spoke Yiddish. Consequently, Ivan grew up speaking Yiddish as well as English. He even gave his bar mitzvah speech in Yiddish, causing his Lithuanian grandmother to beam with pride.
Although they were not well off, Ivan’s parents managed to send their two sons to university. As an undergraduate, Ivan studied pharmacy at Rhodes University in Grahamstown. He met his wife while visiting his parents in Kimberley, where they had moved and were managing a hotel. The two were introduced on a blind date and corresponded for well over a year when Ivan went to do a post-graduate degree in industrial pharmacy at the University of Michigan. When Ivan returned to South Africa to take up a job in Cape Town, the two dated, became engaged, and married. In 1990, they immigrated to Canada with their two children as part of a job transfer. After a short stay in Brockville, the family relocated to Kingston, where they were active in Jewish life. Ivan’s wife, Daphne, passed away in 2006. He moved from Kingston to Toronto in 2018, joining his children Marc and Shelley and families who live there.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Zarenda, Ivan
Geographic Access
Kingston (Ont.)
South Africa
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

Friendship with Afrikaners

Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 61; Series 1-2; File 42
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Community Centre of Toronto fonds
Executive director series
Financial reports sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
61
Series
1-2
File
42
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
This file contains a statement of revenue for the Jewish Community Centre of Toronto and two summaries of expenses for the Y.M.-Y.W.H.A.
Accession Number
2004-5-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
30
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984-1985
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 31
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
31
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 32
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
32
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
12
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 28
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
28
Material Format
textual record
Date
1983-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 3-1; File 29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Director of school finances series
Chronological correspondence and memoranda sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
3-1
File
29
Material Format
textual record
Date
1984-1985
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1979-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 6; File 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Chronological correspondence and memoranda series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
6
File
11
Material Format
textual record
Date
1983-1984
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Frank Schleifer
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jun. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Frank Schleifer
Number
OH 84
Subject
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Recreation
Families
Interview Date
29 Jun. 1976
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
OH84_001: 45.20 minutes OH84_002: 11.00 minutes
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Frank was born on 4 January 1916 in Toronto. His parents were Charles Schleifer and Mary Schleifer (née Noble). At the age of three, his family moved to Sturgeon Falls, Ontario. In 1922, the family moved to Brantford, Ontario, where his mother's family lived. Frank left school at age sixteen to work at the family Cigar and Soda Fountain store when his father became ill. He opened Frank’s Billiard Parlour from 1941 to 1946. He was drafted into the army in 1943, where he served in the artillery and infantry. He started to work in Unemployment Insurance with the federal government. Frank married Bertha (née Maltifer ?) in 1937. They had one son, Charles, born in 1947. As a youth, Frank was involved with AZA (B'nai Brith youth organization). He was a member of B'nai Brith and served on the executive of the synagogue in Brantford.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Schleifer, Frank
Troster, Larry
Geographic Access
Brantford
Sturgeon Falls
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 84 - Schleifer\OH84_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 84 - Schleifer\OH84_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Frank Schleifer shares some early memories of growing up in Brantford, Ontario. He mentions some of the original Jewish families who settled in Brantford.

In this clip, Frank Schleifer describes his involvement in a variety of Jewish activities and groups during his youth, including AZA, summer camp and baseball.

Accession Number
1981-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
1928-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of David Waserman's Polish passport, Canadian immigration identification card stamped at Halifax upon his arrival on the Megantic, two copies of his birth certificate, a Polish police clearance document, and an army service book. There is also a Polish passport for Syma Nachsztern and her immigration identification card stamped upon arrival on the SS United States.
MG_RG
MG1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Waserman, David
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 4 cm
Date
1921
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and a passport photograph pertaining to the immigration of Joseph Kalman Wainryb (Wajnryb) age 17 from Warsaw, Poland to Toronto in 1921.These include his passport, legal and medical certificates, and ship's cabin and landing cards.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wainryb, Joseph Kalman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2 May 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one booklet for the annual meeting of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada, Central Region held at Temple Sinai with guest speaker Mr. Gaynor Jacobson, Executive Vice-President of H.I.A.S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Jacobson, Gaynor
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Stephen Pincus
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Stephen Pincus
Number
OH 415
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Interviewer
Jessica Parker
Total Running Time
1 hr. 23 min.
Use Restrictions
Restriction noted by interviewee on video/oral history release form: The foregoing is subject to OJA obtaining my prior written consent prior to placing any of the interview on the internet (other than password protected communications)
Researches should be directed to the access copy created by Stephen Pincus.
Biography
Although he grew up in South Africa, Stephen was born in England where his father was studying. When they returned to South Africa in 1963, they visited Israel on the way, and five-year-old Stephen fell in love with the exotic, young Jewish state.
As a teenager, Stephen was OHtive in Habonim, South Africa’s largest Zionist youth movement and became head of that movement in the late 1970s, running the largest Jewish youth camp in the world. Stephen was also elected chair of South Africa’s Zionist Youth Council, the umbrella body for all-Jewish youth organizations in the country. He and his wife Michelle then moved to Israel with a Habonim group that established Kibbutz Tuval in the western Galilee.
In 1982 Stephen came to study in Toronto. He served as administrator of Bialik Hebrew Day School and as camp director of Camp Shalom, while completing MBA and LLB degrees, and was awarded the Gold Medal at Osgoode Hall Law School. Stephen and Michelle started a family and both their own parents immigrated to Toronto.
Stephen is a senior partner and executive committee member at Goodmans LLP, is widely regarded as one of Canada’s leading business lawyers, and has played a pioneering role in the development of the country’s capital markets. He is is the founding chair of the Canada Africa Chamber of Business, a director of Kew Media Group, a member of the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel, chair of the board of Makom, and founder of Kaleidoscope, a unique multi-dimensional Israel engagement program.
He and his wife Michelle; their two married children, Daniel and Lisa; granddaughter Olivia; and therapy dog Mannee all live in Toronto.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Pincus, Stephen, 1958-
Geographic Access
England
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:56 Stephen discusses his family background, including notable forebears, his grandparents' immigration in the early 1900s, and the largely Lithuanian composition of the South African Jewish community.
03:04 Stephen discusses his South-African-born parents' backgrounds and how they met.
05:14 Stephen mentions that he was born in England in 1958, while his family was abroad for his father's medical studies. He lived there until they returned to South Africa in 1964.
06:25 Stephen remembers arriving in South Africa and all the family that had come to greet them who hadn't seen his parents for eight years. He mentions that all correspondence happened via mail.
08:01 Stephen describes his family's relationship to Judaism: They were Orthodox in name, but took a pragmatic approach. Stephen went to public school and received a lot of his Jewish education from Habonim.
09:27 Stephen describes his bar mitzvah celebrations. Stephen remembers preparing his speech. He enjoys public speaking and this was a starting point.
10:49 Stephen talks about the Habonim youth movement. Stephen's involvement began in his early teens. He became the head of the movement in the late 1970s and ran the camp for a couple of years. Stephen is organizing a trip this summer to Israel for alumni of Habonim.
14:50 Stephen explains that he has a foot in South Africa, Canada, and Israel.
15:43 Stephen talks about the unique environment in South Africa that contributed to Zionism. He talks about the Soweto Uprising in 1976. Israel was a place where South African Jews could create something better. Stephen finds it ironic that some see in Israel a continuation of apartheid.
19:53 Stephen talks about his parents' view of his involvement in Habonim. He relates a story where his father became upset when Stephen participated in a march protesting a United Nations resolution instead of studying for an exam.
21:37 Stephen's father was risk-averse and practical. He wasn't keen on Stephen moving to Israel and would discourage his son indirectly. Stephen went to Israel anyway.
22:20 Stephen's parents did not give voice to strong political views. Stephen remembers being at a poetry reading at a friend's parents' house when he was eight. It was his first mixed-race experience. Stephen and his friends were politically active in high school and as undergraduate students.
24:27 Stephen explains how Zionism and Israel were his major focus while the South African situation was secondary. Stephen remembers visiting Soweto a number of times.
26:00 Stephen discusses the paradox of under apartheid while opposing it. He sees this as a central issue that white South Africans of his generation faced. He discusses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings of the 1990s.
28:24 Stephen recounts how Israel fell into the arms of South Africa after being pushed away by various African states in the 1970s.
29:03 Stephen describes his involvement in resuscitating Machon Le'Madrichei Chutz La'Aretz, a year-long leadership course for youth leaders in Israel. South African Jews would defer their army service to participate. In 1975, the South African government determined it would not let Jewish students defer for this purpose.
31:16 Stephen discusses his decision to leave South Africa.
32:51 Stephen discusses how not going on Machon is one of his regrets.
33:28 Stephen discusses the places he considered immigrating to. He was focused on going to Israel and was part of a group that went to live on a kibbutz in the western Galilee.
37:24 Stephen discusses previous trips to Israel. The first time he went to the country was when his family went from England to South Africa. This was before the Six-Day War and he remembers barbed wire in Jerusalem. Stephen thinks he probably fell in love with Israel at this time.
38:32 Stephen explains the meaning of the words machon and garin.
39:23 Stephen describes the kupah meshutefet ("common treasury box") economic system. The system didn't last very long.
40:16 Stephen describes how his family and friends reacted to the news that he was making aliyah.
41:09 Stephen discusses a car trip he and his wife took throughout South Africa. He relates how they were caught in a flood and ended up being taken in by a black family. Stephen reflects on the irony of their situation.
44:07 Stephen discusses he and his wife's arrival in Israel. Stephen was accepted by Hebrew University to study law. Ultimately, he and his wife chose to move to Toronto at the beginning of 1982.
45:06 Stephen shares what he brought with him to Toronto from South Africa.
47:20 Stephen discusses his initial trip to Canada in January 1982. He thinks that it was the coldest winter Toronto experienced until 2014. He discusses some of the hurdles he faced adjusting to the new climate.
51:33 Stephen discusses settling in Canada and going to school.
56:25 Stephen discusses opening an issue of the Canadian Jewish News and seeing that a summer camp was looking for a director. He was director for a couple of years and he and his wife would spend their summer at the camp.
57:05 Stephen discusses how Habonim was different from Camp Shalom, the camp he worked at in Canada.
58:24 Stephen discusses his transition from being involved in a Zionist and socialist youth movement to ending up in business and corporate law. He notes that he has shifted in a number of respects in terms of his perspective on economic values, social values, and religious values.
1:02:55 Stephen discusses his experience integrating into Canadian society.
1:05:20 Stephen contrasts his parents' experience coming later in life with his own experience. They had a wonderful time when they came because there was a large community of retired South African expatriates by then.
1:09:54 Stephen discusses the role of the local Jewish community, and local South African Jewish community, played in his acclimatization.
1:11:59 Stephen discusses how he came to work for Goodmans.
1:14:17 Stephen discusses the differences he has noticed between Canadians and South Africans. He feels that South Africans as a group tend to be more direct than Canadians. In his opinion, South Africans lie somewhere between Israelis and Canadians in terms of directness.
1:17:51 Stephen discusses his journey, coming from a secular Zionist background and starting a program of Jewish learning later in life.
1:20:40 Stephen discusses his own approach to keeping Jewish traditions and customs. He is observant, but not dogmatic.
1:26:11 Stephen discusses his two children. His son is a medical resident and his daughter is finishing up a law/business administration program.
1:27:09 Stephen discusses synagogues he is involved with.
1:29:10 Stephen discusses cultural differences he has experienced raising his children in Canada.
1:33:04 Stephen explains the decisions he and his wife made regarding their children's education.
1:35:15 Stephen describes his children's relationships with their grandparents.
1:37:31 Stephen answers the question, "Do you feel Canadian?"
1:41:55 Stephen discusses his involvement with the Canada-South Africa Chamber of Business.
1:42:42 Stephen discusses the differences in being involved with the ex-South African community more broadly and the ex-South African Jewish community.
1:44:58 Stephen discusses his children's connections to South Africa, which he says are quite limited.
1:46:37 Stephen shares food words and expressions that he shared with his children and which they now use.
1:47:55 Stephen offers a few final remarks about his decision to immigrate to Canada and the relationship between Canadian identity, Jewish/Israeli identity, and South African identity.
Source
Oral Histories

Israel, the Opportunity for New Beginnings

An Indoor Life

Name
Karrie Weinstock
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Karrie Weinstock
Number
OH 435
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 435 part 1: 22 min.
OH 435 part 2: 11 min.
OH 435 part 3: 22 min.
OH 435 part 4: 5 min.
Biography
Karrie’s life has long been characterized by both privilege and an acute sensitivity to the challenges facing those less fortunate than herself. Although she grew up in a happy professional family, her childhood was marked by uncertainty. Her father, Jack Unterhalter, was a civil rights lawyer in the Apartheid era, active in left-wing politics, and Karrie recalls him keeping a packed briefcase by the door during the state of emergency in case the authorities should come for him.
As a young woman, Karrie studied to be an English teacher at Homerton College, Cambridge. She then returned to South Africa, where she taught for two years, before moving to Boston to pursue a master’s degree in educational administration, planning and social policy at Harvard. Upon graduating, she took a position at Milton OHademy, an independent school in Boston. She enjoyed her time there but chose to relocate to Toronto, where she had an aunt. For over three decades, she has worked at Branksome Hall, first as an English teacher, then as an administrator, and now in her current role as deputy principal.
In 1985, Karrie married Michael Weinstock, a native Torontonian, whose family embraced her as one of their own. Both Karrie and Michael had been married previously and through her marriage to Michael, she inherited three beautiful stepdaughters. Karrie and Michael had a child of their own, a son who shares his mother’s love of South Africa, visiting the country each year.
Recognizing her great fortune in life, Karrie gives back through her volunteer work with the Stephen Leacock Foundation, which, among other initiatives, supports low-fee independent schools in South Africa that are connected to independent and public schools in Canada so as to form a unique Triangle of Hope.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Weinstock, Karen
Geographic Access
Boston (Mass.)
Cambridge (England)
Jamestown (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Karrie outlines her immediate family. She was born in Johannesburg, South Africa.
01:28 Karrie discusses her family history. Her maternal grandfather was born in 1891 in Lithuania. He came to South Africa in 1914 to escape the military. Her maternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Lithuania. Her paternal grandfather was born in 1888 in Poland. Her paternal grandmother, whose parents came from Lithuania, was born in London in 1893.
03:54 Karrie discusses her father's career as a civil rights lawyer. She discusses her father's role as a founding member of the Liberal Party in South Africa.
06:35 Karrie discusses the impOHt her father's political OHtivism had on her family. She offers examples to illustrate the unique situation in her home while growing up (e.g. political meetings, fear of her father's imminent arrest, visits from political prisoners).
08:26 Karrie offers her impressions of the position taken by the greater Jewish community in South Africa.
09:27 Karrie explains why she and her siblings attended independent schools.
11:00 Karrie discusses her family's involvement in the Jewish community and Jewish prOHtice.
13:15 Karrie discusses how her parents stressed the importance of education and viewed education as a means of leaving South Africa. She discusses the education paths of her siblings as well as her own. Karrie received her teaching qualifications at Cambridge and earned a master's degree in administration planning and social policy at Harvard.
15:34 Karrie lives in Canada. Her sister lives in London. Her brother opted to return to South Africa.
16:38 Karrie relates an anecdote that compares her current situation of seeing her mother once a year with Black workers in South Africa who saw their children once a year.
17:48 Karrie explains that both her sister and brother were unable to return to South Africa for a period of time. In her sister's case it was due to her political activity; in her brother's case, it was due to his refusal to serve in the military.
18:55 Karrie discusses her "charmed" life growing up.
20:54 Karrie discusses her teaching qualifications and first teaching position at an independent school for mixed-race students.
Part 2:
00:56 Karrie discusses her experience at Harvard. Specifically, she mentions a friendship.
06:09 Karrie explains why her parents preferred that she not return to South Africa.
07:09 Karrie relates the story of finding a job at Milton Academy in Boston following graduation.
Part 3:
00:00 Karrie explains how she decided to move to Toronto.
03:45 Karrie explains how she became engaged and married to Clive Lovett in 1979. She explains the factors that contributed to the end of their four-year marriage.
05:16 Karrie discusses her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Branksome Hall.
12:59 Karrie describes meeting and marrying Michael Weinstock. Michael has three children from a previous marriage. Karrie and Michael have one son together.
15:20 Karrie explains how Peter Oliver, a prominent South African-born Toronto philanthropist and businessman, arranged to fund and build an independent school, the Get-Ahead Project School in rural South Africa. She explains her involvement with the project and the connection with Branksome Hall, Rose Avenue Public School, a high-needs school in Toronto, and the Get-Ahead Project School in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Karrie continues to describe the inter-school program that has been set up for students at Branksome Hall, a school in Jamestown; Toronto, and the Get-Ahead school.
02:26 Karrie discusses her role on the board of the Leacock Foundation and her opportunity to further the inter-school program. She cites an example of how they contributed to the Get-Ahead school.
04:17 Karrie reminisces about times when she felt Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

A Triangle of Hope

A Packed Suitcase by the Door

A Charmed Existence

Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Caplan was born on 4 February 1888, in Russia, to David and Ida Caplan. He settled in Canada in 1905. He married Sophie (née Gold) in 1910 and had four children: Arthur, Harold, Leonard and Evelyn (Herschorn).
Isadore was president of I. Caplan Limited, his realty company, which was located in the Caplan Building on Duncan Street. He was a founding member of Shaarei Shomayim Congregation and was on the board of directors for the Toronto Talmud Torah and the Mount Sinai Hospital. He was president of the Hebrew Free Loan Association of Toronto, and was affiliated with other organizations such as the Jewish Home for the Aged, Baycrest Hospital, the Primrose Club and the Mount Sinai Lodge AF & AM.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Caplan, which was used in the 1967 edition of the Who's Who in Canadian Jewry.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jacob Egit was born 27 August 1912, in Poland, the son of Moses and Shindel Egit. He married Clara (née Schwartzbard) and had three children: Mary (Betel), Ryszard and Mark.
After completing his schooling in Poland, he became a journalist and was a staff member of the Polish and Jewish press and active in communal work in pre-war Poland. After the Second World War, Egit became associated with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRA) and the Joint Distribution Committee, and took part in the rehabilitation of Jewish persons from DP camps. He later became director of a book publishing firm.
In 1958 he came to Toronto with his family and became the associate executive director of the Israel Histadrut Campaign, a member of the Speakers Bureau of the Canadian Jewish Congress, secretary of the Organization of the Jews from Poland and a member of the Executive of the Toronto Jewish Cultural Association.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Jacob Egit.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1965]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Green was born 22 September 1898, in Poland, the son of Younison and Rivka Green. He married Toby (née Goldman) and had three children: Goldie, Carl and Jerry.
Green was an active member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was the past president and secretary of the Ostrovtzer Congregation; president of the Adeth Israel Congregation in Oshawa; president of the Radomer Mutual Benefit Society; founder and secretary of the Radomer Co-operative Credit Association Ltd.; founder and treasurer of the Canadian Polish Farband; executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress Board; national recording secretary of the United Radomer Relief, USA and Canada; founder of the Warsaw Lodzer; founder of the Toronto branch of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society; founder of Beth Radom Congregation, and an active Israel Bonds salesman.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
30
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sarah (née Rawet) Mendly was born to Shapsa and Feiga Rawet. The family immigrated to Canada sometime around 1926. Sarah was the president of the Toronto Chapter of the B’nai Brith Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Herzl Zion Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital. Sarah Mendly was the wife of photographer, Gordon Mendly. She died on 31 December 1992.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Sarah Mendly in her husband's studio on College Street.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
David Green was born in 1897, in Kaminka, Poland, the son of Reb Chaim Shochet. In 1913, he immigrated with his family to Toronto, at the age of sixteen. Three years later he married Tilly (née Litowitz) and had three children: Hyman, Beulah and Esther.
Green was an active member of several Jewish organizations and clubs, such as the Palestine Lodge, and was president of the Hebrew National Association (Folks Farein), president of Beth Lida Congregation, vice-president of the Mount Sinai Cemetery Association, vice-president of the Jewish Public Library, vice-president of the College Memorial Chapel , vice-president of the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home, and was on the board of directors of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. Green died on 13 May 1977.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of David Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
35
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Harry Posen was born in 1908, in Pinsk, Poland, to Yakov Shleime and Ethel (née Stravietz) Posenitsky. He was married to Blanche (née Cohen) Spiegel Posen and had three children: Karen (Davidman), Stephen, and David. Blanche also had two other children from a previous marraige: Barry Spiegel and Joy (née Spiegel) Cohen. Harry Posen was the co-owner of a dental laboratory named Posen and Furie. He was a member of Holy Blossom Temple and Ontario Men's O.R.T. He died on 20 May 1985.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Harry Posen.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 48
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
48
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Kalmen Wagner was born on 12 October 1892, in Ostrowiec Swietokrzyski, Poland. He was married to Bina (née Wagner) and had three children: Harry, Sam and Charlie Goldman. Wagner was executive director of the Toronto Poalei Zion, and was active in Israel Histadrut. Wagner died on 16 August 1972, at the age of 79.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Kalmen Wagner.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 49
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
49
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Kurt Weinberg was born in Frankfurt on Mein, Germany in 1925, the son of Herman and Frieda (née Julich) Weinberg. In May 1939, he escaped to Manchester, England from Germany on the Kinder Transport. In 1946, he married his ex-wife, Miriam (née Reuben) and together they had one daughter, Lynda (Crayston). In 1949, Weinberg immigrated to Toronto with his family and attended the School of Social Sciences at the University of Toronto.
Weinberg has held several positions with Jewish communal organizations such as: the Zionist Organization of Canada, Central Region; the United Israel Appeal campaign in Ontario; Education Planning Committee of the United Jewish Welfare Fund of Toronto; campaign secretary of the United Jewish Appeal of Metropolitan Toronto; and executive director of the Jewish National Fund of Canada, Central Region for over nineteen years.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Kurt Weinberg.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-3-2
Material Format
sound recording (electronic)
Physical Description
1 audio recording : mp3
Date
[ca. 1982]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one audio recording of an oral history interview conducted by Mike Culiner with his father Harry Culiner. The interview was conducted in San Francisco in the early 1980s. In the interview Harry describes his early life in Russia and in the Russian army, his immigration to Canada and early life here.
Custodial History
The original cassette tapes are in the possession of Jill Culiner, the granddaughter of Harry and niece of Mike. Jill is the daughter of Jack Culiner. She digitized the cassette tape and brought the digitial file into us.
Administrative History
Harry was born around 1885 in Privitnoye (Russia). Around 1904 he went into the Russian army and soon after immigrated to Ontario. He initially worked on the railway in South Porcupine and Cochrane. Around 1918 he moved to St. Catharines and eventually moved from there to the Junction area of Toronto. He opened a menswear shop at 2996 Dundas Street West and lived above the shop. He married Milder Culiner and they had four children together: Alex (b. 1911), Jack (or John) (1913-2013), Norman (b. around 1915), and Mike (b. around 1917). Harry passed away in 1985 or 1986.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Culiner, Harry
Places
Russia
South Porcupine, Ont.
Cochrane, Ont.
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2014-1-17
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1930-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting the immigration and settlement of Max Smith (Szmidt, Szmit, Szmita) and Pearl (nee Apelbaum?) Smith and their family. Included are Polish identification papers and correspondence with Canadian immigration officials. Also included is correspondence relating to Alexander Najmanowicz.
Custodial History
The records were found by UJA Federation employee Leanne Campbell while she was cleaning out her office for a move. She believes the records belonged to someone who had her office before her. The original owner/source of the records is unknown.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: Polish and English.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Smith, Max
Smith, Pearl
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-2-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
[1946?]-1951
Scope and Content
Accession includes an undated document describing immigration prospects following the Second World War and the anti-immigration sentiment. The document was published by an unknown group "interested in combating race-hatred and anti-Semitism and on strengthening the unity between the groups which make up the people of Canada". In addition, there is a copy of a confidential letter dated February 14, 1951 listing immigrants identified as skilled workers and selected by overseas Canadian immigration officials under the auspices of the Settlement Branch to settle in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. These immigrants were to arrive in Halifax on the above noted date of on board the SS Staveangerfgord.
Custodial History
File discovered while processing CJC fonds 17.
Use Conditions
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-11-13
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1993-1998
Scope and Content
Accession consists of meeting minutes of the Southern African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC). The earliest minutes are from 8 May 1993; the latest minutes are from 12 January 1998.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Southern African Jewish Association of Canada
Places
Ontario
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-11
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-4-11
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1923-1930
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records doumenting Sarah Clodman's immigration to Canada. Included is Clodman's Certificate of Naturalization; Clodman's passport from the USSR; and landing card from Clodman's immigration to Canada as well as a Red Star Line Baths inspection card containing a final inspection stamp given in Antwerp.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2019-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 certificate
Date
Oct. 2005
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one citation for citizenship from the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, awarded posthumously to Eugene Winter for community service settling Hungarian Jewish refugees.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Winter, Eugene, 1910-1995
Places
Canada
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 37; Series 4; Item 15
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gilbert Studios fonds
Al Gilbert portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
37
Series
4
Item
15
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1970]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 11 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Nat Hennick was born in Poland to Molly and William Hennick. The family immigrated to Canada shortly after his birth. Nathan Hennick was a member of Beth Tzedec Synagogue.
Scope and Content
Photograph of Mr. Nat Hennick.
Name Access
Hennick, Nat
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Related Material
see Photo #51 for Irving Hennick
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 1541
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
1541
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1927
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Halifax (N.S.)
Accession Number
1978-4-9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4760
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4760
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1904
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w
Notes
For details, please see accession record.
Name Access
Alexandroff, Boris
West Toronto
Junction
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1989-3-4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 2529
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
2529
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[1908 or 1909]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Abraham Walerstein came from Europe alone. This photo was taken to send back to his family.
Notes
Photo by Wilfrid Joron, 69 St. Lawrence St., Montreal.
Name Access
Walerstein, Abraham
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Montréal (Québec)
Accession Number
1981-2-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 17; Series 5-3; File 210
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
Community Relations Committee series
Anti-Semitism Cases sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
17
Series
5-3
File
210
Material Format
textual record
Date
1964
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of correspondence regarding Boris Sperberg, an immigrant to Canada from Russia who allegedly informed on Jews to the NKVD in Russia.
Notes
Previously processed and cited as part of MG8 S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 3773
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
3773
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1917]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative)
Admin History/Bio
Louis Rottenberg enlisted in the Queen's Own Rifles on 3 September 1915. At that time, he had been living with his family at 10 Denison Avenue and working as a clerk at a post office. It is uncertain as to when his brother enlisted.
Scope and Content
Item is in the form of a portrait postcard of Louis and Joe Rottenberg in the First World War uniforms. It was likely sent to their sibling and is inscribed "your brother's Joe & Louis."
Name Access
Canada. Canadian Armed Forces. Queen's Own Rifles of Canada
Rotenberg, Joe
Rotenberg, Louis
Subjects
Brothers
Portraits
Soldiers--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1985-7-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2016-11-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-11-10
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
9 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 19 MB
586 KB of textual records
Date
[2015?]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 9 digital photographs of Daniel Hoffman, owner of The Cutting Veg, teaching urban farming with the Global Garlic Project, and planting onions and garlic. Also included is one electronic textual document depicting The Cutting Veg's mission statement, issued as promotional material.
Administrative History
The Cutting Veg (TCV) is an eco-social enterprise rooted in organic farming. TCV runs four programs aimed at cultivating personal, social, environmental, and economic health. They cultivate multiple acres of mixed vegetables, making organic food more accessible to vegetable lovers of Southern Ontario. In addition to produce sales, TCV runs the “Global Garlic Project.” Specifically, they grow approximately 20 varieties of garlic from around the world, including Polish, Persian, Italian, Russian, Korean, and Israeli. TCV also provides Food Coaching Services, which offers garden & composting project support, agri-business training, food-based workshops, and part-time farming internships. Finally, TCV offers one-on-one “Wellness Counselling” for individuals who want to take steps forward with their health and happiness. Collectively, these programs are helping TCV towards the achievement of its quadruple bottom line: Personal health, Social health, Environmental health, and Economic health. TCV is owned and managed by Daniel Hoffmann. Daniel is an Organic Farmer, Social Worker (BSW), Counsellor, and has been farming in B.C. and Ontario since 2000.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: The textual record is in a graphic file format but is a document.
Subjects
Agriculture
Education
Name Access
Hoffmann, Daniel
The Cutting Veg (Sutton, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-12-63
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record
Physical Description
19 photographs : col. (jpgs) ; 72 MB
1 folder of textual records
Date
[2014?]-2016
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 19 digital photos of Shoresh activities including beekeeping, farming, the Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Maxie's Garden in Kensington Market, a map of Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and gardening at Baycrest. Also included is a copy of Shoresh 2016 Year in Review.
Administrative History
Shoresh is a grassroots Jewish environmental organization in Southern Ontario. They exist to nurture a regional Jewish community that sees environmental ethics as a core element of Jewish identity, and is actively committed to responsible stewardship of the earth. They do this through educational programs that link Jewish texts and teachings with experiences of awe and wonder of the natural world; leadership opportunities that invest in the next generation of Jewish environmental leaders; and responsive action including environmental advocacy and the production of sustainable products that enrich Jewish life. They operate out of Shoresh’s Kavanah Garden in Vaughan, Bela Farm in Hillsburgh, and through schools, synagogues, camps, and community organizations throughout the Greater Toronto Area.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: There is a PDF version of image #19 of Bela Farm
Subjects
Agriculture
Food
Name Access
Shoresh (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-7-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
41 photographs : b&w and col. (1625 kb jpgs) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1932-2013
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Latchman Triplets. Included are family photographs of Donald, Marvin and Victor Latchman, a family portrait taken at the wedding of Philip and Sally Latchman, class photos, summer camp photos, and images of the triplets' 75th and 80th birthdays (5 November 2013).
Identified in photographs are: Donald and Annette Latchman, Victor and Rosalie Latchman, Marvin and Shirley Latchman, Philip and Sally Latchman, Morris Latchman, Vera Latchman Berrin, Mari Latchman Lipton, Irv Lipton, and Belle Latchman.
Textual records include Beth Sholom Bulletin June-August 1997, Beth Sholom Brotherhood Ball and Installation 1971, photocopies of news paper articles about the triplets, class photos and letter regarding payment of King's Bounty.
Administrative History
Philip and Sally (Sugarman) Latchman were married in 1932. In November 1933, Sally gave birth to identical triplets Donald, Marvin and Victor. In celebration, they were sent the King's Bounty of 3 British pounds. The boys were interviewed every year on their birthday by Toronto newspapers until they decided to stop the publicity. The family lived in the Bloor-Markham area until the boys were 11. The family then moved to Montclair Avenue where the boys attended Forest Hill Public School. They had their bar-mitzvahs at the Hebrew Men of England Synagogue. The triplets' father, Philip Latchman was a founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue. Donald Latchman was on the board and Rosalie Latchman was active in the congregation.
Philip and his younger brother Morris Latchman started Federal Farms Limited in 1948 on 150 acres of Holland March in Brantford, Ontario. They grew vegetables: potatoes, carrots, celery and rutabegas. They also had a potato chip company Mad Hatter Snack Foods which was Kosher for Passover. Federal Farms Ltd. went public in 1961 and Loblaws bought 51% of the shares.
Donald attended Ryerson business school and founded Latchman Insurance Brokers. He married Annette Bachst, a Holocaust survivor who grew up in New York.
Marvin attended Ryerson business school then worked for Federal Farms at the Ontario Food Terminal. Later he became a real estate broker. He married Shirley Wolkofsky.
Victor worked on the family farm and at Federal Fruit Company at the Ontario Food Terminal. Victor took a business course at Shaw's Business School. In 1966 he bought Taylors shoes, a business at 2934 Dundas Street. West started in 1920 by Sid Taylor. Victor helped start the Junction Business Improvement Association and was twice President of Junction Gardens BIA. He retired in 2009. Victor and Rosalie Greenspan (d. 2014) were married at Beth Sholom in 1958 by Rabbi David Monson. Their children are Howard, and Faith and Mitchell Sherman. Their grand-children are Matthew, Jennifer and Russell Sherman. Victor and Rosalie were honoured at Beth Sholom Synagogue on 26 October 2013 for their 55th wedding anniversary.
In 2012 at age 78, the triplets believed themselves to be the oldest male identical triplets alive in Canada.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
RELATED MATERIALS NOTE: Federal Farms Limited fonds at Simoce Country Archives. ASSOCIATED MATERIALS NOTE: See accession 2016-12\45 (Victor Latchman) and 2002-10\66 (Morris Latchman).
Subjects
Agriculture
Families
Name Access
Latchman, Donald
Latchman, Marvin
Latchman, Victor
Places
Brantford (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1984 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk for Israel 1984 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-10
Material Format
graphic material
object
Date
Mar. 1984-June 1984
Physical Description
11 photographs (8 negatives) : 24 x 20 cm and 6 x 6 cm
1 hat
Admin History/Bio
The 1984 Walk for Israel took place on Sunday, June 3rd, beginning at the Bathurst and Sheppard plaza and ending at the Bathurst JCC. The route was a new one and was 20 kilometres long. As per the usual procedure, walkers handed in their money at the first checkpoint. The Walk chairs this year were Bobby Katz and Larry Shapiro. As in past years, B'nai Brith manned the checkpoints and acted as marshalls in overseeing traffic safety. The Walk this year had all the features that had become tradition: refreshments at the checkpoints, cartoon characters, appearances by public figures, and the grand prize of two El Al tickets to Israel.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Source
Archival Descriptions
50 records – page 1 of 1.

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