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33 records – page 1 of 1.
Accession Number
2013-12-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-12-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Date
1920-1965
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one digital image of a Mandel Bros. Produce Pasteurized Special Sour Cream lid.
Administrative History
Mandel’s Creamery opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel and, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
Mandel's Creamery manufactured cream cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, and butter milk under the labels Mandel Bros. & Silver Brand. They also manufactured for private label brands and other wholesale and retail customers. They sold wholesale butter, eggs, and hard cheese which they did not manufacture. Low salt & low fat cottage cheese was a specialty sold to institutions such as Baycrest Hospital. Their customers included supermarkets, bakeries, restaurants, institutions, resorts, and summer camps. There was also retail sales at the store front at 29 Baldwin St.
The business was sold by the Mandel family around 1965 to Mr. Bricks and Mr. Caplan who then sold it to Western Creamery some years later.
Subjects
Creameries
Business
Places
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2015-6-6
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
17 photographs : b&w (tiffs)
Date
1958-1970
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 17 scanned photographs from Joe Solomon's time as a camper and tripper at Camp Timberlane, an overnight camp founded in 1957 by Barry and Philomena Lowes on Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Since it's founding, Camp Timberlane has catered to Jewish campers from Toronto. There is a finding aid in the folder with the scanned photos.
Administrative History
Joseph Nathan Solomon was born on September 4, 1944 to Myer and Sarah (nee Grafstein) Solomon. He is their middle son. He has two brothers David (deceased 2013) and Robert. Solomon attended Forest Hill Collegiate Institute, University of Toronto for his Bachelors and Osgoode Law School. A highlight of Solomon's life is being a tripper at Camp Timberlane for over 15 years. Solomon practiced law with his father Myer Solomon for the firm Solomon & Solomon and independendly following Myer's retirement and death in the late 1980s. Solomon married Maureen (nee Kokotow) Solomon from Kirkland Lake, ON in 1968. They have two daughters Alida Solomon and Dara Solomon, who started serving as the director of the Ontario Jewish Archives in 2012. Alida Solomon is a chef and restaurant owner.
Subjects
Children
Camps
Name Access
Solomon, Joseph, 1944-
Camp Timberlane
Places
Haliburton, Ont.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2018-10-10
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of graphic material and textual records
Date
1925-1980
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Kirschner family, in particular Maurice and Gertrude Kirschner. Included are family photographs, wedding telegrams, marriage certificates, certificates of naturalization, and passports. Individuals identified in the photographs include: Ann Kirschner, Chaim Kirschner, Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor), Hannah Kirschner, Helen Kirschner, Joseph Kirschner, Maurice Kirschner, Shlomo Kirschner, Ruth Lowe, Bernice Taylor, Leah Taylor, and Saul Taylor.
Administrative History
Gertrude Kirschner (née Taylor) was born on 29 November 1907 in Toronto, Ontario. She lived with her parents at 770 Markham Street and finished high school. On 3 July 1932, she married Maurice Kirschner, with whom she had two daughters: Helen (b. 1934) and Elaine (b. 1942). The couple lived at 770 Markham Street until they bought their first home at 46 Gloucester Grove. They became founding members of Beth Sholom Synagogue on Englinton Avenue. Gertrude died 7 June 1982.
Maurice Kirschner was born on 13 August 1904 in Lyck, Germany. He was trained as a watchmaker and opened a watch repair shop on Bay Street, just north of Queen. The shop was demolished to make way for the new city hall. Maurice subsequently went to work for Sayvette, where he remained for the rest of his career. He died on 15 February 1980.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Availability of other formats: Digital copies (jpg, tif) have been created for thirty-one documents.
Subjects
Families
Immigrants--Canada
Married people
Name Access
Kirschner (family)
Kirschner, Gertrude
Kirschner, Maurice
Places
Germany
Ontario
Soviet Union
Source
Archival Accessions
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
Date
1931
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Subject
City Directories
Genealogy
Language
English
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
surprised with the low charges. CALL Lombard 2171 For all Departments JOS KRONICK President M. H.BERNSTEIN, Manager Modern Laundry
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
Date
1931
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Subject
City Directories
Genealogy
Language
English
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
Date
1931
Publisher
International Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Subject
City Directories
Genealogy
Language
English
Source
1931 Toronto Jewish Directory
Palmerston av (Low Bedding Co) Sugar Lillian 42 Cameron fnshr Sugar Louis 80 Grace tray Sugar LOuis 196 John apt 16 ctr Sugar Mary
Publisher
Publishers Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Source
1925 Toronto Jewish Directory
Date
1925
Publisher
Publishers Advertising Agency
Format
Directory
Subject
City Directories
Genealogy
Language
English
Source
1925 Toronto Jewish Directory
Factories. Offices Phone Trinity 6933 We guarentee Satisfaction Stores and Private at Low Rates. Dwellings Our specialty
identification is often impossible) low level financial documents like cheque stubs, receipts, requisition slips (unless they are
involved minimum capital. The work was extremely arduous, the conditions were poor and the pay was quite low. As a result, many
on low chairs and do not wear leather shoes to display their grief and humility. All distractions are removed: doors are kept
URL
http://www.ontariojewisharchives.org/exhibits/ymha/history/hl_hist_02.html
Format
textual record (electronic)
Source
History of the YMHA Online Exhibit
URL
http://www.ontariojewisharchives.org/exhibits/ymha/history/hl_hist_02.html
Format
textual record (electronic)
Language
English
Available Digital Content
Online Exhibits
Restrictions
No Restrictions
Place
Toronto
Source
History of the YMHA Online Exhibit
. The club primarily targeted disadvantaged boys from low income homes. It addressed the Y.M.H.A.’s gap in programming, since
Accession Number
2006-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2006-6-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm
Date
Aug. 1925
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of a group of boys from the Jewish Boys Club at Camp Bnai Brith. The boys are having their hands inspected for cleanliness. One of the counsellors in the background is reading from a merit book and another is setting up a tent. Pictured are:
Standing, third from the left: Sydney Blinick.
Inspecting the hands: Nadie Bronstein
Administrative History
The Jewish Boys’ Club was formed in 1921, under the leadership of M. M. Cohen, and was funded by the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies. The club operated out of a house on Simcoe Street, which had a games room, meeting rooms, library and offices. The Boys’ Club used various facilities around the city for its athletic programming.
The club primarily targeted disadvantaged boys from low income homes. It addressed the YMHA’s gap in programming, since their focus at the time was on young adults rather than boys. The club offered cultural programming, had basketball teams and ran a summer camp in cooperation with B’nai Brith
Name Access
Jewish Boys' Club.
Camp B'nai Brith.
Blinick, Sydney.
Bronstein, Nadie.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2008-10-1
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
2 photographs : b&w and col. ; 10 x 15 cm and 10 x 13 cm
Date
1939-2002
Scope and Content
This accession consists of records related to the Jewish community of Peterborough, Ontario, particularly the Beth Israel Congregation, the B'nai Brith lodge and the Hadassah chapter. The records include a Beth Israel Congregation diamond jubilee booklet, bulletins and correspondence, B'nai Brith bulletins, Hadassah-Wizo event invitation, programs, a recollection on the Peterborough Jewish community written by Rabbi Abraham Fine, with accompanying colour photograph, as well as one photograph of Martin Hollend with several other members of the Peterborough B'nai Brith lodge during the opening launch in 1939. Pictured are:
Back row, left to right: Jacob Low, Ben Rogow, Irving Moldaver, Hymie Smith, [Zimmel Levine?], Martin Hollend, Ben Swartz, Sam Moldaver.
Front row, left to right: Mayer Levine, Morris Cowan, Sid Goldstone, Isadore Black.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of the donor before they were donated to the Archives on Oct. 6, 2008.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Name
Montague Raisman
Material Format
sound recording
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Montague Raisman
Number
OH 64
Subject
Nonprofit organizations
Human rights
Antisemitism
World War, 1939-1945
Zionism
Interview Date
11 Jul. 1982
Quantity
1
Interviewer
Jack Lipinsky
Total Running Time
39:42 minutes
Conservation
Copied August 2003
Notes
Low sound volume
Use Restrictions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Biography
Montague Raisman came to Canada from England in 1926. He was actively involved in B'nai Brith Toronto Lodge and held positions of office. He served as the commanding officer for the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron in Toronto during the Second World War. He was instrumental in the formation of the Joint Public Relations Committee, a united Jewish voice in response to pro-Nazi activity.
Material Format
sound recording
Language
English
Name Access
Raisman, Montague
B'nai Brith
Lipinsky, Jack
Canadian Jewish Congress
Geographic Access
Toronto
Calgary (Alta.)
Montréal (Québec)
Original Format
Audio cassette
Copy Format
Audio cassette
Digital file
Transcript
G:\Description\Oral Histories\OH 64 - Raisman\OH64_Log.pdf
Source
Oral Histories

In this clip, Montague describes the formation of the B'nai Brith Air Cadet Squadron during the Second World War. He discusses the recruitment and training of the officers and cadets. He explains how this squadron was instrumental in changing recruitment qualifications to allow entry of new immigrants and black cadets.

In this clip, Montague Raisman discusses the events leading up to an association between B

Name
Karrie Weinstock
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Karrie Weinstock
Number
OH 435
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Interview Date
11 Jul. 2016
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
OH 435 part 1: 22 min.
OH 435 part 2: 11 min.
OH 435 part 3: 22 min.
OH 435 part 4: 5 min.
Biography
Karrie’s life has long been characterized by both privilege and an acute sensitivity to the challenges facing those less fortunate than herself. Although she grew up in a happy professional family, her childhood was marked by uncertainty. Her father, Jack Unterhalter, was a civil rights lawyer in the Apartheid era, active in left-wing politics, and Karrie recalls him keeping a packed briefcase by the door during the state of emergency in case the authorities should come for him.
As a young woman, Karrie studied to be an English teacher at Homerton College, Cambridge. She then returned to South Africa, where she taught for two years, before moving to Boston to pursue a master’s degree in educational administration, planning and social policy at Harvard. Upon graduating, she took a position at Milton OHademy, an independent school in Boston. She enjoyed her time there but chose to relocate to Toronto, where she had an aunt. For over three decades, she has worked at Branksome Hall, first as an English teacher, then as an administrator, and now in her current role as deputy principal.
In 1985, Karrie married Michael Weinstock, a native Torontonian, whose family embraced her as one of their own. Both Karrie and Michael had been married previously and through her marriage to Michael, she inherited three beautiful stepdaughters. Karrie and Michael had a child of their own, a son who shares his mother’s love of South Africa, visiting the country each year.
Recognizing her great fortune in life, Karrie gives back through her volunteer work with the Stephen Leacock Foundation, which, among other initiatives, supports low-fee independent schools in South Africa that are connected to independent and public schools in Canada so as to form a unique Triangle of Hope.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Weinstock, Karen
Geographic Access
Boston (Mass.)
Cambridge (England)
Jamestown (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
Part 1:
00:00 Karrie outlines her immediate family. She was born in Johannesburg, South Africa.
01:28 Karrie discusses her family history. Her maternal grandfather was born in 1891 in Lithuania. He came to South Africa in 1914 to escape the military. Her maternal grandmother was born in 1903 in Lithuania. Her paternal grandfather was born in 1888 in Poland. Her paternal grandmother, whose parents came from Lithuania, was born in London in 1893.
03:54 Karrie discusses her father's career as a civil rights lawyer. She discusses her father's role as a founding member of the Liberal Party in South Africa.
06:35 Karrie discusses the impOHt her father's political OHtivism had on her family. She offers examples to illustrate the unique situation in her home while growing up (e.g. political meetings, fear of her father's imminent arrest, visits from political prisoners).
08:26 Karrie offers her impressions of the position taken by the greater Jewish community in South Africa.
09:27 Karrie explains why she and her siblings attended independent schools.
11:00 Karrie discusses her family's involvement in the Jewish community and Jewish prOHtice.
13:15 Karrie discusses how her parents stressed the importance of education and viewed education as a means of leaving South Africa. She discusses the education paths of her siblings as well as her own. Karrie received her teaching qualifications at Cambridge and earned a master's degree in administration planning and social policy at Harvard.
15:34 Karrie lives in Canada. Her sister lives in London. Her brother opted to return to South Africa.
16:38 Karrie relates an anecdote that compares her current situation of seeing her mother once a year with Black workers in South Africa who saw their children once a year.
17:48 Karrie explains that both her sister and brother were unable to return to South Africa for a period of time. In her sister's case it was due to her political activity; in her brother's case, it was due to his refusal to serve in the military.
18:55 Karrie discusses her "charmed" life growing up.
20:54 Karrie discusses her teaching qualifications and first teaching position at an independent school for mixed-race students.
Part 2:
00:56 Karrie discusses her experience at Harvard. Specifically, she mentions a friendship.
06:09 Karrie explains why her parents preferred that she not return to South Africa.
07:09 Karrie relates the story of finding a job at Milton Academy in Boston following graduation.
Part 3:
00:00 Karrie explains how she decided to move to Toronto.
03:45 Karrie explains how she became engaged and married to Clive Lovett in 1979. She explains the factors that contributed to the end of their four-year marriage.
05:16 Karrie discusses her teaching and administrative responsibilities at Branksome Hall.
12:59 Karrie describes meeting and marrying Michael Weinstock. Michael has three children from a previous marriage. Karrie and Michael have one son together.
15:20 Karrie explains how Peter Oliver, a prominent South African-born Toronto philanthropist and businessman, arranged to fund and build an independent school, the Get-Ahead Project School in rural South Africa. She explains her involvement with the project and the connection with Branksome Hall, Rose Avenue Public School, a high-needs school in Toronto, and the Get-Ahead Project School in South Africa.
Part 4:
00:00 Karrie continues to describe the inter-school program that has been set up for students at Branksome Hall, a school in Jamestown; Toronto, and the Get-Ahead school.
02:26 Karrie discusses her role on the board of the Leacock Foundation and her opportunity to further the inter-school program. She cites an example of how they contributed to the Get-Ahead school.
04:17 Karrie reminisces about times when she felt Canadian.
Source
Oral Histories

A Triangle of Hope

A Packed Suitcase by the Door

A Charmed Existence

Name
Anthony Melman, 1947-
Material Format
moving images
Interview Date
27 Sept. 2017
Source
Oral Histories
Name
Anthony Melman, 1947-
Number
OH 447
Subject
Immigrants--Canada
Businessmen
Capitalists and financiers
South Africa--Emigration and immigration
Interview Date
27 Sept. 2017
Interviewer
Lisa Newman
Total Running Time
1 hr., 19 min.
Biography
Anthony “Tony” Melman was born in Johannesburg, South Africa on 1 June 1947 to Frances and Jack Melman. He was Frances and Jack’s second child, their first being Tony’s older sister, Lillian. Both of Tony’s parents were second-generation South Africans, his father’s family originating from Lithuania and his mother’s from Poland.
Tony describes himself as having been “quite naughty” as a child, which, among other things, resulted in him being sent to a Methodist boarding school. The experience was not entirely negative as Tony forged close friendships with other Jewish boys at the school. Prefiguring his lifelong passion for music, he even formed a rock ‘n’ roll band while he was there.
After high school, Tony enrolled in the army, eventually becoming a major. His rebellious streak alive and well, he would sometimes go AWOL in order to play music at different nightclubs around town.
Tony’s postsecondary education spanned several institutions: He holds a bachelor of science degree from Wits University, a master of business administration degree (gold medalist) from the University of Cape Town, and a doctor of philosophy degree (also from Wits). At the time, Tony thought of his PhD as a kind of “ticket” for leaving South Africa.
Tony and his wife came to Toronto in February 1977 and fell in love with the city. In July, Tony took up a position at CIBC, where he rose to the position of senior vice president. In 1984, he left CIBC to co-found Onex Corporation, where he stayed until 2006. Upon leaving Onex, he enjoyed a brief retirement before returning to the world of finance, co-founding Acasta Capital in 2012 and Acasta Enterprises in 2015.
In addition to music, Tony is passionate about health and fitness. He and his wife Valerie have three children.
Material Format
moving images
Language
English
Name Access
Melman, Anthony
Geographic Access
Cape Town (South Africa)
Johannesburg (South Africa)
Toronto (Ont.)
Original Format
Digital file
Transcript
00:15 Anthony introduces himself. He states his date and place of birth and describes his immediate family. He was born in Johannesburg, South Africa on 1 June 1947. Growing up, he had an older sister, Lillian. His parents were Frances and Jack Melman.
00:50 Anthony discusses his family history. His parents were born in South Africa and were second-generation South Africans. His father's family was from Lithuania originally while his mother's family was from Poland.
01:15 Anthony talks about his sister. He relates a story about her marking up his face when they were little. They weren't close. Today, she lives in Los Angeles with her family.
02:40 Anthony talks about himself as a child. He describes himself as "quite naughty." His naughty behaviour led his father to send him to boarding school.
03:55 Anthony discusses Jewish observance at home. They were Orthodox but did not run an Orthodox home. He shares memories of synagogue attendance.
05:13 Anthony discusses his father's relationship to Judaism. He describes his father as "a proud Jew." He was not, however, an especially religious man.
06:05 Anthony discusses his father's profession. Jack Melman was a lawyer who ran a family practice. He did not encourage Anthony to follow in his footsteps, professionally-speaking.
07:47 Anthony explains his decision-making process around leaving South Africa. He then talks about his family's reaction when he informed them of his decision. They were supportive.
09:25 Anthony talks about his schooling. He attended a Methodist boarding school, where he formed a rock 'n' roll band. The Jewish boys at the school bonded over their outsider status. His education was in English, although he did learn Afrikaans.
13:05 Anthony remembers his bar mitzvah. It was a fun event.
14:25 Anthony talks about his time in the army. Conscription was not mandatory at the time. His father felt it was important for Anthony to serve his country. Anthony became a major in the army. He also relates stories of going AWOL to play music at different nightclubs.
20:05 Anthony talks about his mother, who was very musical. Neither Anthony's father nor his sister were musical. Anthony concludes his love of music comes from his mother. On the whole, Anthony's family was indifferent to his musical interests. His mother-in-law appreciated his music.
23:18 Anthony elaborates upon the continuing importance of music in his life. He wrote music for each of his daughter's weddings as well as for his son's bar mitzvah. He considers his music spiritual as well as philosophical.
25:44 Anthony discusses his postsecondary education at the University of Witswatersrand, where he studied chemical engineering. He did not want to become a chemical engineer, so he went to Cape Town to attend business school. Following that, he went into the workforce only to decide to do a PhD. He saw the PhD as a "ticket" to exit South Africa.
28:57 Anthony explains how he came to North America upon completing his PhD in December 1976.
30:10 Anthony describes falling in love with Toronto. He and his wife came in February 1977. They had never experienced snow before. He began working at CIBC in July 1977.
32:20 Anthony talks about friends in Toronto who helped him and his wife get set-up.
34:45 Anthony discusses how he came to co-found Onex. It became a launching pad for his "evolution" in finance.
43:30 Anthony talks about what he means by "evolution." He talks about his early forays into business (such as selling his mother's sandwiches at school) and his later entrepreneurial endeavours. He believes it is necessary to be both tough and fair in business.
46:00 Anthony discusses a Financial Post article that profiled him. He considers himself to have been instrumental in Onex's success. He cites Celestica as an example. He speaks at length about the Labatt takeover.
50:45 Anthony returns to the theme of evolution. He considers himself to have been at grade one when he came to Canada. Now he is "as far as . . . most people can go."
52:20 Anthony talks about his decision to leave Onex after twenty-one years. He felt that the culture changed. It was not a culture that he felt comfortable with.
52:55 Anthony talks about his short-lived retirement, during which time he was the chair of Baycrest. He also devoted himself to his hobbies, including guitar and photography.
54:50 Anthony recalls his experience being approached by Belinda Stronach regarding a business opportunity. Together, they started Acasta Capital.
57:30 Anthony talks about his passion for and commitment to fitness.
1:02:05 Anthony discusses fainting in a Four Seasons hotel in New York and hitting his head on the way down. At the time, he attributed it to low blood sugar. Anthony goes on to relate his prior and subsequent health history.
1:11:00 Anthony talks about his life today, including his health, the significance of the number eleven for him, his family, and Acasta Capital/Acasta Enterprises. Anthony closes on the theme of people and the importance of people to business.
Source
Oral Histories

Methodist Boarding School

Family Reactions

Getting Started

Dealmaker of the Year

Address
29 Baldwin Street
Source
Landmarks

Mandel’s opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel. And, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel, from approx. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
Address
29 Baldwin Street
Time Period
1915-1970
Scope Note
Mandel’s opened between 1913-1920. It was initially owned by Harry Mandel. After 1944, it was owned by one of his sons William Mandel. And, in the 1950s, it was owned by the brothers Saul, Abraham, Ben, and William Mandel, from approx. From 1960 to approximately 1965, it was owned by William Mandel (exclusively).
History
Mandel's Creamery manufactured cream cheese, cottage cheese, sour cream, and butter milk under the labels Mandel Bros. & Silver Brand. They also manufactured for private label brands and other wholesale and retail customers. They also sold wholesale butter, eggs, and hard cheese which they did not manufacture. Low salt & low fat cottage was a specialty sold to institutions such as Baycrest Hospital. Their customers included supermarkets, bakeries, restaurants, institutions, resorts, and summer camps. There were also retail sales out of the store front at 29 Baldwin St. The business was sold around 1965 to Mr. Bricks and Mr. Caplan who then sold it to Western Creamery some years later.
Category
Food-related business
Source
Landmarks
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Source
Landmarks

In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Address
1612 Dudley Rd
Time Period
1958-present
Scope Note
In 1958, Camp Timberlane was founded by Barry and Philomena Lowes on the shores of the Lake of Two Islands in the Haliburton Highlands. Their vision was to create a camping experience that would build confidence, spirit and leadership. They strived to provide a nurturing environment that recognized a person’s uniqueness and where values would be learned that would benefit them over a lifetime. The tradition continues today and is being carried out by the present Director and Owner Corey Mandell who attended Timberlane as a camper and counselor.
Category
Camps and Resorts
Source
Landmarks
Passenger Names
Low, Abraham
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Low, Abraham
Page Number
218
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Lowe, Arthur
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Passenger Names
Lowe, Arthur
Page Number
564
Date Range
June 6, 1911 to January 19, 1915
Photographer
Harvey and Adena Glasner
Source
Rotenberg Ledger
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1907]
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (1 negative) ; 18 x 13 cm and 12 x 10 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a copy print and corresponding negative of Jacob Low with his younger brother Louis, of Peterborough, Ontario.
Subjects
Boys
Brothers
Portraits
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Peterborough (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-7-12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
ID
Item 4083
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Item
4083
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[193-]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 18 x 13 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of a Jewish school in Poland. The photograph depicts the students and teachers of the school assembled in front of it. The photograph was sent to Sarah Low of Peterborough, Ontario.
Subjects
Portraits, Group
Schools
Students
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Poland
Accession Number
1978-7-12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Source
Archival Descriptions
Level
Item
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1913]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 13 x 17 cm
Scope and Content
This item is a photograph of the Low & Co. junk business, located at 385 Bethune Street (west side of Bethune, near Hunter Street), in Peterborough. Abraham Low is standing in the doorway. The boy on the sidewalk is probably Jacob (Jack) Low.
Subjects
Business
Repro Restriction
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Peterborough (Ont.)
Accession Number
1978-7-12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
ID
Fonds 13; File 4
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Maurice Solway fonds
Level
File
Fonds
13
File
4
Material Format
textual record
Date
1926-1958
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
The file contains low quality photocopies from the original scrapbook. These are primarily of newspaper clippings regarding recitals and reviews from Toronto newspapers in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
Subjects
Scrapbooks
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) series
Housing Committee sub-series
Level
Sub-series
ID
Fonds 17; Series 4-5
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Canadian Jewish Congress, Ontario Region fonds
United Jewish Relief Agencies (UJRA) series
Housing Committee sub-series
Level
Sub-series
Fonds
17
Series
4-5
Material Format
textual record
Date
1948-1958
Physical Description
15 cm of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The Housing Committee of UJRA, formally known as the Canadian Jewish Congress Holding Corporation Limited, oversaw the placement of new immigrants temporarily in Congress shelters and in UJRA-owned houses. UJRA bought about thirty houses between 1948 and 1951 to provide low income housing for immigrants. These houses were gradually sold to immigrants, who were required to maintain them as immigrant residences for at least a year. The last of them was sold in 1955, but the Holding Corporation continued its work beyond that time.
Scope and Content
Sub-series consists of minutes, invoices, correspondence, reports and lists created by the Housing Committee of UJRA. The records are arranged in chronological-alphabetical order.
Notes
This sub-series is an amalgamation of former RG 210B and RG 295.
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Ed Sullivan Show in Moscow file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 80; Series 6; File 3; Item 11
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Sylvia Schwartz fonds
European Visits and Events series
Ed Sullivan Show in Moscow file
Level
Item
Fonds
80
Series
6
File
3
Item
11
Material Format
graphic material
Date
Aug. 1959
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (negative) ; 12 x 6 cm
Admin History/Bio
Dick Contino (b. 17 January 1930) was born in Fresno, California and is an American accordionist and singer. Contino studied accordion primarily with San Francisco-based Angelo Cognazzo, and occasionally with Los Angeles-based Guido Deiro. Early on he exhibited great virtuosity on the instrument.
Contino got his big break on December 7, 1947 when he played Lady of Spain (his signature piece) and won first place in the Horace Heidt/Philip Morris talent contest in Fresno which was broadcast on national radio. Contino also won first place in subsequent competitions in Los Angeles, Omaha, Des Moines, Youngstown, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Harrisburg, and New York City. He won first place in the final round on December 12, 1948 in Washington, D.C. Eddie Fisher had much better success with the song in 1952. Contino's song "Yours" was his first hit single. The song reached #27 on the U.S. pop charts in 1954. His second and only other hit single was "Pledge My Love." It reached #42 on the U.S. pop charts in 1957. Contino toured with the Horace Heidt Orchestra and was billed as the "world's greatest accordion player." He appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show a record 48 times.
His success was interrupted when Contino was drafted during the Korean War. Contino, at the time earning a reported $4,000 per week, fled from pre-induction barracks at Fort Ord, due to extreme and unpublicized phobias and neuroses. He was falsely labeled a 'draft dodger' and was jailed for a few months before proudly serving in the United States armed forces and being honorably discharged as a Staff Sergeant and receiving a Presidential Pardon. The resultant scandal dealt Contino's career a serious blow, but he continued performing, including acting in a few movies in the 1950s and 1960s.Contino's acting became known to a new generation in 1991, when "Daddy-O," a low-budget 1958 movie in which he played the starring role as a faddishly-dressed beat rebel and singer, became the centerpiece of an episode of the third season of "Mystery Science Theatre 3000." Contino continues to perform regularly throughout the United States.
Scope and Content
Item consists of a portrait of Dick Contino and Ed Sullivan onstage.
Notes
This item has no proofs. This item shares a negative with F80_s6_f3_i12.
Repro Restriction
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 83
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Ladovsky family fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
83
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Date
[ca. 1890]-2012
Physical Description
3.5 cm of textual records
185 photographs : b&w and col. and sepia toned ( 10 negatives, 4 slides, 3 contact prints) ; 26 x 20 cm or smaller
Admin History/Bio
Aaron Ladovsky (1888-1960) was born in 1888 in Kielce, Poland. He immigrated to Toronto in 1906 at the age of 18. Soon after arriving, Aaron Ladovsky worked to help form a Jewish bakers’ union to advocate for collective rights among Jewish Bakers. In 1911 he married Sarah Eichler who was from his home town of Kielce, Poland. In 1912 he opened the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant at Dundas and Bay Streets (known then as Agnes and Terauley Streets respectively) in the heart of the Ward. That same year, the couple had twin sons, Herman and Samuel, who were born on September 23, 1912.
Only a short time later, in 1920, Aaron moved the location of his restaurant to 338 Spadina Avenue, just north of Dundas. He and his family lived in an apartment upstairs. Herman and Samuel attended Hester How Elementary School until 1919, Lord Lansdowne Public School once the family moved to Spadina, and later Central Commerce. The twins worked in the family business in the 1920s delivering fresh breads and buns by horse cart.
Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913, a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960. His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, his son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over managment. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years, until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years. Today, Philip and Ruth carry on the family tradition of running United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. In May 2012 the restaurant celebrated its 100th anniversary.
Custodial History
The records were donated in multiple small accessions by Herman Ladovsky from 1977 until 2004.
It appears as though previous archivists integrated some materials into a manuscript group relating to Aaron Ladovsky and then later deconstructed a portion of this group into original accessions. Also, a number of periodicals and textual materials from these accessions were integrated into various other manuscript groups and remain there.
One item, a Lord Lansdowne School anniversary booklet which contains a photocopy of Herman's student record, remained in the Aaron Ladovsky manuscript group. This item could not be identified as part of a previous accession, but has been integrated into the fonds as it appears to have been donated by Herman.
Photo #3050 was not associated with an accession number, but documents United Bakers Dairy Restaurant and was likely donated by Herman Ladovsky.
Recent accruals have been donated by Ruth Ladovsky.
Scope and Content
The fonds consists of records documenting the Ladovsky family in Kielce, Poland and Toronto. It is primarily made up of photographs of Ladovsky family members in Kielce and Toronto, and of various organizations that Aaron and Herman were involved in. There are also a few textual records that document the Ladovsky family and their involvement in the Kieltzer Society.
Notes
Newspaper clippings were photocopied and placed in the Aaron Ladovsky vertical file.
Many photographs were originally cited with diifferent numbers. These numbers are mentioned below photo descriptions.
Name Access
Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society (Toronto, Ont.) (subject)
Ladovsky, Aaron, 1888-1960 (creator)
Ladovsky (family)
Ladovsky, Herman, 1912-2002 (creator)
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant (subject)
Related Material
Se MG 2B-1R
See vertical file on Aaron Ladovsky
Arrangement
Records have been organized by media and chronology due to low volume and disparate subject matter. Textual records have been arranged in 17 files. Photographs have been arranged chronologically and are largely described at the item level.
Places
Kensington Market (Toronto, Ont.)
Accession Number
1977-7-5
1978-12-7
1981-1-2
1983-11-6
1988-4-12
1993-10-1
1994-1-3
1999-11-4
2000-4-4
2004-5-21
2004-5-82
2008-4-9
MG 6 E6
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
ID
Fonds 85
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Toronto Hebrew Free Loan Association fonds
Level
Fonds
Fonds
85
Material Format
textual record
Date
1922-1999
Physical Description
6.6 m of textual records
Admin History/Bio
The original Toronto Hebrew Free Loan agency was formed in 1911 under the Associated Hebrew Charities. Its Hebrew name was G'milath Chasodim, which means to do good deeds. Initially all of the loans that it gave out were guaranteed by individuals from the community. This body went into debt in 1917. In 1922, with the administrative support of the Toronto Federation of Jewish Philanthropies and the financial support of B'nai Brith, a new free loan society was established.
The first president was Sam Kronick, the vice president was Nathan Phillips, and the treasurer was Elias Pullan—three extremely high profile citizens within the community and Toronto. The first meeting was held at the Zionist Institute on Beverley Street. By 1923 they had hired a secretary and executive secretary, Moses Oelbaum. The society was incorporated on 12 July 1924. Their mandate was to prevent pauperism and preserve the self respect of individuals. Many of the early loans that came in during that period were through referrals from other Jewish organizations. In 1925, they reviewed 625 applications and approved 510 loans which ranged from $25 to $200, allocating $9307.92 in total. They did not charge interest and had the borrower repay the loan at a rate of $2 to $10 a week.
In 1942 the Moses Oelbaum fund was established with capital of $10,000. Historically, B'nai Brith and the National Council of Women provided the funds for student loans. In 1957, the Scholarship Aid program began to operate under the auspices of the United Jewish Welfare Fund. By 1974, the THLA had given out over 5 million dollars in loans to over 20,000 families. In 1985, through a merger of Toronto's business, personal and educational loan agencies, the Toronto Jewish Free Loan Cassa was formed.
Today, the Loan Cassa has over 700 active clients and gives out over $1,500,000 in loans each year to the needy as well as in the form of scholarships and business start up loans. The rate of defaults has been extremely low, less than one percent. As a result, this program has helped strengthen the community by sustaining and investing in its members. The name was formally changed to Jewish Free Loan Toronto in 2012.
Scope and Content
The records consist of minutes of meetings, correspondence, financial statements, loan ledger books, loan guarantee cards, case files, cash books and receipts, court records relating to trusts and wills and other material.
Name Access
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Access Restriction
Partially closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director prior to accessing some of the records.
Creator
Toronto Jewish Free Loan Association
Accession Number
1986-11/4; MG 201D; 1989-12/2, 1999-7/1; 2004-5/122.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Finance and accounting series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 87; Series 12; File 2
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Finance and accounting series
Level
File
Fonds
87
Series
12
File
2
Material Format
textual record
Date
1933-1938, 1942
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of four reports documenting the JFWB's finances. Included in the reports are details regarding the costs of managing the Scheuer House building and problems encountered due to a low budget. Also included is one copy of the preliminary report of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies Budget Committee for 1934.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Welfare Council of Toronto series
Level
File
ID
Fonds 87; Series 18; File 7
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Jewish Family Welfare Bureau fonds
Welfare Council of Toronto series
Level
File
Fonds
87
Series
18
File
7
Material Format
textual record
Date
1937
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Scope and Content
File consists of textual records documenting the JFWB's involvement on the Welfare Council of Toronto's Committee on Low Wages. Included is correspondence, client lists and meeting notices and minutes.
Access Restriction
Closed. Researchers must receive permission from the OJA Director and the head of Jewish Family and Child prior to accessing the records.
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Carl and Dorothy Frankel photographs file
Level
Item
ID
Fonds 104; File 2; Item 12
Source
Archival Descriptions
Part Of
Frankel and Draper family fonds
Carl and Dorothy Frankel photographs file
Level
Item
Fonds
104
File
2
Item
12
Material Format
graphic material
Date
[ca. 1935]
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 14 x 9 cm
Scope and Content
item is a photograph of Carl Frankel standing on grass in front of a low stone fence or retaining wall. Location is not indicated.
Source
Archival Descriptions
33 records – page 1 of 1.

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