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50 records – page 1 of 1.
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 2; Item 36
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
2
Item
36
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Dec. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 12 x 8 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Sydney Wise (1915-2013) was born in Toronto on May 3, 1915. His parents were Anshel (b. 10 Jan 1890) and Esther (nee Weissblum) Wise. Born in Poland, Anshel came to Canada in August 1910 and became a travel agent. They had three children: Lillian (Sharpe), Dr. David K. Wise and Dr. Sydney Wise. Syd attended high school at Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto, graduating in 1931. He then went on to complete his undergraduate education at the University of Toronto.
Syd met his future wife, Mimi (nee Marin) in 1938. Born in Toronto in 1920, Mimi (d. 2004) was the daughter of Joseph and Sonia (nee Stern) Marin. The following year, Sydney moved to the United States to begin his medical internship at the Columbus Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mimi stayed behind in Toronto and continued her studies at the University of Toronto. In 1941, she graduated with a degree in physiotherapy, although she never practiced. In 1942, Sydney and Mimi married and Mimi joined Syd in the United States. The couple had 2 children, Mark and Joel.
In 1944, Sydney was sent overseas with the United States Army as a Captain in the Medical Corps. After the war Syd and Mimi returned to Toronto where Syd opened his own practice as a pediatrician. After more than 50 years, Syd retired from his medical practice in 1997. Since then, Syd has been an active volunteer at the OJA.
During their marriage, Syd and Mimi traveled to Israel frequently, often as part of Mimi's volunteer commitments with Hadassah. On a trip to Jerusalem in 1969, Syd met and had his picture taken with Prime Minister Golda Meir.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Sydney Wise.
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-1913, (subject)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Mimi Wise fonds (Fonds 16) for further records regarding Syd Wise (including the photo of Syd with Prime Minister Golda Meir).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 2; Item 35
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Jewish military portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
2
Item
35
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Dec. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 10 cm and 12 x 8 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Sydney Wise (1915-2013) was born in Toronto on May 3, 1915. His parents were Anshel (b. 10 Jan 1890) and Esther (nee Weissblum) Wise. Born in Poland, Anshel came to Canada in August 1910 and became a travel agent. They had three children: Lillian (Sharpe), Dr. David K. Wise and Dr. Sydney Wise. Syd attended high school at Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto, graduating in 1931. He then went on to complete his undergraduate education at the University of Toronto.
Syd met his future wife, Mimi (nee Marin) in 1938. Born in Toronto in 1920, Mimi (d. 2004) was the daughter of Joseph and Sonia (nee Stern) Marin. The following year, Sydney moved to the United States to begin his medical internship at the Columbus Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mimi stayed behind in Toronto and continued her studies at the University of Toronto. In 1941, she graduated with a degree in physiotherapy, although she never practiced. In 1942, Sydney and Mimi married and Mimi joined Syd in the United States. The couple had 2 children, Mark and Joel.
In 1944, Sydney was sent overseas with the United States Army as a Captain in the Medical Corps. After the war Syd and Mimi returned to Toronto where Syd opened his own practice as a pediatrician. After more than 50 years, Syd retired from his medical practice in 1997. Since then, Syd has been an active volunteer at the OJA.
During their marriage, Syd and Mimi traveled to Israel frequently, often as part of Mimi's volunteer commitments with Hadassah. On a trip to Jerusalem in 1969, Syd met and had his picture taken with Prime Minister Golda Meir.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Sydney Wise.
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-1913, (subject)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See Mimi Wise fonds (Fonds 16) for further records regarding Syd Wise (including the photo of Syd with Prime Minister Golda Meir).
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1991-1-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
12 cm of mainly textual material
Date
1923-1971
Scope and Content
Accession consists of materials created by Anshel Wise which document his family and travel business. It consists of genealogical information on his family, two ledgers from his business which document transactions and shipping dates, one scribbler which includes information on steamship sailings, one blank letterhead with his company's logo, and a photograph of his fiftieth wedding anniversary.
Administrative History
Anshel Wise emigrated from Poland in 1910 and established his home in Toronto. He opened up a cigar store on Dundas street, which later turned into a travel agency called A. Wise Travel Bureau.
During the course of his career, Anshel helped bring in hundreds of Jews from Europe, primarily Poland using the shipping lines. He spoke many languages and was able to assist the community by providing advice and services in this area. Later in his career after the establishment of the welfare state, he began helping residents of the St. John's Ward by providing advice, finding the required documents that they needed and helping them apply for retirement benefits.
Use Conditions
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wise, Anshel
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1999-11-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1999-11-7
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 20 x 25 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Date
1999
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a group portrait of the University of Toronto Medical School class of 1939 taken at their sixtieth reunion in June 1999. Identified in the top row from the left are Dr. Harold Linton, Dr. Cam Gray, Dr Bernard Laski, and Dr. Dave Rogers. In the middle row from the left are Dr. Jack Birrell, Dr. C. McCulloch, Dr. Roger Barron, Dr. Harold Fine, and Dr. Alan Basset. In the front row from the left are Dr. J. Walmseley, Dr. Sydney Wise, Dr. Charles Sheard, Dr. McQuaid, and Dr. Phil Ryan.
Subjects
Portraits, Group
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 14; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
14
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1965]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 12 cm
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Syd Wax.
Notes
Photograph is by Gordon Mendly Famous Studio.
Subjects
Physicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Hilton and Shirley Silberg
Number
OH 419
Subject
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Occupations
Interview Date
3 Sep. 2015
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
1 hr. 34 min.
Biography
Hilton and Shirley were born in Durban, South Africa in 1951. Although both were involved in the Habonim youth movement, the two did not meet until their first year in pharmacy school. After getting married and serving a brief stint in the military, Hilton left with Shirley on a trip overseas that included Europe and the United Sates, but whose ultimate purpose was the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal.
Upon arriving in Montreal, the couple decided Canada would be a good place to live. By that point, they had resolved that they did not want their children to internalize the racial norms of apartheid South Africa. Cementing their decision was the fact Shirley’s sister was accepted into Canada shortly after the two returned to South Africa.
Hilton and Shirley’s immigration to Canada was complicated by the fact they were regarded by the government as students, not full-fledged pharmacists. When they came to Canada in August 1977, they therefore had to qualify as pharmacists, which they did by attending university while holding down full-time jobs as pharmacy technicians. Once certified, they moved to Dundas, where they opened a series of pharmacies and raised their children.
In 2007, the couple sold their Day Night Pharmacy chain to Rexall Pharma Plus. In 2014 Hilton and Shirley relocated to Toronto and now spend their time between Toronto and Vancouver to be close to their children and grandchildren.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Silberg, Hilton, 1951-
Silberg, Shirley, 1951-
Geographic Access
Dundas (Ont.)
Durban (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:38 Shirley was born in Durban, South Africa in 1951.
00:44 Shirley discusses her family history. Her maternal grandparents came to Durban in early 1800s from England. They married in South Africa. Her paternal grandparents came to Durban from Lithuania in the late 1800s. They married in South Africa. Her father was a physician specializing in physical medicine; her mother worked as his secretary.
03:31 Shirley describes her privileged early home life.
04:26 Shirley attended Hebrew day school.
05:06 Shirley describes her education and involvement in sports.
07:28 Shirley attended the Habonim youth movement.
08:13 Shirley discusses her early memories of politics and apartheid.
09:57 Shirley describes the impact an overseas trip to Europe and Israel had on her.
12:34 Shirley explains that she and Hilton considered immigrating to Canada and Israel. Her sister had immigrated to Canada and her brother had immigrated to England.
13:31 Hilton and Shirley attended the pharmacy school in Durban.
14:48 Hilton and Shirley married and moved to Johannesburg. Hilton completed mandatory service in the army.
15:37 Hilton was born in Durban on 26 October 1951. He discusses his family history. His maternal grandparents came from Lithuania. His mother was born in South Africa. His father's family came from Lithuania. His father was born in Lithuania. Hilton shares a story about his paternal grandmother's voyage from Lithuania to Pretoria with five children. When his parents were married they moved to Durban in the mid-1950s.
17:46 Hilton discusses his parents. His mother was an occasional secretary. His father was initially a tool and diemaker. Later, he worked in business. Hilton notes that his father was a semi-professional football player.
20:30 Hilton explains that his mother had a strong Jewish identity, but was not religious.
21:06 Hilton discusses his education in public school and Hebrew school.
21:58 Hilton reminisces about his childhood.
23:25 Hilton discusses how he and his sister became competitive ballroom dancers.
25:50 Hilton discusses his bar mitzvah training.
27:02 Hilton was active in the Habonim youth movement.
27:31 Hilton shares his impressions growing up under apartheid. He discusses discrimination, restrictions, and censorship.
30:33 Hilton discusses his mandatory military service.
36:22 Hilton and Shirley discuss how they met and dated.
37:45 Hilton discusses some of the factors that triggered the couple's decision to leave South Africa.
43:07 Hilton and Shirley describe how they struggled to accumulate money before leaving South Africa.
44:12 Hilton describes the efforts made to secure work and a visa for entry into Canada.
48:31 Hilton and Shirley describe the sentiments that surrounded their departure from South Africa.
49:40 Hilton and Shirley arrived in Canada on 25 August 1977.
50:30 Shirley shares anecdotes about her first experiences with household chores.
54:20 Hilton and Shirley discuss their few acquaintances/contacts when they first arrived in Canada.
55:40 Hilton explains how his outlook has changed since he moved to Canada.
57:41 Shirley describes the challenges of juggling work and pharmacy classes at the University of Toronto. Hilton and Shirley share some examples of cultural differences between Canada and South Africa.
1:01:05 Hilton and Shirley worked as pharmaceutical technicians.
1:03:53 Hilton explains how they became partners in a pharmacy in Dundas, Ontario. Hilton and Shirley discuss how they settled in and were welcomed into the Jewish community.
1:10:05 Hilton and Shirley brought Hilton's two sisters, brother, parents, and Shirley's mother to Canada.
1:11:02 Hilton explains the circumstances that led to a split with his partners. He changed the name of the pharmacy from Amherst Pharmacy to Hilton Pharmacy. He describes the growth of the business.
1:18:00 Hilton describes the expansion and success of the business to five pharmacies.
1:20:12 Hilton discusses his involvement in the Jewish and secular communities in Dundas.
1:20:57 In 2007, the business was purchased by Rexall.
1:21:33 Shirley explains the circumstances that prompted their move to Toronto via Vancouver.
1:23:55 Shirley describes a return visit to South Africa with her two youngest children.
1:25:22 Hilton reminisces about a family trip to London and South Africa in 1980.
1:27:08 Hilton describes his discomfort during a visit to Durban, South Africa in 1986.
1:28:40 Shirley relates an anecdote that occurred during their family trip to South Africa.
1:30:46 Hilton reflects on how much he appreciates being in Canada.
1:32:50 Shirley identifies becoming Canadian citizens as a turning point in their new life in Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

https://vimeo.com/230208590

Immigration Tribulations

Who Has Left Over Matzah Balls?

The First Midnight Store

Accession Number
2004-5-52
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-52
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
14 photographs : b&w (6 negatives) ; 21 x 15 cm or smaller + identification key
Date
1929-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of original and copy photographs and negatives of Syd Wise with his university basketball and vollyball teams, and in England and Germany during his military career with the U.S. Army Medical Corps.In addition there is a photograph of a group of young people at Camp Yungvelt in 1928.
Custodial History
Donated by Sydney Wise.
Administrative History
Dr. Sydney Wise was a paediatrician who volunteered at the Ontario Jewish Archives. He passed away in 2013.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
11 photographs : b&w and sepia toned ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1920] - 1959
Scope and Content
Accesssion consists of Dr. Sydney Wise's class photographs from Orde Street School (ca. 1920) and Jarvis Collegiate Institute (1931). Also included is a photograph of the University of Toronto's Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority (ca. 1935), of which Dr. Wise's wife, Mimi Marin, was a member. There are also class photographs of Dr. Wise's children from Holy Blossom Temple's religious school (1957-1959) and a group photograph of the West Prep Orchestra (1957-1958). Finally, accession contains a photograph from the Marin family's New Year's Eve party (ca. 1927). Identified are Max Enkin (seated at the botton right) and Sonia and Joe Marin (seated and standing behind Enkin).
Custodial History
Records were donated by Sydney Wise
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-8-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-8-2
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
7 photographs : b&w and col. ; 20 x 25 cm on matte 31 x 32 cm or smaller
Date
1934, 1973
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic records related to Mimi Wise's involvement in the Shalom Israel festival and exhibition at Yorkdale Shopping Centre celebrating Israel's twenty-fifth anniversary. Also included is an original photograph of the Alpha Sigma Phi Delta Epsilon fraternity at the University of Toronto from November 1934. Pictured is Syd Wise and his brother David.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Dr. Sydney Wise until they were donated to the Archives on
Name Access
Wise, Mimi, 1920-2004
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 1; Item 21
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
1
Item
21
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1953
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 11 x 8 cm 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Mitchell Kohan was a prominent Toronto internist and cardiologist. He married Lena Kohan in July 1924. Dr. Kohan was also an Associate Professor of Medicine in the University of Toronto and the Chief of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital. The Dr. Mitchell Kohan Scholarship was established in the Faculty of Medicine by Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cohen in his memory, and is awarded annually to a student in the final year who has achieved Honours standing, with an emphasis on excellence in Medicine.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Mitchell Kohan.
Name Access
Schwartz, Sylvia, 1914-1998 (creator)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Family series
Portraits sub-series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 5-1; Item 20
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Family series
Portraits sub-series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
5-1
Item
20
Material Format
graphic material
Date
June 1951
Physical Description
2 photographs: b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 11 x 8 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Isaac Shleser was a doctor of internal medicine. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1937. He was married to Helen Schwartz (d. 3 August 2007), the sister of Sylvia Schwartz, and had two daughters, Jill and Jan. He had five grandchildren, Dean, Natalie, Samantha, Duncan and Douglas, and one greatgrandson, Henry. He died on the 10 July 2007.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Isaac Shleser.
Notes
This negative has two images on it.
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 1; Item 1
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
1
Item
1
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1943
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 12 x 8 cm and 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rose Abromowitz (1908-2001) was born in Toronto in 1908. Her parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptuals. David's father, Shevach, served as the cantor at Adath Israel. Rose's siblings included Murray and Oscar. Several members of the family later changed their surname to Abron during the early 1940s.
Rose studied at the University of Toronto and became a doctor in 1932. She married Harry Lahman. In November 1943, Rose and Harry moved from Toronto to Altanta, Georgia. Rose passed away on January 7, 2001 at the age of 93. She was survived by a son, Jerome. Her obituary stated: "She officially retired in 1990, but continued to see herself as a doctor until the day she died."
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Abron.
Notes
Associated material note: See the New York Public Library's American Jewish Committee and Oral History Library for further holdings.
Name Access
Abron, Rose, Dr., 1908-2001
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See accession 2010-3/1.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 1; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Portraits of Prominent Jewish Torontonians series
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
1
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Feb. 1944
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 12 x 9 cm and 12 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Anna (nee David) Gelber (1907-2007) was born in Palestine in 1907 and passed away November 20th, 2007. Anna received her Doctor of Science from Sorbonne Univeristy in Paris, France and her Doctor of Medicine from the University of Toronto. An obstetrician, at one point she worked in the Medical Department of Toronto's Women's College Hospital. Anna was also a prominent communal worker, active as a member of the National Executive Board of the Canadian Hadassah.
Anna married Eddie Gelber, a prominent communal worker. They had three children, Edna, Lynn and David. She and Eddie travelled significantly between Israel and Toronto during their marriage.
Scope and Content
The item is a portrait of Dr. Anna Gelber.
Name Access
Gelber, Anna, 1907-2007 (subject)
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Related Material
See also Fonds 80, Series 1-1, Item 13 for portrait of Anna's husband, Mr. Eddie Gelber.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 36
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
36
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Murray (Moishe) Reingold was born in 1918. Reingold graduated from the University of Toronto in 1943, although his Canadian Medical Association license was issued as "Dr. Maurice Reingold". Reingold completed his training in thoracic surgery at Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York. Reingold served as a Captain in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps as an MD. He worked as a Specialist in Thoracic Surgery, primarily lung surgery, and a Certified Specialist in General Surgery. He was married to Isabelle Ruth Reingold (nee Rodger) by Rabbi Samuel Sachs in Toronto on Feb 26, 1944, and had two children: Debbie (Hamann) and Bryan. Wife Ruth Reingold worked as a Registered Nurse. Murray Reingold died on 25 December 2000, at the age of 82.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Murray Reingold.
Name Access
Canada. Canadian Army. Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2015-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-1-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1 folder textual records
1 photograph: b&w ; 35 x 25 cm
Date
1899-[ca. 1903]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of Dr. Samuel Lavine's certification from the State Board of Medical Colleges of New Jersey and and the Board of Medical Registration and Examination, State of Ohio. Also included is one photograph believed to be of Samuel and Ida Lavine.
Custodial History
Donor found items among her mother's papers, donor was Samuel Lavine's great-granddaughter.
Administrative History
Dr. Samuel Lavine (1874-1959) was the first Jewish doctor to practice in Toronto. He graduated from Trinity University Medical School in 1899. Understanding that Jewish practitioners had little future in Toronto, he moved to the United States and received his medical certification in New Jersey and Ohio. However, he returned to Toronto one year later and opened an office at John and Adelaide Streets. He was known for making house calls on his bicycle. Dr. Lavine was also part of the Pride of Israel Sick Benefit Society, and became the first Jewish Lodge doctor in 1907. In 1909, he helped found, and later remained active in, the Free Jewish Dispensary. As of 1911 he lived at 159 Beverly Street. After 1922 he lived and practiced at 30 Dunvegan Road. The building was designed by Benjamin Brown. By 1931, Lavine's practice was located at 2 Wells Hill. Around 1903 he married Ida (nee Levy? Levi?) (1880-1958), and they had two daughters, Ruth (Levinson) and Helen (Sterling), and a son Bernard. Helen's husband, Theodore "Ted" Sterling, is said to be the first Jewish stockbroker.
Subjects
Physicians
Name Access
Lavine, Samuel, 1874-1959
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 26
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
26
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1964]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 10 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Irwin Lightman was born on 22 October 1919, in Vienna, Austria. He was the son of Samuel and Sarah Lichtman of Galicia, Austria. On 20 July 1946, he married Selma (née Vise) and together they had three children: Bernard, Ellen and Jonathan. Lightman was a dentist by profession. He was an active supporter of the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Irwin (Litch) Lightman.
Subjects
Dentists
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 16; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Mimi Wise fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
16
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
[ca. 1969]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (jpg)
Scope and Content
This item is an electronic copy of a photograph of Dr. Sydney Wise meeting Prime Minister Golda Meir in Jerusalem on a Hadassah tour to Israel. Dr. Wise is receiving an autographed photo from the prime minister.
Name Access
Meir, Golda, 1898-1978
Wise, Mimi, 1920-2004
Subjects
Prime ministers--Israel
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Jerusalem
Accession Number
2006-9-7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
20 Sep. 1985
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Kalmen Kaplansky
Number
OH 109
Subject
Antisemitism
Human rights
Immigrants--Canada
Labor
Labor unions
Refugees--Canada
Interview Date
20 Sep. 1985
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Phyllis Platnick
Total Running Time
109A: 60 minutes 109B: 6 minutes
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Kalmen was born on 5 January 1912 in Poland. He worked in Montreal as a typesetter and linotype operator. He was active in the labour and human rights movements in Canada. Kalmen served as the director of the Jewish Labour Committee in 1945. In collaboration with the Canadian Jewish Congress, the Canadian government, and trade unions, the Jewish Labour Committee helped Jewish displaced persons immigrate to Canada by securing them employment. Kalman sat on the Refugee Status Advisory Committee for the federal government.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Kaplansky, Kalmen
Platnick, Phyllis
Jewish Labour Committee
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 109 - Kaplansky\OH109_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 109 - Kaplansky\OH109_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky discusses some of the obstacles to the relocation of displaced Jews to Canada after the Second World War. He describes a tripartite proposal involving consultation and cooperation among trade unions, management, and government, which enabled the immigration project.

In this clip, Kalmen Kaplansky explains that bribery, corruption, and perjury were a way of life after the Second World War. He relates anecdotes as an example.

Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Rabbi Dr. Israel Frankel was born 7 March 1909, in Stryj, Galicia to Rabbi Asher Isaiah and Bath Sheva Frankel. He moved to Dublin, Ireland where he was ordained in 1929. He married Faygie (née Steinberg) and together had four children: Bath-Sheba, Joshua, Asher and Esther. In 1950, the family immigrated to Toronto.
Rabbi Frankel was director of Camp Galil, former lecturer at Midrashah L'Morim, on the executive of Mizrachi and Hapoel Hamizrachi and executive director of the Toronto Jewish Public Library. He was the Rabbi at Shaarei Tzedec Synagogue for many years.
Rabbi Frankel died in 1977, at the age of 68.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Rabbi Dr. Israel Frankel.
Name Access
Congregation Shaarei Tzedec (Toronto, Ont.)
Frankel, Israel
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Rabbis
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-11-16
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
Date
1970-1997
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to Rolf Lederer's role with the Canadian Jewish Congress' Chaplaincy Services Committee, JIAS, and Congregation B'nai Torah. The records include meeting minutes and agendas, correspondence, reports, financial records, bulletins, invitations, and pamphlets, In addition, there is one document that lists the founders of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Rolf Lederer until they were donated to the Archives on 22 November 2010.
Administrative History
Dr. Rolf Lederer was born in Hamburg, Germany in 1934. His family immigrated to South Africa in 1936 and Rolf remained there until 1961, earning his medical degree from Cape Town University. After completing his psychiatric training in Edinburgh and Boston, Rolf settled in Toronto in 1968. There he set up private practice as a General Psychiatrist.
After moving to Toronto, Rolf became actively involved in the Jewish community and served on a number of committees. He was on both the local and national board of directors of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society (JIAS) as well as a number of JIAS sub-committees, including the South African Jewish Association of Canada (SAJAC), the Local Case File Committee and the Management Committee.
From 1985 to 1988 Rolf was chairman of the Canadian Jewish Congress’s (CJC) Chaplaincy Services Committee. He was also a member of other CJC committees; including, the Jewish Cultural Council and the Joint Adult Education Committee. In addition, Rolf co-founded the Jewish Genealogical Society (JGS) in 1985 and served as the society’s president from 1987 to 1991. Finally, he was an active member of B’nai Torah Congregation, serving as secretary and first vice-president in the early 1980s
Use Conditions
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Name Access
Lederer, Rolf, 1934-
Source
Archival Accessions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Family series
Recreation sub-series
Family Gathering at the Cottage in Bobcaygeon file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 5-2; File 1; Item 9
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
Family series
Recreation sub-series
Family Gathering at the Cottage in Bobcaygeon file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
5-2
File
1
Item
9
Material Format
graphic material
Date
July 1941
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Isaac Shleser was a doctor of internal medicine. He graduated from the University of Toronto in 1937. He was married to Helen Schwartz (d. 3 August 2007), the sister of Sylvia Schwartz, and had two daughters, Jill and Jan. He had five grandchildren, Dean, Natalie, Samantha, Duncan and Douglas, and one greatgrandson, Henry. He died on the 10 July 2007.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Dr. Isaac Shleser and Leonard Hauser.
Notes
This item has no proofs.
Subjects
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. Isadore M. Cass fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 40
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dr. Isadore M. Cass fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
40
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Date
1909-1995
Physical Description
45 cm of textual records
14 photographs : b&w (8 negatives) ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Isadore M. Cass (1916-1996), a well-known pathologist and practicing mohel--Jewish ritual circumcisor--for the Toronto Jewish community, was born and educated in Toronto, attending the University of Toronto's medical school. After serving with the army during the Second World War, Dr. Cass returned to Toronto to private practice. He began studying pathology in 1953, and performed research at the Ontario Cancer Institute, Connaught Labs and the Ontario Department of Health throughout his career. He was chief of pathology at Ajax and Pickering hospitals for twenty-three years, until his retirement in 1986.
In 1945, Dr. Cass began doing ritual circumcisions and was the first medical doctor in Toronto to do so. He performed over 40,000 circumcisions throughout Canada and the eastern United States and trained many physicians to perform them as well.
Dr. Cass was a member of the following organizations: New York Academy of Sciences; the Academy of Medicine, Toronto; the Israel Medical Association; General Wingate Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion; and many other associations and societies.
Dr. Cass studied Torah under Rabbi Jacob Gordon and was a Torah reader at Goel Tzedec Synagogue and later, Beth Tzedec. He also studied and taught Torah throughout his life, chairing the Canadian Jewish Congress' Tanach study group for many years, and leading weekly Gemara classes at Beth Tzedec. He belonged to Shaarei Shomayim and Beth Lida synagogues, as well as Lubavitch. In 1987, Dr. and Mrs. Cass were honoured as "Couple of the Year" by Machanaim, The Network of Educational Institutions in Kiryat Gat, Israel, for their great contributions to this charity over the years.
Dr. Cass was married to Miriam Cass and they had four daughters: Sharon, Hylah, Judy, and Elaine. He had four brothers: the late Rabbi Samuel Cass, Harry, Al, and Elie (who was a Reform mohel), and two sisters: Miriam Cass and Zelda Fink. He also had seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
Dr. Cass died on January 24, 1996 of cancer.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records relating to the personal and professional life of Dr. Isadore Cass. These records include appointment books documenting circumcisions he performed, correspondence, writings, Tanach study group notes, a Machanaim invitation and programme, prayer books, certificates, memorial cards, and photographs.
Name Access
Cass, Isadore M., 1916-1996
Subjects
Physicians
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Physical Condition
The prayer book is in poor condition and some of the early daytimers are in fair condition.
Related Material
See also the Ontario Jewish Archives' reference news clipping file under "Cass, Dr. Isadore".
Creator
Cass, Isadore M., 1916-1996
Accession Number
1997-5-1
1997-8-2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2004-5-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2004-5-9
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 12 x 16 cm and 13 x 18 cm
Date
[ca. 1915?]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of an original and copy photograph of Sydney Wise's bris, May 1, 1915, and a Wladowsky family photograph.
Administrative History
Dr. Sydney Wise was a volunteer at the Ontario Jewish Archives. He passed away in January 2013.
Descriptive Notes
An identification key is provided.
Subjects
Berit milah
Families
Volunteers
Name Access
Wise, Sydney, 1915-2013
Wladowsky, Bernard, 1870-1963
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
John Furedi
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
John Furedi
Number
OH 78
OH 79
Subject
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945)
Immigrants--Canada
Farmers
Communities
Synagogues
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1976
Quantity
4 cassettes (2 copies)
3 WAV files
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
OH78_001: 45.20 minutes OH78_002: 45.30 minutes
Conservation
Copied to cassette in August 2003
Copied to digital file in December 2013
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
John Furedi was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1925. During the Second World War, John was drafted into the Hungarian Labour Service System (Munkaszolgalat). After the Nazi occupation of Hungary in March 1944, John was deported to the Kistarcsa transit camp. Between 1945 and 1948, John travelled throughout Europe and returned to Budapest during the takeover of Hungary by the Communists. The revolution and anti-Jewish sentiment forced many Jews, including John and his wife Stephanie, to flee Hungary. In 1956, they immigrated to Canada and lived in Montreal for one year. In 1958, with the aid of a six-thousand-dollar loan provided by the Jewish Colonization Association, John became the first Jewish chicken farmer to settle in Beamsville, Ontario. John went on to become an active member of Beamsville's Jewish community and participated in the establishment of the community’s first congregation in 1966.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Furedi, John
Jewish Colonization Association
Geographic Access
Beamsville (Ont.)
Hungary
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 78 - Furedi\OH78_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 78 - Furedi\OH78_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-3
Material Format
moving images
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
July 1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one DVD copy of a July 1985 interview of Dr. Stephen Speisman by the donor, recorded at the TJC Archives. Dr. Speisman discusses his family's connections with the Gold family because of their common background in Ostrow, Poland. He also talks about the socialist views of many Jewish immigrants, the factors influencing their desire to emigrate in the First World War era, their early experiences learning English, the reasons for Anglicizing their names, and the cultural values that Polish Jews brought to Canadian life.
Custodial History
DVD copy created from original videocassette created by the donor.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions: Any re-use requires written permission of the donor.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Socialism
Name Access
Speisman, Stephen A., 1943-
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Monty Grunebaum and Barney Sher
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
6 Sep. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Monty Grunebaum and Barney Sher
Number
OH 438
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South AFrica
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
6 Sep. 2016
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
OH 438 part 1: 22 min.
OH 438 part 2: 22 min.
OH 438 part 3: 20 sec.
OH 438 part 4: 14 min.
OH 438 part 5: 22 min.
OH 438 part 6: 11 min.
Biography
Monty Grunebaum and Barnie Sher are two of the founding members of Kehillat Shaarei Torah, a Modern Orthodox shul located on Bayview Avenue in North York. Monty, who immigrated to Canada in 1977, says that the impetus for starting the shul derived partly from South Africans wanting to recreate their memories of Jewish life in South Africa in their new country. A group began to look at different venues in the city and applied for a rabbi. Because many of the South Africans who immigrated to Canada were of modest means, it was a challenge raising funds. With the support of the established Toronto community, eventually, the group was able to purchase a property and hire a rabbi. In November 1980, the shul was incorporated as Kehillat Shaarei Torah of Toronto.
Kehillat Shaarei Torah has had four rabbis since its incorporation in 1980. Rabbi Eliot Feldman served the community from 1981 to 1988 and was instrumental in getting the shul established. Rabbi Steven Cohen succeeded Feldman, serving the congregation from 1988 to 1992. Rabbi Reuven Tradburks came next, caring for the community from 1992 to 2009. The current rabbi, Rabbi Joe Kanofsky, has led the community since 2009.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Grunebaum, Monty
Kehillat Shaarei Torah (Toronto, Ont.)
Sher, Barney
Geographic Access
South Africa
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:29 Monty explains the impetus for starting a synagogue for South African Jews in Toronto.
01:37 Monty discusses where he lived in Toronto when he arrived in 1977. He discusses the main locations where South African Jews settled.
02:50 Barnie describes a large presence of South African Jews in the Bayview/York Mills area.
03:11 Barnie discusses the origins of the synagogues in South Africa.
04:14 Barnie discusses the importance of cantorial singing in South African synagogues.
05:20 Barnie describes some of the synagogues and their primary influences from Lithuania and Germany.
06:24 Barnie recounts his first experience at a Toronto synagogue for the High Holidays.
08:13 Monty recounts his first experience at a Toronto synagogue for Rosh Hashanah and how it served as a catalyst to establish a synagogue that would feel more comfortable.
09:47 Barnie describes funeral traditions in South Africa. He contrasts these prOHtices with his personal experience in Toronto.
14:19 Barnie and Monty discuss the early attempts to establish services to meet the needs of their South African Jewish community.
18:21 Barnie highlights the importance of having a separate section in the cemetery in order to maintain South African burial prOHtices.
19:23 Barnie and Monty discuss the role played by Bernard IsaOHs in the formation of the synagogue.
Part 2:
00:00 Barnie discusses some of the earliest founders and promoters of the synagogue: Rabbi Whitty, Kurt Rothschild, Harvey Hecker, ?Bernie Gert. He describes fundraising efforts.
01:19 Monty explains how the property for the synagogue was purchased.
03:23 Barnie describes the OHquisition of the aron kodesh, pews, and prayer books from an Ontario synagogue donation and from membership donations.
04:25 Monty discusses the limited financial resources of new South African immigrants. Financial support for the synagogues came from membership donations.
05:20 Monty notes that the synagogue attrOHted a number of Jews who moved from Montreal.
06:26 Barnie discusses the synagogue's first rabbi, Rabbi Feldman.
07:50 Barnie discusses resistance to the synagogue from Jewish neighbours.
09:36 The synagogue's name, Kehillah Shaarei Torah, was the name of Rabbi Feldman's congregation in SyrOHuse. Barnie and Monty reminisce about Rabbi Feldman.
12:55 The synagogue was incorporated in November 1980.
14:45 Barnie describes the operation of the synagogue before a building was constructed.
19:13 Monty recalls that Beth Tikvah Synagogue lent them Torahs.
19:51 Barnie reminisces about the first Rosh Hashanah in their new building.
20:48 Barnie recounts how the synagogue received a generous donation from the Reichman family.
Part 4:
00:00 Monty lists the rabbis who served the synagogue.
00:26 Barnie recounts a humorous incident about meeting a new rabbi.
02:50 Barnie and Monty discuss Rabbi Tradburks and his contribution to the synagogue and the greater Jewish community in Toronto.
09:29 Barnie discusses an attempt to change the synagogue's direction from Orthodox to Conservative.
10:28 Barnie and Monty continue to reminisce about Rabbi Tradburks.
Part 5:
00:00 Monty discusses Rabbi Joel Kanofsky.
02:40 Barnie identified demographics as a concern for the continuity of the synagogue.
04:50 Barnie continues to discuss membership. Membership has remained relatively steady at a 220-230 family core.
06:00 Barnie and Monty discuss outreOHh methods and various synagogue services, education, and events.
11:00 Barnie discusses some humorous incidents involving their group of four friends, including a Purim skit and a birthday gag.
18:17 Barnie discusses Rabbi Tradburk's involvement in the formation of the Coby Mandel Foundation, a support group for youth in Israel who have lost family members as a result of terrorism.
Part 6:
00:00 Barnie discusses changes that are occurring in the synagogue with a change of demographics and new membership.
02:24 Monty raises concerns about loss of membership.
04:18 Monty lists some programs and services offered in the synagogue, including a youth program.
04:43 Barnie discusses the current status of the synagogue. He cites some of the problems with the existing synagogue (e.g. no elevator, lOHk of parking, no banquet hall).
07:34 Barnie mentions the synagogue on Green Lane, another synagogue with a large South African membership.
08:44 Barnie describes the process of hiring a new rabbi for their synagogue.
Source
Oral Histories

https://player.vimeo.com/video/232091886?

Accession Number
2015-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-12-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.2 m of textual records
ca. 250 photographs : b&w and col.
Date
1776, [191-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of the records related to the life and career of Dr. Fred Wienberg. Included are textual and photographic records documenting his personal and family life, his medial career, scholarly activities, involvement with the Jewish community, his collecting of Judaica, medical antiques and art, and his synagogue involvement. Other items include the Ostrovtzer Mutual Benefit Society minute book and a 1776 letter from Jonas Phillips, a veteran of the American Revolutionary War and an American merchant in New York City and Philadelphia.
Administrative History
Fred Weinberg (1919-2003) was born in Ostrawiec, Poland on July 6, 1919 to Rose and Israel Weinberg. Israel immigrated to Canada in 1920 and his wife and children joined him several years later in March of 1924. The family settled in Toronto where Israel worked in the fur manufacturing business. Israel was a supporter and aficionado of cantorial music as well as a founder of the Associated Hebrew Schools of Toronto and the Ostrovtzer Synagogue on Cecil Street.
Fred completed his primary and secondary education at Clinton Street Public School and Harbord Collegiate. He also attended the Brunswick Talmud Torah, celebrating his bar mitzvah in 1932. Fred decided to pursue a medical career, graduating from the University of Toronto’s medical school in 1944. During his studies he enlisted in the army and completed officers’ training in April 1945, attaining the rank of Captain. During his military career he served in the RCAMC at Camp Borden, Christie St. Hospital and at the Stanley Barracks in Toronto. Towards the end of the war he served as Officer in charge of repatriation of the POWs.
After the war Fred pursued his post-graduate work at Seaview and Bellevue hospitals in New York City from 1946 to 1947 and then moved on to the Children’s and Washington University hospitals in St. Louis, Missouri the following year. He was subsequently accepted as a resident at Sick Kids Hospital in Toronto and was ultimately appointed Chief Resident under the supervision of the internationally renowned paediatrician, Dr. Alan Brown. In 1950, Dr. Weinberg was hired as a physician in paediatrics at Sick Kids Hospital, making him the first Jewish doctor on staff. In addition to his staff responsibilities, he also lectured and was a faculty member at the University of Toronto’s Medical School for many years.
By the mid-point of his career, Dr. Weinberg went on to specialise in Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), delivering lectures and publishing articles in medical journals. He also ran his own practice, which operated from 1950 to 1976, and later become Associate Medical Director of the Child Development Clinic, Neurology Division of Sick Kids until his retirement in 1984. He later continued his service at Sick Kids as a senior staff consultant and ran a specialized practice in Developmental Pediatrics for close to twenty years, which was later situated at 208 Bloor Street West.
Fred married Joy Cherry on December 16, 1952 at Goel Tzedec Synagogue. The couple had four children: Joel (b. 1953), Barry (b. 1955), Sari (b. 1956) and Deena (b. 1961). Throughout his life, Fred was actively engaged in Jewish communal work in a variety of capacities: assisting with the establishment of the United Synagogue Day School during the 1950s; as a fundraiser for the United Jewish Appeal (UJA); and as a participant in two of UJA’s early study missions to Israel in 1960 and 1961. He was also an influential figure within his synagogue, joining the Board of Directors of Beth Tzedec Synagogue during the late 1960s and serving as President from 1972 to 1975.
Fred and his wife Joy also collected Judaica, antiques and artwork. As a physician, Fred developed a passion and expertise in the area of medical antiques. He published articles in both the mainstream and Jewish press on subjects related to Jewish rituals, Judaica and art. He also had a regular column in the Canadian Journal of Diagnosis from 1998 to 2002 entitled “Antique instruments”. Over time, the Weinberg’s assembled a world-class collection of Judaica and became increasingly active in the museum world. Fred assisted in the establishment of Beth Tzedec’s Helene and Rubin Dennis Jewish Museum, contributing items from the couple’s Judaica collection and securing the acquisition of the renowned Cecil Roth collection for the Museum during the early to mid-1960s. As a result of his significant contributions, he was bestowed the title of honourary curator to the Museum. Dr. Weinberg later branched out and assisted with the Koffler Gallery’s Lifecycle exhibition in 1984 as guest curator. The following year, he served as a special presenter and instructor to the docents at the “Precious Legacy” Czech Judaica exhibition at the ROM. The Weinberg’s most significant contribution to the museum world, however, was marked in September of 2000, when they were honoured at the opening of the Dr. Fred and Joy Cherry Weinberg Gallery of Judaica at the ROM, featuring some of their most valuable and treasured pieces.
Dr. Fred Weinberg passed away on October 30, 2003 at 84 years of age. The Weinberg Endowment Fund was established by the family at the University of Toronto’s Jewish Studies Program to honour Fred’s passion for Jewish history, rituals and artefacts. That year the Weinberg family also set up a fund in Fred’s name in support of the Therapeutic Clown Program, a highly visible and successful program within Sick Kids’ Pediatric Division.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Descriptive Notes
Use Conditions Note: Records contain patient names and medical information.
Subjects
Families
Physicians
Societies
Name Access
Weinberg, Fred, 1919-2003
Source
Archival Accessions
Level
Item
ID
Item 770
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
770
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 26 x 21 cm
Scope and Content
This item is studio portrait of Dr. Isadore Goldstick, of London, Ontario.
Notes
Acquired in June 1976.
Reproduction restriction note: Copyright owned by Bill Barrett, London. Please credit upon publication.
Name Access
Goldstick, Dr. Isadore
Subjects
Physicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is not held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
London (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 754
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
754
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[195-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 8 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original portrait of Dr. J. M. Ennis (formerly Enushevsky) of Welland, Ontario.
Notes
Acquired in June 1976.
Name Access
Ennis, Dr. Julius M.
Subjects
Physicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Welland (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 782
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
782
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 18 cm
Scope and Content
This item is an original portrait of Dr. H. O. Singer of Welland, Ontario.
Notes
Acquired in June 1976.
Name Access
Singer, Dr. H. O.
Subjects
Physicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
Welland (Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Dr. Hana Gelber
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1973
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Hana Gelber
Number
OH 13
OH 14
Subject
Antisemitism
Families
Occupations
Interview Date
29 Jul. 1973
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Stephen Speisman
Total Running Time
013 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side One 30 minutes
014 Side Two 30 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Conditional access. Researchers must receive permission from the interviewee or his/her heir prior to accessing the interview. Please contact the OJA for more information.
Biography
Hana Gelber (née David) was born in Safed (Tzfat), Palestine in 1907. She studied sciences at the University of Paris-Sorbonne and prepared her thesis at Hebrew University. She graduated from University of Paris-Sorbonne in 1929. Hana moved to Toronto in December 1929 and married Eddie Gelber in March 1930. Hana and Eddie moved to New York where Eddie was completing his final year at the Jewish Theological Seminary and Hana conducted research at the Rockefeller Institute. They returned to Toronto in July 1930. Hana graduated from Medical School at the University of Toronto in 1934. She completed her medical internship in Palestine. Hana and Eddie lived in Palestine from 1934 to 1939. They returned to Toronto in 1939 where they remained until 1954 at which time they made aliyah. Hana worked at Women's College Hospital until 1954. Hana had three children: Edna, Lynn, and David.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Gelber, Hana
Jewish Theological Seminary of America
Women's College Hospital (Toronto, Ont.)
Geographic Access
New York (N.Y.).
Palestine
Toronto (Ont.)
Tsefat (Israel)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH13_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH14_001_Log.docx
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 13, OH 14 - Gelber\OH14_002_Log.docx
Source
Oral Histories
Level
Item
ID
Item 66
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
66
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1936
Physical Description
1 photograph
Admin History/Bio
Dr. Bernard Manace was a Toronto pediatrician. There is an award in his name at the University of Toronto for a medical student who is undertaking an elective or summer medical experience in Israel.
Scope and Content
Item is a black-and-white photograph at Dr. Bernard Manace's stag party. The photographs depicts a large group of men seated in a dining hall.
Back row, left to right: [Jack Slavens?]; [Trachter?]; [Solway?]; Dr. Louis Kazdan, father of Dr. Manace; Dr. Bernard Manace; Dr. M.A. Pollock; Dr. Harry Leizner; Dr. Charles Markson (Markowitz); Dr. Samuel Norris; Dr. M.K. Bochner; Dr. Bernard Willinsky; Dr. Joseph Gollom; Dr. David Perlman; [unknown]; Dr. Adolf A. Appell; Dr. I.M. Golden; Dr. Jacob Markowitz (at U.of T.); Dr. William Harris; Dr. Samuel Perlman, dentist, brother of David Perlman.
Front row, left to right: Emanuel Pullan; [Ed or Gordon Pullan]; Dr. Lou Harris; Dr. Murray Dyment; Dr. Ben Garfield; Dr. Irwin Smith; Dr. Milton Raymers; Dr. David Eisen; Dr. Gordon Manace; Dr. Nathan Shaul; Dr. Max Sibberman; Dr. Mitchell Cohen; Dr. Jacob Goldstein; Dr. Benjamin Cohen; Dr. Aaron G(lassberg) Volpe; Dr. A.A. Track; Dr. Oscar Lewin; Dr. Harold Taube; Dr. Jacob Pollack; Dr. Maurice Selznick; [unknown]; Mannie Starkman.
Notes
See photo for identification order of front row.
Name Access
Manace, Dr. Bernard
University of Toronto
Slavens, Dr. Jack
Trachter
Solway
Kazdan, Dr. Louis
Pollack, Dr. M.A.
Leizner, Dr. Harry
Markson, Dr. Charles
Norris, Dr. Samuel
Bochner, Dr. M.K.
Willinsky, Dr. Bernard
Gollom, Dr. Joseph
Perlman, Dr. David
Appell, Dr. Adolf
Golden, Dr. I.M.
Markowitz, Dr. Jacob
Harris, Dr. William
Perlman, Dr. Samuel
Pullan, Dr. Emanuel
Pullan, Dr. Gordon
Pullan, Dr. Ed
Harris, Dr. Lou
Dyment, Dr. Murray
Garfield, Dr. Ben
Smith, Dr. Irwin
Raymers, Dr. Milton
Eisen, Dr. David
Shaul, Dr. Nathan
Sibberman, Max
Cohen, Dr. Mitchell
Goldstein, Dr. Jacob
Cohen, Dr. Benjamin
Volpe, Dr. Aaron
Track, Dr. A.A.
Lewin, Dr. Oscar
Taube, Dr. Harold
Pollack, Dr. Jacob
Selznick, Dr. Maurice
Starkman, Mannie
Subjects
Parties
Physicians
Access Restriction
Restricted until April 1984.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 15; File 37; Item 10
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ida Lewis Siegel fonds
Photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
15
File
37
Item
10
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1912
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
The Rycus family were neighbours to the Siegel family when they lived at 136 Elizabeth Street. Hinda Falick (née Swartz) was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Swartz, who were originally from Romania and later lived in Montreal. She married a man named Avrom Falick, who lived in Toronto. Their second daughter Mary, married Goodman Rycus.
Scope and Content
Item is a formal portrait postcard of Dr. and Mrs. Schwab, Marv Rycus and Hinda Falick. Dr. Schwab is wearing a military uniform with a Magen David on his cap.
Standing, left to right: Marv Rycus; Hinda Falick; Dr. Schwab.
Seated: Mrs. Mary Schwab.
Notes
Title taken from notes of Ida Siegel. Her notes also state that Dr. Schwab was part of the medical unit for Palestine, however this is unconfirmed.
There is writing on the back of the photograph that reads: To our friends Mr. and Mrs. Siegal (sic). From Mary and [Arny?].
Subjects
Physicians
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1988-2-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 48; Series 2-4; File 459
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Board of Jewish Education fonds
Executive director series
Teacher files sub-series
Level
File
Fonds
48
Series
2-4
File
459
Material Format
textual record
Date
1971-1973
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing the records
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2003 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
ID
Fonds 67; Series 17-1-29
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
United Jewish Welfare Fund fonds
Annual Campaign series
Walk with Israel sub-series
Walk with Israel 2003 sub-sub-series
Level
Sub-sub-series
Fonds
67
Series
17-1-29
Material Format
multiple media
Date
2003
Physical Description
10 posters (pdf) and other material
Admin History/Bio
In 2003, the Walk with Israel took place on Sunday, May 25th, featuring a brand new 5 kilometre route from Coronation Park at the lakeshore, around downtown Toronto and back to the National Trade Centre at the C.N.E. grounds. The slogan this year was "Together We're Stronger" and more than 20,000 people came out to show their support for Israel. Approximately $500,000 was raised. The Walk culminated in a Festival at the National Trade Centre that had a drumming workshop and a 7-foot Magen David made out of balloons.
Scope and Content
Sub-sub-series contains photographs, a promotional video, two t-shirts, a windbreaker and a hat from the Israel Funwalk of 2001. One t-shirt has the sponsors listed on the back. There is also a royal blue child's hat.
Notes
Physical description note: Includes 74 photographs (jpg), 1 videocassette, 2 t-shirts, 1 windbreaker jacket, 1 hat.
Access Restriction
Records in off-site storage; advance notice required to view.
Physical Condition
The digital photographs in this sub-sub-series are currently housed on original CDs from 2003. They will need to be moved to another medium to extend their lifespan, i.e. server or archival quality disc.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1971
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Esther Volpe and Ida Siegel
Number
OH 161
OH 162
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Nonprofit organizations
Interview Date
4 Jan. 1971
Quantity
2
Interviewer
Eva Kayfetz and Stephen Spiesman
Total Running Time
OH161 Side 1: 47 minutes OH161 Side 2: 47 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Toronto Historical Society lecture
Use Restrictions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Esther Volpe (née Shulman) was born on 24 February circa 1898. As a child, she and her family briefly lived in Romington, Ontario and Havlock, Ontario. Her family later settled in Toronto. In her youth, she participated in the Herzl Girls' Club. She attended University of Toroonto in the Faculty of Arts. She married Dr. Aaron Volpe in 1921. Esther was involved in several Jewish organizations, including the old Mount Sinai Medical Auxillary, Council of Jewish Women, Hadassah, UJA Appeal, JIAS and BBYO and non-Jewish organizations, including Toronto Local Council of Women. She represented the Jewish community of Toronto on the Wartime Price and Trade Board and helped organize the Ontario Food Council.
Ida Siegel (née Lewis) (1885–1982) was born on 14 February 1885 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In 1894, Ida and her family moved to Toronto. On 14 February 1905, Ida married Isidore Hirsch Siegel. They had six children. An extremely active communal leader, Ida helped found Daughters of Zion in 1899, the Herzl Girls Club in 1904 and Hadassah in 1916. In the mid-1920s, Ida established the Mothers' and Babes' Rest Home,a camp for poor women with young children. She helped organize the first free Jewish dispensary in Toronto, which eventually developed into Mount Sinai Hospital. Ida was also very active in womens peace movements, the Toronto Board of Education and the Toronto Bureau (elected to board, 1930-36) of Jewish Education. In 1917, Ida helped to organize Federation of Jewish Philanthropies, which later became the UJA Federation of Greater Toronto.
Material Format
sound recording
Name Access
Volpe, Esther
Siegel, Ida
Kayfetz, Eva
Speisman, Stephen
Hadassah-WIZO
National Council of Jewish Women
Geographic Access
Toronto
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Source
Oral Histories

In 1947, Esther Volpe was elected President of the National Council of Jewish Women. In this clip, Esther discusses how, with the support of the United Welfare Fund, the Canadian Jewish Congress and JIAS, she helped make arrangements for groups of Jewish refugees who settled in Toronto.

In this clip, Esther Volpe explains her involvement in the creation of the "Good Age Club" the first recreational program for Jewish seniors.

In this clip, Ida Siegel relates anecdotes from her childhood growing up in downtown Toronto.

Name
Frank Schleifer
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
29 Jun. 1976
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Frank Schleifer
Number
OH 84
Subject
Canada--Armed Forces
World War, 1939-1945
Recreation
Families
Interview Date
29 Jun. 1976
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Larry Troster
Total Running Time
OH84_001: 45.20 minutes OH84_002: 11.00 minutes
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Frank was born on 4 January 1916 in Toronto. His parents were Charles Schleifer and Mary Schleifer (née Noble). At the age of three, his family moved to Sturgeon Falls, Ontario. In 1922, the family moved to Brantford, Ontario, where his mother's family lived. Frank left school at age sixteen to work at the family Cigar and Soda Fountain store when his father became ill. He opened Frank’s Billiard Parlour from 1941 to 1946. He was drafted into the army in 1943, where he served in the artillery and infantry. He started to work in Unemployment Insurance with the federal government. Frank married Bertha (née Maltifer ?) in 1937. They had one son, Charles, born in 1947. As a youth, Frank was involved with AZA (B'nai Brith youth organization). He was a member of B'nai Brith and served on the executive of the synagogue in Brantford.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Schleifer, Frank
Troster, Larry
Geographic Access
Brantford
Sturgeon Falls
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 84 - Schleifer\OH84_001_Log.pdf
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 84 - Schleifer\OH84_002_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Frank Schleifer shares some early memories of growing up in Brantford, Ontario. He mentions some of the original Jewish families who settled in Brantford.

In this clip, Frank Schleifer describes his involvement in a variety of Jewish activities and groups during his youth, including AZA, summer camp and baseball.

Name
Dr. Vivian Rakoff
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
24 Nov. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Dr. Vivian Rakoff
Number
OH 440
Subject
Canada--Emigration and immigration
Jews--South Africa
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
24 Nov. 2016
Interviewer
Naomi Raichyk
Total Running Time
OH 440 part 1: 31 min.
OH 440 part 2: 3 min.
OH 440 part 3: 2 min.
OH 440 part 4: 21 min.
Biography
Vivian Morris Rakoff was born on 28 April 1928 in Cape Town but was quickly whisked off to Port Nolloth, a small town on the northwest coast of South Africa, where he spent his earliest years. And while Port Nolloth was home to less than a dozen Jewish families, his mother would still braid challah every Friday night.
The family moved to Cape Town when Vivian was six. At age eleven, he had a bruising encounter with apartheid that left a strong impression on him. Having innocently boarded a bus set aside for Black South Africans, he was thrown off by the conductor who told him, “You can’t come here!” Afterwards, he told his aunt he was not going to live in South Africa.
After completing a degree at the University of Cape Town, Vivian set sail for England, where he was planning to study English at Oxford. Instead, he followed friends down to Marseilles where he met Yiddish-speaking Holocaust survivors waiting to set sail for Israel. The encounter was a pivotal one and led Vivian to journey to Israel, where he lived on kibbutz for a year.
After losing his passport, Vivian returned to South Africa, where he completed a master’s degree in psychology. He then travelled to England, this time staying for more than eight years. He studied medicine at University College London and enjoyed the city’s theatres and museums. After completing his degree, he decided it was time to see his parents so he returned once more to South Africa.
While in South Africa, Vivian met a friend who suggested he enroll in McGill University’s psychiatry program. Vivian thus set sail yet again, this time with wife and ten-month-old baby. After an eighteen-day journey, the family arrived in Montreal, where Vivian did his residency. Residency complete, he accepted a job offer in Toronto, where he stayed for the rest of his career, serving as chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and as the namesake for the Rakoff Centre for Positron Emission Tomography. In 2015, the Government of Canada appointed him a member of the Order of Canada in recognition of his contributions to psychiatry as well as for his role in founding the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health.
Vivian died on 1 October 2020. He was survived by his wife Gina Shochat-Rakoff, son Simon, daughter Ruth, and grandchildren Micah, Amit, Sasaf, and Zoe.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Rakoff, Vivian Morris, 1928-2020
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
Montréal (Québec)
Port Nolloth (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:29 Vivian discusses the immigration of his father's family to South Africa. His grandfather left Lithuania around the turn of the twentieth century. His grandmother and her children joined him in South Africa. Vivian lists the members of the family.
04:24 Vivian discusses the immigration of his mother's family. His mother, who was born in Chicago, came to South Africa in 1914.
05:00 Vivian's family settled in Port Nolloth. Vivian discusses the economy of the region. He discusses his father's businesses and marriage to his mother, Bertha. Vivian is one of four children.
06:48 Vivian was born on 28 April 1928 and lived in Port Nolloth for his first six years.
07:35 Vivian shares memories of growing up Jewish in Port Nolloth. He recounts anecdotes concerning his father's Zionist leanings.
09:40 Vivian describes his family's Jewish observance and shares memories from his youth.
12:30 Vivian discusses the impact of Zionism in his personal life. He describes his involvement with HaShomer HaTzair and travelling to Israel.
13:13 Vivian describes synagogues in Cape Town. He discusses his Jewish education after his family moved to Cape Town when he was six.
14:26 Vivian discusses the Jewish lives of his grandparents in Lithuania. He discusses the influence of the Haskalah (Jewish Enlightenment) and the rise of Zionism.
17:17 Vivian discusses the impact of South African politics on his life. He recalls a poem he wrote for his Zionist youth magazine. He recalls how an incident from his childhood that highlights the oppressive nature of the apartheid regime. The incident influenced his decision to leave South Africa.
21:04 Vivian describes the circumstances that triggered his decision to go to Palestine in 1947. His plan to study in England was interrupted when he decided to join a group of displaced persons in Marseilles who were travelling to Palestine. He remained there for a year.
24:26 Vivian describes his educational studies in South Africa and England.
25:27 Vivian expounds on living in London for eight years.
28:15 Vivian discusses his decision to come to Canada to study Psychiatry at McGill University.
29:18 Vivian describes his journey by steamship to Canada with his wife and ten-month-old baby.
30:13 Vivian discusses his impressions of South Africa when he returned from England.
Part 2:
00:13 Vivian discusses early memories of living in Montreal and how reality differed from expectations. He worked as a psychiatry resident at the Jewish General Hospital, but his wife, also a doctor, was unable to work. He describes a feeling of disappointment when they were not invited for High Holidays.
Part 3:
00:00 Vivian explains that he had decided to leave Montreal in 1967. He discusses Expo 67 and their many visitors.
Part 4:
00:00 Vivian discusses how his first job offer in Toronto at St. Michael's Hospital in 1967 was retracted due to antisemitism. He was then offered a position as director of postgraduate education in the psychiatry department.
01:00 Vivian describes some of the early challenges faced by his family when they arrived in Canada such as financial challenges and antisemitism.
02:28 Vivian and family move to a home on Ridgewood Road where they remain for twenty-three years.
03:00 Vivian contrasts his early experiences in Toronto with those in Montreal.
04:07 Vivian's children attended Bialik Hebrew Day School.
04:16 Vivian describes his family's Jewish observance.
04:52 Vivian explains that his primary connection to the South African Jewish community in Toronto is through relatives.
05:25 Vivian continues to discuss his Jewish observance.
06:25 Vivian discusses some of his family members who came to Toronto.
08:00 Vivian discusses his research concerning the challenges faced by children of Holocaust survivors. He continues to discuss his professional and literary writing.
09:5 Vivian outlines his professional positions: director of postgraduate education, chief of psychiatry at St. Michael's Hospital, chief of psychiatry and professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto.
10:25 Vivian highlights a personal achievement concerning bringing a positron emission scanner to the Clark Institute (CAMH).
11:50 Vivian discusses his interest in art.
13:17 Vivian discusses some of the challenges encountered by new immigrants.
14:30 Vivian addresses his own decision to immigrate to Canada.
15:41 Vivian addresses his Canadian identity.
15:58 Vivian describes a trip with his grandchildren to Port Nolloth.
17:36 Vivian shares some of his lasting memories of Cape Town.
19:08 Vivian discusses the common destinations for South African Jewish immigration.
20:12 Vivian discusses his experience as an immigrant of Canada.
Source
Oral Histories

Braiding challah with my mother

Montreal was Hostile

On Survivors

Receiving the Order of Canada

Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 10; Item 18
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Dorothy Dworkin fonds
Level
Item
Fonds
10
Item
18
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1930]
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 25 x 19 cm or smaller
Scope and Content
Item is a photograph of a Dr. Simon Fines using a stethoscope to listen to the heartbeat of a little boy at old Mount Sinai Hospital. Dorothy Dworkin, a nurse, and Ephraim Frederick Singer, President, are standing behind them from left to right. The photograph appears to have been taken for publicity purposes.
Notes
Stamp on verso: Daylight Studio Photographer, 361 Queen St. East, Toronto.
Name Access
Mount Sinai Hospital
Singer, E. F.
Singer, Ephraim Frederick
Subjects
Hospitals
Nurses
Physicians
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
2005-4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2016-3-60
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
ca. 5 cm of textual records
2 photographs : col. & b&w ; 10 x 15 cm and 5 x 4 cm
Date
1972-2010, predominant 1977-1983
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual and graphic material documenting the Robinson family's immigration to Ontario as well as Morris Robinson's professional history and business activities with Libman and Company.
Included is family correspondence; the Robinson's customs paperwork and travel documents; Morris' curriculum vitae, professional records and some documentation of his business activities; and genealogical accounts of the Robinson family including a history by Lilian Henry. Of note is a letter Morris Robinson sent to Irma when he first arrived in Boston on his way to Toronto as well as letters Morris' parents hand delivered to Irma just before she left with the children to join Morris in Canada.
Identified in the photographs are: Morris Robinson and Phoebe Robinson.
Custodial History
Material was in possession of Morris Robinson. Morris donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Morris Robinson was born in Cape Town, South Africa on May 27th, 1948 and grew up in Benoni. He completed his Bachelor of Commerce degree at the University of Witwatersrand and graduated as a Chartered Accountant in 1973. On February 25th, 1973. Morris married Irma Startz who was born in Benoni, South Africa on December 10, 1951. Irma earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Witwatersrand and went on to obtain a Post-Graduate Higher Teacher's Diploma. The Robinsons have three sons. Their first son, Marc, was born in South Africa on September 26th, 1976 (just a few months after the Soweto riots). Their sons Frank (b. December 31, 1980) and Daniel (b. March 12, 1985) were born in Toronto.
The Robinsons were motivated by political unrest, which manifested in the anti-apartheid Soweto uprising of June 1976, and the desire for a safe future for their family, to seek opportunity abroad and to emigrate. In February of 1977, Morris heard through friends about an accounting job opportunity in Canada and was officially appointed to the post of comptroller at Libman and Company, then Canadas’ largest jewellery manufacturer. The Robinsons arrived in Toronto in early 1978 and settled in Thornhill, Ontario. In 1989, Morris became a partner of Libman and Company. During his career in the jewellery industry, Morris was involved with the Canadian Jewellers Association and served as the organization's chairman. He was also a founding member and first treasurer of the Diamond Bourse of Canada. Irma pursued a teaching career with the Toronto District School Board, specializing in ESL and eventually becoming the principal at an ESL school for adults. The Robinsons were founding members of Shaar Shalom Synagogue. In 2012 the Robinsons sold the family home in Thornhill and moved into the city to be closer to their children and grandchildren.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Business
Immigrants--Canada
Families
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1981-4-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
2 folders of textual records
Date
1928-1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of David Waserman's Polish passport, Canadian immigration identification card stamped at Halifax upon his arrival on the Megantic, two copies of his birth certificate, a Polish police clearance document, and an army service book. There is also a Polish passport for Syma Nachsztern and her immigration identification card stamped upon arrival on the SS United States.
MG_RG
MG1
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Waserman, David
Places
Canada
Poland
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-12-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
1 photograph : b&w ; 5 x 4 cm
Date
1921
Scope and Content
Accession consists of documents and a passport photograph pertaining to the immigration of Joseph Kalman Wainryb (Wajnryb) age 17 from Warsaw, Poland to Toronto in 1921.These include his passport, legal and medical certificates, and ship's cabin and landing cards.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Wainryb, Joseph Kalman
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
1979-9-5
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
2 May 1976
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one booklet for the annual meeting of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Services of Canada, Central Region held at Temple Sinai with guest speaker Mr. Gaynor Jacobson, Executive Vice-President of H.I.A.S.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Name Access
Jewish Immigrant Aid Services (Toronto, Ont.)
Jacobson, Gaynor
Temple Sinai Congregation of Toronto
Places
Toronto, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Stephen Pincus
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Stephen Pincus
Number
OH 415
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
26 Apr. 2015
Interviewer
Jessica Parker
Total Running Time
1 hr. 23 min.
Use Restrictions
Restriction noted by interviewee on video/oral history release form: The foregoing is subject to OJA obtaining my prior written consent prior to placing any of the interview on the internet (other than password protected communications)
Researches should be directed to the access copy created by Stephen Pincus.
Biography
Although he grew up in South Africa, Stephen was born in England where his father was studying. When they returned to South Africa in 1963, they visited Israel on the way, and five-year-old Stephen fell in love with the exotic, young Jewish state.
As a teenager, Stephen was OHtive in Habonim, South Africa’s largest Zionist youth movement and became head of that movement in the late 1970s, running the largest Jewish youth camp in the world. Stephen was also elected chair of South Africa’s Zionist Youth Council, the umbrella body for all-Jewish youth organizations in the country. He and his wife Michelle then moved to Israel with a Habonim group that established Kibbutz Tuval in the western Galilee.
In 1982 Stephen came to study in Toronto. He served as administrator of Bialik Hebrew Day School and as camp director of Camp Shalom, while completing MBA and LLB degrees, and was awarded the Gold Medal at Osgoode Hall Law School. Stephen and Michelle started a family and both their own parents immigrated to Toronto.
Stephen is a senior partner and executive committee member at Goodmans LLP, is widely regarded as one of Canada’s leading business lawyers, and has played a pioneering role in the development of the country’s capital markets. He is is the founding chair of the Canada Africa Chamber of Business, a director of Kew Media Group, a member of the Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency for Israel, chair of the board of Makom, and founder of Kaleidoscope, a unique multi-dimensional Israel engagement program.
He and his wife Michelle; their two married children, Daniel and Lisa; granddaughter Olivia; and therapy dog Mannee all live in Toronto.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Pincus, Stephen, 1958-
Geographic Access
England
Original Format
Digital file
Copy Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:56 Stephen discusses his family background, including notable forebears, his grandparents' immigration in the early 1900s, and the largely Lithuanian composition of the South African Jewish community.
03:04 Stephen discusses his South-African-born parents' backgrounds and how they met.
05:14 Stephen mentions that he was born in England in 1958, while his family was abroad for his father's medical studies. He lived there until they returned to South Africa in 1964.
06:25 Stephen remembers arriving in South Africa and all the family that had come to greet them who hadn't seen his parents for eight years. He mentions that all correspondence happened via mail.
08:01 Stephen describes his family's relationship to Judaism: They were Orthodox in name, but took a pragmatic approach. Stephen went to public school and received a lot of his Jewish education from Habonim.
09:27 Stephen describes his bar mitzvah celebrations. Stephen remembers preparing his speech. He enjoys public speaking and this was a starting point.
10:49 Stephen talks about the Habonim youth movement. Stephen's involvement began in his early teens. He became the head of the movement in the late 1970s and ran the camp for a couple of years. Stephen is organizing a trip this summer to Israel for alumni of Habonim.
14:50 Stephen explains that he has a foot in South Africa, Canada, and Israel.
15:43 Stephen talks about the unique environment in South Africa that contributed to Zionism. He talks about the Soweto Uprising in 1976. Israel was a place where South African Jews could create something better. Stephen finds it ironic that some see in Israel a continuation of apartheid.
19:53 Stephen talks about his parents' view of his involvement in Habonim. He relates a story where his father became upset when Stephen participated in a march protesting a United Nations resolution instead of studying for an exam.
21:37 Stephen's father was risk-averse and practical. He wasn't keen on Stephen moving to Israel and would discourage his son indirectly. Stephen went to Israel anyway.
22:20 Stephen's parents did not give voice to strong political views. Stephen remembers being at a poetry reading at a friend's parents' house when he was eight. It was his first mixed-race experience. Stephen and his friends were politically active in high school and as undergraduate students.
24:27 Stephen explains how Zionism and Israel were his major focus while the South African situation was secondary. Stephen remembers visiting Soweto a number of times.
26:00 Stephen discusses the paradox of under apartheid while opposing it. He sees this as a central issue that white South Africans of his generation faced. He discusses the Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings of the 1990s.
28:24 Stephen recounts how Israel fell into the arms of South Africa after being pushed away by various African states in the 1970s.
29:03 Stephen describes his involvement in resuscitating Machon Le'Madrichei Chutz La'Aretz, a year-long leadership course for youth leaders in Israel. South African Jews would defer their army service to participate. In 1975, the South African government determined it would not let Jewish students defer for this purpose.
31:16 Stephen discusses his decision to leave South Africa.
32:51 Stephen discusses how not going on Machon is one of his regrets.
33:28 Stephen discusses the places he considered immigrating to. He was focused on going to Israel and was part of a group that went to live on a kibbutz in the western Galilee.
37:24 Stephen discusses previous trips to Israel. The first time he went to the country was when his family went from England to South Africa. This was before the Six-Day War and he remembers barbed wire in Jerusalem. Stephen thinks he probably fell in love with Israel at this time.
38:32 Stephen explains the meaning of the words machon and garin.
39:23 Stephen describes the kupah meshutefet ("common treasury box") economic system. The system didn't last very long.
40:16 Stephen describes how his family and friends reacted to the news that he was making aliyah.
41:09 Stephen discusses a car trip he and his wife took throughout South Africa. He relates how they were caught in a flood and ended up being taken in by a black family. Stephen reflects on the irony of their situation.
44:07 Stephen discusses he and his wife's arrival in Israel. Stephen was accepted by Hebrew University to study law. Ultimately, he and his wife chose to move to Toronto at the beginning of 1982.
45:06 Stephen shares what he brought with him to Toronto from South Africa.
47:20 Stephen discusses his initial trip to Canada in January 1982. He thinks that it was the coldest winter Toronto experienced until 2014. He discusses some of the hurdles he faced adjusting to the new climate.
51:33 Stephen discusses settling in Canada and going to school.
56:25 Stephen discusses opening an issue of the Canadian Jewish News and seeing that a summer camp was looking for a director. He was director for a couple of years and he and his wife would spend their summer at the camp.
57:05 Stephen discusses how Habonim was different from Camp Shalom, the camp he worked at in Canada.
58:24 Stephen discusses his transition from being involved in a Zionist and socialist youth movement to ending up in business and corporate law. He notes that he has shifted in a number of respects in terms of his perspective on economic values, social values, and religious values.
1:02:55 Stephen discusses his experience integrating into Canadian society.
1:05:20 Stephen contrasts his parents' experience coming later in life with his own experience. They had a wonderful time when they came because there was a large community of retired South African expatriates by then.
1:09:54 Stephen discusses the role of the local Jewish community, and local South African Jewish community, played in his acclimatization.
1:11:59 Stephen discusses how he came to work for Goodmans.
1:14:17 Stephen discusses the differences he has noticed between Canadians and South Africans. He feels that South Africans as a group tend to be more direct than Canadians. In his opinion, South Africans lie somewhere between Israelis and Canadians in terms of directness.
1:17:51 Stephen discusses his journey, coming from a secular Zionist background and starting a program of Jewish learning later in life.
1:20:40 Stephen discusses his own approach to keeping Jewish traditions and customs. He is observant, but not dogmatic.
1:26:11 Stephen discusses his two children. His son is a medical resident and his daughter is finishing up a law/business administration program.
1:27:09 Stephen discusses synagogues he is involved with.
1:29:10 Stephen discusses cultural differences he has experienced raising his children in Canada.
1:33:04 Stephen explains the decisions he and his wife made regarding their children's education.
1:35:15 Stephen describes his children's relationships with their grandparents.
1:37:31 Stephen answers the question, "Do you feel Canadian?"
1:41:55 Stephen discusses his involvement with the Canada-South Africa Chamber of Business.
1:42:42 Stephen discusses the differences in being involved with the ex-South African community more broadly and the ex-South African Jewish community.
1:44:58 Stephen discusses his children's connections to South Africa, which he says are quite limited.
1:46:37 Stephen shares food words and expressions that he shared with his children and which they now use.
1:47:55 Stephen offers a few final remarks about his decision to immigrate to Canada and the relationship between Canadian identity, Jewish/Israeli identity, and South African identity.
Source
Oral Histories

Israel, the Opportunity for New Beginnings

An Indoor Life

Name
Karrie Weinstock
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Karrie Weinstock
Number
OH 435
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 435 part 1: 22 min.
OH 435 part 2: 11 min.
OH 435 part 3: 22 min.
OH 435 part 4: 5 min.
Biography
Karrie’s life has long been characterized by both privilege and an acute sensitivity to the challenges facing those less fortunate than herself. Although she grew up in a happy professional family, her childhood was marked by uncertainty. Her father, Jack Unterhalter, was a civil rights lawyer in the Apartheid era, active in left-wing politics, and Karrie recalls him keeping a packed briefcase by the door during the state of emergency in case the authorities should come for him.
As a young woman, Karrie studied to be an English teacher at Homerton College, Cambridge. She then returned to South Africa, where she taught for two years, before moving to Boston to pursue a master’s degree in educational administration, planning and social policy at Harvard. Upon graduating, she took a position at Milton OHademy, an independent school in Boston. She enjoyed her time there but chose to relocate to Toronto, where she had an aunt. For over three decades, she has worked at Branksome Hall, first as an English teacher, then as an administrator, and now in her current role as deputy principal.
In 1985, Karrie married Michael Weinstock, a native Torontonian, whose family embraced her as one of their own. Both Karrie and Michael had been married previously and through her marriage to Michael, she inherited three beautiful stepdaughters. Karrie and Michael had a child of their own, a son who shares his mother’s love of South Africa, visiting the country each year.
Recognizing her great fortune in life, Karrie gives back through her volunteer work with the Stephen Leacock Foundation, which, among other initiatives, supports low-fee independent schools in South Africa that are connected to independent and public schools in Canada so as to form a unique Triangle of Hope.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Weinstock, Karen
Geographic Access
Boston (Mass.)
Cambridge (England)
Jamestown (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Karrie outlines her immediate family. She was born in Johannesburg, South Africa.
01:28 Karrie discusses her family history. Her maternal grandfather was born in 1891 in Lithuania. He came to South Africa in 1914 to escape the military. Her maternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Lithuania. Her paternal grandfather was born in 1888 in Poland. Her paternal grandmother, whose parents came from Lithuania, was born in London in 1893.
03:54 Karrie discusses her father's career as a civil rights lawyer. She discusses her father's role as a founding member of the Liberal Party in South Africa.
06:35 Karrie discusses the impOHt her father's political OHtivism had on her family. She offers examples to illustrate the unique situation in her home while growing up (e.g. political meetings, fear of her father's imminent arrest, visits from political prisoners).
08:26 Karrie offers her impressions of the position taken by the greater Jewish community in South Africa.
09:27 Karrie explains why she and her siblings attended independent schools.
11:00 Karrie discusses her family's involvement in the Jewish community and Jewish prOHtice.
13:15 Karrie discusses how her parents stressed the importance of education and viewed education as a means of leaving South Africa. She discusses the education paths of her siblings as well as her own. Karrie received her teaching qualifications at Cambridge and earned a master's degree in administration planning and social policy at Harvard.
15:34 Karrie lives in Canada. Her sister lives in London. Her brother opted to return to South Africa.
16:38 Karrie relates an anecdote that compares her current situation of seeing her mother once a year with Black workers in South Africa who saw their children once a year.
17:48 Karrie explains that both her sister and brother were unable to return to South Africa for a period of time. In her sister's case it was due to her political activity; in her brother's case, it was due to his refusal to serve in the military.
18:55 Karrie discusses her "charmed" life growing up.
20:54 Karrie discusses her teaching qualifications and first teaching position at an independent school for mixed-race students.
Part 2:
00:56 Karrie discusses her experience at Harvard. Specifically, she mentions a friendship.
06:09 Karrie explains why her parents preferred that she not return to South Africa.
07:09 Karrie relates the story of finding a job at Milton Academy in Boston following graduation.
Part 3:
00:00 Karrie explains how she decided to move to Toronto.
03:45 Karrie explains how she became engaged and married to Clive Lovett in 1979. She explains the factors that contributed to the end of their four-year marriage.
05:16 Karrie discusses her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Branksome Hall.
12:59 Karrie describes meeting and marrying Michael Weinstock. Michael has three children from a previous marriage. Karrie and Michael have one son together.
15:20 Karrie explains how Peter Oliver, a prominent South African-born Toronto philanthropist and businessman, arranged to fund and build an independent school, the Get-Ahead Project School in rural South Africa. She explains her involvement with the project and the connection with Branksome Hall, Rose Avenue Public School, a high-needs school in Toronto, and the Get-Ahead Project School in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Karrie continues to describe the inter-school program that has been set up for students at Branksome Hall, a school in Jamestown; Toronto, and the Get-Ahead school.
02:26 Karrie discusses her role on the board of the Leacock Foundation and her opportunity to further the inter-school program. She cites an example of how they contributed to the Get-Ahead school.
04:17 Karrie reminisces about times when she felt Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

A Triangle of Hope

A Packed Suitcase by the Door

A Charmed Existence

Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
4
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1955]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Caplan was born on 4 February 1888, in Russia, to David and Ida Caplan. He settled in Canada in 1905. He married Sophie (née Gold) in 1910 and had four children: Arthur, Harold, Leonard and Evelyn (Herschorn).
Isadore was president of I. Caplan Limited, his realty company, which was located in the Caplan Building on Duncan Street. He was a founding member of Shaarei Shomayim Congregation and was on the board of directors for the Toronto Talmud Torah and the Mount Sinai Hospital. He was president of the Hebrew Free Loan Association of Toronto, and was affiliated with other organizations such as the Jewish Home for the Aged, Baycrest Hospital, the Primrose Club and the Mount Sinai Lodge AF & AM.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Caplan, which was used in the 1967 edition of the Who's Who in Canadian Jewry.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
6
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jacob Egit was born 27 August 1912, in Poland, the son of Moses and Shindel Egit. He married Clara (née Schwartzbard) and had three children: Mary (Betel), Ryszard and Mark.
After completing his schooling in Poland, he became a journalist and was a staff member of the Polish and Jewish press and active in communal work in pre-war Poland. After the Second World War, Egit became associated with the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration (UNRA) and the Joint Distribution Committee, and took part in the rehabilitation of Jewish persons from DP camps. He later became director of a book publishing firm.
In 1958 he came to Toronto with his family and became the associate executive director of the Israel Histadrut Campaign, a member of the Speakers Bureau of the Canadian Jewish Congress, secretary of the Organization of the Jews from Poland and a member of the Executive of the Toronto Jewish Cultural Association.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Jacob Egit.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 14
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
14
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1965]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
Isadore Green was born 22 September 1898, in Poland, the son of Younison and Rivka Green. He married Toby (née Goldman) and had three children: Goldie, Carl and Jerry.
Green was an active member of the Toronto Jewish community. He was the past president and secretary of the Ostrovtzer Congregation; president of the Adeth Israel Congregation in Oshawa; president of the Radomer Mutual Benefit Society; founder and secretary of the Radomer Co-operative Credit Association Ltd.; founder and treasurer of the Canadian Polish Farband; executive member of the Canadian Jewish Congress Board; national recording secretary of the United Radomer Relief, USA and Canada; founder of the Warsaw Lodzer; founder of the Toronto branch of the Jewish Immigrant Aid Society; founder of Beth Radom Congregation, and an active Israel Bonds salesman.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Isadore Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 30
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
30
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 13 x 9 cm
Admin History/Bio
Sarah (née Rawet) Mendly was born to Shapsa and Feiga Rawet. The family immigrated to Canada sometime around 1926. Sarah was the president of the Toronto Chapter of the B’nai Brith Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Herzl Zion Ladies’ Auxiliary, the Jewish Home for the Aged and Baycrest Hospital. Sarah Mendly was the wife of photographer, Gordon Mendly. She died on 31 December 1992.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of Sarah Mendly in her husband's studio on College Street.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 18; Series 1; Item 13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Gordon Mendly fonds
Portraits series
Level
Item
Fonds
18
Series
1
Item
13
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1960]
Physical Description
1 negative : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Admin History/Bio
David Green was born in 1897, in Kaminka, Poland, the son of Reb Chaim Shochet. In 1913, he immigrated with his family to Toronto, at the age of sixteen. Three years later he married Tilly (née Litowitz) and had three children: Hyman, Beulah and Esther.
Green was an active member of several Jewish organizations and clubs, such as the Palestine Lodge, and was president of the Hebrew National Association (Folks Farein), president of Beth Lida Congregation, vice-president of the Mount Sinai Cemetery Association, vice-president of the Jewish Public Library, vice-president of the College Memorial Chapel , vice-president of the Toronto Jewish Old Folks Home, and was on the board of directors of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. Green died on 13 May 1977.
Scope and Content
Item is a portrait of David Green.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
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