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17 records – page 1 of 1.
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (seated) of Sudbury, Ontario, with a friend in the northern wilderness. The pair are monitoring a fur trapline. The friend is pictured preparing some hot food.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Trapping
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Custodial History
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is holding a long stick with several dozen fish hanging from it.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Laplanders in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve and another man is holding snowshoes and one man is on cross-country skis.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Sami (European people)
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two Algonquin women, nicknamed "the Buckshots", in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. They are standing outside in the snow.
Name Access
Buckshots
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right) of Sudbury, Ontario standing with an Indigenous man from Shawinigan, Ontario. They are both holding a baby beaver in their hands.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario, seated on a stoop in front of his fur post in Biscotasing. There are several children standing nearby and his sign is partially visible.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1945]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve's fur store in the Flatiron building in Sudbury, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Architecture
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1925]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (centre) standing with two unidentified men in front of a wooden house, in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Single story houses
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left) standing next to an unidentified man, probably in Biscotasing, which is near Sudbury. The men are standing amongst some rocks and the man on the left is holding a small hand pick. Leve is looking at a piece of stone with a magnifying glass.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1919
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve with three Indigenous men and a dog team in Biscotasing, Ontario, which is near Sudbury. Leve is pictured second from the left.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits, Group
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left) of Sudbury, Ontario, with an Indigenous man near Pogamasing Lake, Ontario. Pictured with the men is a dog harnessed to a sled.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Dogs
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Pogamasing Lake (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1921]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario with three friends. They are standing next to a float plane that is docked by the shore of Lake Biscotasi, in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Floatplanes
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1920
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve, of Sudbury, Ontario seated on a cart with three bags of fur, at Bisco station in Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Fur trade
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1945]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jack Leve's fur store in Sudbury, Ontario. The image depicts a group of men standing on the sidewalk looking at two bear cubs on rope leashes in front of the store.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Bear cubs
Fur trade
Storefronts
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Sudbury (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (right), of Sudbury, Ontario, seated in the wilderness under a canvas lean-to, with an Indigenous family.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1920]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a Kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve (left), of Sudbury, Ontario and an Indigenous man in a canoe. They are likely on Lake Biscotasi, near Biscotasing, Ontario.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Canoes and canoeing
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Biscotasing (Ont.)
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
1921
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 13 x 18 cm and 10 x 12 cm
Admin History/Bio
Jack Leve was born in Russia. In 1904, after his brother was murdered in a pogrom, his parents put Jack—who was only nine at the time—on a ship to Montreal, where he lived with relatives. He did very well at Hebrew school, but one day he dipped a snowball in water to freeze it and hit the rabbi with it on his walk home, knocking him out. When he was caught, he decided to move to New York City and found a factory job, skinning skunks for fur coats.
After serving with the Canadian forces in the First World War, Jack decided to trade furs, working in James Bay. He spent most of his time with First Nations individuals, making many connections and even befriending Grey Owl. In 1938, Jack married Sarah Rives. When Judy was born in Montreal, the family had to send out a dog sled to notify Jack, who was in an igloo on Baffin Island.
Jack eventually settled in Sudbury around 1944. He had a base office just above Wolfe's book store where he kept two baby bears which he fed with baby bottles. He spent a great deal of time in the bush where he met with First Nations individuals, trapped, hunted, fished and purchased furs. Despite his rugged lifestyle, he was a staunch Zionist. In 1948, he relied on his contacts and skills as a fur trader to ship bullets hidden in mink, muskrat and otter furs to Israel to help the cause during the War of Independence. He was also an active member of the Jewish community in Sudbury. His wife kept a kosher home and Jack served on the executive of the synagogue and B'nai Brith.
Scope and Content
This item is a copy photograph and corresponding negative of Jack Leve of Sudbury, Ontario, holding two baby beavers.
Name Access
Leve, Jack
Subjects
Beavers
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Accession Number
1981-3-13
Source
Archival Descriptions
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