Search Results

New Search Photo Search Audiovisual Search
2099 records – page 1 of 42.
Accession Number
2009-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2009-11-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
2 photographs : b&w ; 9 x 14 cm and 9 X7 cm
1 matchbook
Date
1928-2009
Scope and Content
Accession consists of mementos, family documents and clippings from Nancy Draper (née Frankel). The records include a birth announcement card for Nancy in 1928 and a matchbook party favour from her wedding to Darrell Draper in 1949. There is also a scholarship application letter from the donor's granddaughter, Haley Draper, to UJA. Other records include a staff list from Camp Wabi-Kon in 1946; a Globe and Mail obituary of Dr. Martin Wolfish, a past volunteer of OJA; a photograph of David Steinhauer; a clipping about an Inuit sculpture inspired by the experience of Holocaust survivor Leon Kahn; and three eulogies for Patricia Drevnig Goldstein (1940-2005) (née Jacobs). Patricia was the granddaughter of Rabbi Solomon Jacobs of Holy Blossom, and her mother, Edna, was a Frankel. Finally, the accession includes a photocopy of a photograph of members of the Siglen family of Meaford with Maurice Frankel, the great-uncle of the donor, and Irwin Rosen, ca. 1928.
Administrative History
Nancy Frankel (b. 1928) is the daughter of Carl and Dorothy Jacobs Frankel, past prominent members of the Toronto Jewish community and members of Holy Blossom Temple. Nancy attended Camp Wabi-Kon, a Jewish camp in northern Ontario near Temagami, and then worked there as a teenager. She married Darrell Draper on December 10th, 1949. Nancy is a longtime volunteer at the OJA.
Subjects
Clippings (Books, newspapers, etc.)
Camps
Families
Letters
Obituaries
Name Access
Draper, Nancy
Source
Archival Accessions
Address
216 Beverley Street
Source
Landmarks

The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
Address
216 Beverley Street
Time Period
1918-unknown
Scope Note
The Apter Synagogue was formed by a group of people who came to Toronto from the area of Opatow (Apt) in Poland around the turn of the century. They first established a small synagogue on Centre Avenue near Dundas Street in the Ward. In 1918, in anticipation of more Apter immigrants coming to Toronto after the First World War, the synagogue was sold and a larger one purchased on Beverley Street. Both the synagogue members and the Apter Friendly Society met there.
History
In later years, a bitter controversy between the synagogue and society erupted and the building was sold.
Category
Political
Religious
Private Clubs
Source
Landmarks
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 300 photographs and other material
Date
1906-1983
Scope and Content
The accession includes records documenting the family of Sharon Abron Drache. This includes both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abrons and the Levinters. The material consists of two beta home movie tapes, three DVDs, several photo albums, four artifacts (as well as newspaper clippings), correspondence, certificates, and other material. The donation also includes a book entitled Window on Toronto, a certificate for the Jewish Colonial Trust, examples of Murray Abron's photographs, and a recording of a speech Abba Eban gave at the UN.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David Abramowitz (1884-1963) and Sarah Abramowitz (née Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on March 6, 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001), Oscar (1910-1986), and Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the men’s shop in Union Station. His sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the ladies' shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall, beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially, she practised in Toronto; later, she practiced in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe Levinter (m. Abramowitz) on June, 8, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. These included the Rex Hotel in Toronto, Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945), and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a fifty-fifty partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex Hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex Hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s, he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business, he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography, and storytelling. He died on October 10, 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel Levinter and Rebecca Levinter (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892), Etta (b. 1894), Manny (b. 1895), Isadore (b. 1898), Molly (b. 1900), Rose, and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West, and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942. Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on June 25, 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011), Alfred (1919-1919), Evelyn (1922-2006), Murray (1925-), Molly (1926 -), and Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business, grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate, graduating in 1962, and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction: the Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, the Golden Ghetto, and Barbara Klein Muskrat – Then and Now. She has also published two children's books: the Magic Pot and the Lubavitchers are Coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including the Globe and Mail, the Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report, and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION NOTE: Includes 4 objects, 2 videocassettes (beta-tapes), 3 DVDs, 1 book, and 1 folder of textual records.
ASSOCIATED MATERIAL NOTE: Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
RELATED MATERIAL NOTE: See accessions #2010-12/8 and # 2013-7/15 for addtional records donated by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-1-4
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1924
Scope and Content
Accession consists of an original stock certificate, No. 15, for one share of capital stock of Jewish Publications Limited. It is dated October 1, 1924, cost $15.00, was issued to Mr. F.W.J. Sewell, and is signed by A. D. (Arthur Daniel) Hart, president of the company.
Custodial History
The stock certificate was purchased on 1 October 1924 in Toronto by Frederick William James "Jimmy" Sewell, the grandfather of the donor, who inherited the document and maintained it until it was donated to this archives.
Administrative History
Jewish Publications Limited was founded in Toronto, probably in 1923 or 1924, by Arthur Daniel Hart. The company address was 85 Richmond Street West; Mr. Hart's residence was 1463 King St West. Its sole publication was a book: The Jew in Canada: A Complete Record of Canadian Jewry From the Days of the French Regime to the Present Time. It was compiled by Hart and published in 1926.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-3-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
88 photographs (44 jpgs): b&w ; 12 x 20 cm or smaller and other material
Date
[1922?]-1950
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and films that document the Laufer family and Gordon Laufer's military service during the Second World War. Records include an ISCOR program from the Minsker Synagogue, newspaper clippings relating to Gordon's military service, photographs of Gordon's grade school classes at Lansdowne Public School, early life growing up in the countryside, wedding, and military service overseas, including one of a passover dinner for military personnel. The verso of the scanned photographs were also scanned to show the annotations and dates on the originals. The scanned photographs and documents were originally maintained together in an album. The two parchments likely document Isaac Goldman's membership in the Beizetchiner mutual benefit society. Finally, the films document the wedding of Gordon Laufer's step sister Sylvia Snider to Abe Sapoznik (1950), a passover family dinner (1947) and a family trip to Crystal Beach (1949).
Administrative History
Fanny Laufer, daughter of Isaac and Esther Goldman, was born in Toronto in 1920. Her parents immigrated to Toronto in 1903 from Poland after coming here on their honeymoon. Upon arriving in Toronto, Isaac worked for Eaton’s, but soon opened a dry cleaning and pressing store on Terauley Street, which moved to 469 Dundas Street West in 1922. Fanny married Gordon Laufer (1915-1981) on January 25, 1946 at the Henry Street shul.
Gordon served in the Irish Regiment of Canada during the Second World War. He originally found work as a furrier, but later worked for the liquor board. Together, he and Fanny had two daughters; Gloria (b. 1947) and Sandy (b.1950). Gordon passed away in 1981 and Gloria passed away in recent years.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description Note: Includes 5 scanned documents (jpg), 2 parchments, 3 film reels (ca. 20 min.), and 1 folder of textual records.
Language note:Parchments are in Yiddish
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-4-2
Material Format
object
graphic material
Physical Description
3 objects
32 photographs
Date
[ca. 1906]-[ca. 1970]
Scope and Content
The records include three medals that were awarded to Private Samuel Sterin (J-5639) by the British government for his service during the First World War. They include the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the Service at the Front Medal.
The accession also consists of 32 photographs documenting the family of the donor. This includes the following families: Sterin, Coldofsky, Horowitz, Chaplin and Novak.
Custodial History
The records belonged to Sarah Sterin Harvey, who is in a home for the aged in Arizona. Since she doesn't have any family left, Sarah entrusted her family treasures to her friend Molly Rose who passed them on to the OJA.
Administrative History
The Sterin family came from Kiev Russia to Canada during the 1880s. The first arrivals were two brothers Abe and Sam (b. 1886). Abe was a furrier who married Jenny. Sam, who became an upholsterer, married Leah Horowitz and they had two children: Sarah (m. Harvey), who was born in 1927, and Morris (Maurice). Maurice served in the Canadian military during the Second World War. Sarah married James Harvey in Los Angeles in 1972. Neither of the siblings had children. Maurice currently lives in Las Vegas.
The Horowitz family came from Palestine to Toronto during the 1920s. Leah's sister Rose married Percy and they had two children. Eva Horowitz married David Novak and they had one daughter, Honey.
Jack Sterin (b. 1890) was another brother who settled in the United States. He served in the United States military during World War One and became a musician. He played the cello for the Philadelphia Orchestra and died at the age of 43.
His sister Simi Sterin married Sam Coldofsky, who was a barber. He ran the Model Barber Shop at 336 Spadina Avenue. They had three children: Sarah (m. Dacks), Arthur (who changed his name to Coldoff) and David. Arthur (b. 1913) fought during the First World War and was killed in Pontecorvo, Italy on 2 May 1944. His brother David became a musician.
Jack's other sister was Rose Chaplin. She was married to Meyer Chaplin. He worked as a furrier in Toronto. They had nine children: Harold, Charles, Irwin, Norman, Lil, Joan, Sarah, Ruth and Dorothy. Dorothy was institutionalized as a child. Ruth, who was a twin with Norman, passed away at a young age. Lil married Ben and they had 3 girls: Helen, Karen and Nora who were born in the 1940s.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-2
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph (jpg) : sepia toned
Date
[ca. 1922]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of Syd Wise and his siblings in front of Anshel Wise's cigar store and "steamship office" at 100 Dundas Street West at the northwest corner of Terauley Street. Seen from left to right are: Syd Wise, Lil Wise, and David Wise.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Places
Dundas Street West (Toronto, Ont.)
Teraulay Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
65 Photographs : b&w (jpg)
3 scanned documents (jpg)
Date
1925-1945, predominant 1940-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual records that document Roy Waisberg's childhood and later his experiences as an airplane electrician in the Royal Canadian Air Force during during the Second World War. Included are photographs of Waisberg on leave and repairing airplanes in Europe, as well as a certificate of service and a Description of Person record. The verso of scanned photographs were also scanned to show the annotations and dates on the originals. The photographs were originally maintained together in two separate albums by the donor.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Related Material Note: for Roy's account of his war experiences see oral history 369
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-18
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
3 photographs : b&w
1 folder textual records
1 poster
Date
[ca. 1920]-[ca. 1955]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of material documenting the career of Louis Herman. It includes music programs dating from around 1920 until 1939, bulletins, the Y-Times (1938 & 1942) as well as correspondence, newsletters, skits, music and programs from the war years. Finally, it includes a poster as well as three photographs of Louis Herman taken during the course of his career.
Custodial History
The material was donated to the OJA by Louis' son.
Administrative History
Louis Herman was born on 4 January 1911. His father, Reverand Samuel Herman, was a cantor who first worked in Montreal and then moved with his family to Toronto. They lived at 20 Major Street during the 1920s and 1930s.
Louis was a child prodigy who studied under Cantor Yossele Rosenblatt. He established a music career as a boy, singing soprano with the synagogue choir and later performing on the Maxwell Coffee Hour in the United States, which was hosted by the New York Jewish radio station WEVD.
During the 1920s and 1930s he sang professionally and performed at a variety of venues, entertaining Jewish organizations and groups in Toronto. He also performed outside of the city at that time in the American mid-west and the northeast.
After the start of the war, Louis enlisted and became a private in the Canadian Army. He entertained the troops, appearing in stage shows in Canada and overseas, often appearing with famous acts like Wayne and Shuster. He also saw combat duty.
After the war he returned to Canada and studied at the Royal Conservatory of Music. After completing his studies, he decided to become a cantor like his father. He married Yetta and moved with their children to Camden, New Jersey in 1957 in order to serve as the cantor to Congregation Beth El. They lived there until the late 1960s, when the the synagogue was relocated to Cherry Hill. Cantor Herman retired in 1982. He passed away on December 16, 2004. His son David is the Rabbi Shaarei Tfiloh in Baltimore.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: also see accession 2007-3-6.
Subjects
Entertainers
Name Access
Herman, Louis
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm and 13 x 21 cm
Date
1925-[194-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of two photographs of Bernstein family members. One documents a women's meeting at a home on 678 Crawford Street. Second from left is Esther (Ettie) Bernstein and beside her is Eva Norris. The other photograph is labelled: Organization Meeting of the United Jewish Farmers of Ontario, Holy Blossom Synagogue, March 25, 1925. This photograph has a number of individuals identified on it, including: Dr. Brickner, Hon. Pres.; S. Samuels, Vice Pres.; H. Shackman, Treas.; M. Berman, Executive; S. Levine, Secty; M. Borinsky, Executive; J. Smith, Executive; M. Borenstein, Executive. A member of the donor's family started to identify individuals by marking the photograph with pen. These include Moishe Yukel Bernstein (the donor's great-grandfather), Isadore Bernstein (his grandfather), Tom White, Alta Crystal, Mr. Samuels, Mr. Krupinsky & Saul Crystal.
Subjects
Farmers
Places
Crawford Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-5-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
object
Physical Description
5 cm textual records and other material
Date
1923-1950, predominant 1942-1950
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records that document Leonard's activities as a bomber in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War as well as his activities in the immediate post-war years. Textual records include letters written by Leonard to his family during the war in which he discusses such things as his fellow servicemen, the contents of parcels received from his family, his responsibilities as second navigator, and his plans for upcoming leave's of absence. Also included is Leonard's Royal Canadian Air Force flying log book (1943-1948).
Scrapbook contains photographs of Leonard's childhood and wartime experience, such as, images of his airforce crew and fellow servicemen on leave. Scrapbook also contains images of Leonard's family and friends from the post-war era, as well as some textual records, including Leonard's wartime identity card, will and map of Germany.
Administrative History
Leonard was born in Toronto on March 3, 1923 to Samuel and Rebecca (nee Rottenberg) Berger. He served in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a bomber during the Second World War and married Goldie Fine in 1950.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 scrapbook, 1 RCAF flying log book, and 1 RCAF patch.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-14
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-14
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
16 photographs : b&w (jpg)
2 textual records (pdf)
Date
[ca. 1910] - [ca. 1955]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs and textual records that document the professional activities of members of the Natanson family and their family life. Photographs include images of the family's pickle business (ca. 1910) and store Moffat's North York Bargain House (ca. 1955), portraits of Nathan Natanson with his violin (ca. 1925) and Albert Natanson in his tap dancing outfit (ca. 1925), as well as images of Ida Natanson as a nurse (1938) and childhood photographs of Lazar and Bob. Textual records include a brochure for Nathan's dancing school and a notice announcing the employment of Albert at Helwig & Leitch, Inc.
Administrative History
Originally from Romania, Benjamin and Rose (nee Gratz) Natanson immigrated to Ottawa in 1902 and eventually settled in Toronto in 1905. Benjamin owned a pickle company at 3242 Dundas Street West which he operated until it was destroyed in a fire on August 13, 1930.
Benjamin and Rose had six children together: Albert (b. 1900), Freida (b. 1902), Celia (b. 1905), Nathan (b. 1909), Ida (b. 1916) and Lazar (b. 1918). Three of their children were involved in the arts; Celia and Nathan were both musicians and Albert was a tap dancer. At 15 years of age, Nathan won a scholarship at the Institute of Musical Art (now known as the Julliard School) and moved to New York with Celia and Freida. As a child, Albert was a tapdancer in Showboat on Broadway and later operated his own dancing school in Montreal; Nat Anson's Dancing School.
Ida became one of the first Jewish nurses in Ontario. She moved to Saskatchewan after marrying Doctor Nathan Jacks. Lazar married Muriel Weinstein (b. 1923) in 1951 and they opened a store, Moffat's North York Bargain House, at 1291 Wilson Avenue that same year. They were likely one of the first Jewish families to move to the Downsview area. Lazar and Muriel had two children: Eileen and Bob.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-21
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-21
Material Format
object
Physical Description
1 glass jar : glass ; 8 cm in diam. x 15 cm in height
Date
[ca. 1930]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a clear glass jar with a star of David, the company name "Toronto Hebrew Association of Butter Dealers," and the price of the jar (5 cents) embossed on it.
Custodial History
This item was found in the reading room.
Administrative History
Jewish dairymen banded together to form the Toronto Hebrew Association of Butter Dealers for commercial protection and co-operative action; a counterpart by independent merchants to the trade union movement. These bottles contained a variety of dairy products (usually butter and sour cream) and were returnable for 5 cents.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: for additional Toronto Hebrew Association of Butter Dealers glass jars see accession 1985-8-2 and Fonds 22. These are all 10 cm in height.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-3
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records
Date
1911-1949
Scope and Content
The accession includes a variety of items such as a bound volume of the Toronto UJWF annual reports (1940-1949), a hagadah from 1911 used by Sol Eisen, a first edition volume of the Naomi Cook Book (1928), ketubot for Sol and Rebecca Eisen and Ethel Soloway to Ben Litvack and scrapbook and diaries produced by Sol Eisen (1915-1943). The scrapbooks include many clippings documenting his own accomplishments, family simchas or other topics that were of interest to him. The diaries are mostly hand written and detail his thoughts and activities from the time that he was a student until he was employed with the Canada Life Assurance Company.
Custodial History
The donor is Sol Eisen's son. He gave Steve Speisman the diaries and scrapbooks to microfilm in 1979 and the OJA has had those copies in their holdings since that time. A copy of the microfilm was also provided to the Multicultural History Society of Ontario.
Administrative History
Sol Eisen was born in Toronto on 15 February 1898. He was the son of Abraham and Nettie (Baker) Eisen. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto. It was there that he established the Menorah Society in 1917. He graduated in 1918. He then completed a post-graduate degree at Harvard (1919) and completed his law studies at Osgoode Law School (1921).
Soon after completing his studies, he married Rebecca Dunkelman on 14 June 1922. The wedding took place at Holy Blossom and was officiated by Rabbi Brickner. The couple had three children: Morton, Annette (m. Yolles) and Gloria (m. Baskin).
He initially worked as a barister and had an office within the Dominion Bank Building at Queen and Bay. In 1936 he was offered a position with the Canada Life Assurance Company. He became one of their leading sellers in North America. He served on the board of the companies Millionaire's Club for many years.
Eisen was very involved in the Jewish community as well. He was a member of the Primrose Club, the Island Yacht Club, the Palestine Lodge and the Holy Blossom Brotherhood. He assisted in the formation of the Federation of Jewish Philanthropies of Toronto as well as the Canadian Jewish Congress. In fact, he attended the first CJC meeting in Montreal in 1919 as a Toronto delegate. He was also one of the founders of JIAS.
Outside of the community he was involved in and was a founder and president of the Forest Hill Lion's Club (1954) and was active in the Masons, the ROM and the Toronto Board of Trade.
Eisen was also an avid collector of Canadiana. His holdings included books, pamphlets, printed ephemera from across the country. He passed away in 1974 and left his collection or rare books and other items to the University of Waterloo.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: see accession 1979-9/38 for the microfilm version of the scrapbooks and diaries.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-18
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-18
Material Format
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
222 photographs (negatives, prints, jpg) : col. and b&w ; 18 x 13 cm and smaller
Date
[191-]-[ca. 1970]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs which document the Gilbert family and Gilbert Studios. Photographs of the Gilbert family are predominately portraits of Nina and the children during the 1920s and 1930s. The Gilbert Studios material largely consist of portraits of members of the Jewish community and fashion and wedding photographs. Also included in the accession are both negatives and a print of the Elite Studios storefront taken in 1923. Other notable photograph subjects in the accession include the B. Sherman Hardware storefront, Lou and Nat Turofsky, Harry Sonshine, Leon Weinstein, J. Irving Oelbaum, and Alex Levinsky. All images in the accession are black and white except for a print of Nathan Phillips.
Custodial History
The photographs were donated in 2008 and notes indicate that the archivist was awaiting documentation from Jack Gilbert. Since that time, some materials have been returned to the donor upon request. Previous archivists placed the negatives in acid-free envelopes and scanned a portion of the material. The original conservation report for the glass negatives completed in 2008 evaluated 42 glass negatives, but only 26 remain in this accession.
Administrative History
Nachman "Nathan" Gittelmacher was born in Kiev, Ukraine in 1898, the son of Shloima and Mattie Gittelmacher. Suffering terribly during the pogroms of 1918 and 1920, he fled from place to place and then emigrated to Canada in 1921. Trained as a photographer in Europe, he opened his own photography studio in Toronto in 1922, called Elite Studios. First located at 513 Queen Street West, he soon moved to 615 Queen Street West. Nathan serviced a largely Jewish clientele, photographing weddings, bar mitzvahs, as well as Jewish community events.
Nathan was married to Nina Sokoloff and they had three sons and a daughter: Louis ("Lou"), Albert ("Al"), Jack, and Ruth.
During the early 1940s, the family legally changed their name from Gittelmacher to Gilbert and subsequently altered the name of the business to Gilbert Studios. When Nathan moved to the United States, Al, who had been working there since a young age, took over the business and under his management it thrived. In order to accommodate his growing clientele, he moved the studio to Eglinton Avenue and later to 170 Davenport Road, where it is situated today.
Al made a name for himself as a portrait photographer, using natural light in innovative ways to create more natural looking portraits. Al’s primary work involved producing portraits of families, weddings, bar mitzvahs, special events, and dinners. Most of his early clients were from the Jewish community. In turn, he also was paid to produce portraits of local entrepreneurs, and his multi-year contract with the city gave him sole responsibility for the production of portraits of the mayors and councilmen and women. He later branched out beyond the Jewish community, and began to produce images of businessmen and leaders from the Italian community in Toronto.
In addition to the paid contracts involving local personalities and groups, Al Gilbert has produced many artistic portraits of local, national, and international celebrities as well as artists and leaders such as Wayne and Shuster, Howie Mandel, Oscar Peterson, Frank Sinatra, Duke Ellington, Robertson Davies, several Canadian prime ministers, Prince Charles, Israel's prime ministers (these portraits were made into stamps by Israel's government), and, finally, the last pope. Gilbert’s work therefore captures a huge range of individuals from the ordinary bride to extraordinary world leaders.
Al has won many awards as well as accolades from his peers throughout his career. He is the three-time recipient of the prestigious Professional Photographers of Canada (PPOC) Photographer of the year honour. He has been named Fellow of the photographic societies in Canada, Britain and the United States. In 1990, he was awarded the Order of Canada. In January 2007, the Professional Photographers of America presented him with their Lifetime Achievement Award. This award is the highest honor PPA can bestow on a person for their body of work and influence on professional photography.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: see fonds 37 and accessions 2007-12-17, 2007-12-18, 2008-4-7, 2008-6-12, 2009-5-2, 2009-7-8
Subjects
Commercial photography
Families
Name Access
Gilbert Studios
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-5
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
47 photographs : b&w and hand col. ; 18 x 22 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1918]-[ca. 1960]
Scope and Content
The accession consists of 47 photographs documenting the Pascowitz and Grossman families.
Custodial History
The records were sent to the OJA by Debby Shocket at the JAHSENA archives in Edmonton. She received them from an individual who picked them up at a garage sale and didn't know which family they documented. Debby could see they were from Toronto and asked if we would like them. A number of the original images were given to the donor, since he didn't have many photographs of his family and they were similar to other images in this donation.
Administrative History
Gimpel (Yacob) and Rivka Pascowitz came to Canada from Poland in 1903 and 1905 respectively. He arrived first to set up residence and then sent for his wife and seven children a couple years later. Their last child, Morris, was born in Toronto in 1907. They lived at 138 Elizabeth Street in the Ward. Gimpel ran a delicatessen below their home and served as Gabbai of Beth Jacob Congregation on Henry Street. Their son Charles was born around 1900. He enlisted in the Royal Fusilliers, where he served as a sapper in Egypt during the First World War. His regiment was part of the Jewish Legion. When he returned he worked for Canadian National as a telegraph operator transmitting messages in Morse code.
The Grossman daughters, Anna (m. Pascowitz), Ruth (m. Godfrey) and Esther, arrived from Galicia in June 1921. The family sent the three eldest girls to Toronto after their grandfather had been murdered during a pogrom in the spring of 1921. At that time they were 21, 19 and 20 respectively. They stayed with their aunt, Annie (Grossman), and uncle Charles Goodman, who lived at 190 Seaton Street. Esther found a job as a fur finisher with J. Schwartz & Co. on Queen Street West. She later worked for Schipper, Freifeld furriers on Spadina Avenue. Anne located a job at the Biltmore Hat Factory. Ruth trained as a bookkeeper and found a job with Okun Brothers Ltd., millinery manufacturers on York Street. The rest of the family, including their parents Moses and Rose, arrived many years later. Their brother, David Grossman, immigrated to Toronto in February 1927 and found work as an upholsterer. Their parents, Moses and Rose, came three years later in March 1930 with the youngest child Rivkah (m. Agranove).They lived with Anne after their arrival and later moved in with their unmarried daughters and resided at 490 Euclid Avenue. Moses died in 1939 and Rose in 1972.
Charles Pascowitz and Anna Grossman married in Toronto on 8 February 1925. The couple had two children: Gilbert (b. 1925) and Herbert (b. 1927). The family moved to the east end of Toronto during the 1930s after Charlie lost his job with the CNR. They lived at 340 Kingston Road and opened a grocery store on the ground floor. Charlie was active in the Beach shul and served as a voluntary Hazzan, leading services. The kids attended Norway Public School. During his youth, Herb worked as a delivery boy for a grocery store. He later became a lifeguard as a later teen at B'nai Brith Camp and Camp Kitonim at Balfour Beach. Both boys served in the ROTC during the Second World War. Herbert attended the University of Toronto and completed his BSc in 1949 and his medical degree in 1953. He became a psychiatrist. Gilbert attended the University of Toronto as well and later interned in New York and became a pediatrician. He married Sandra Posen and the couple settled in Brantford. They had five children.
Herbert married his first wife Shirley Weinberg. She later changed her first name to Eve. The couple had four boys: Jonathan (b. 1954), Ron (b. 1957), Andrew (b. 1962) and Dan (b. 1964). They moved to Edmonton. After the couple divorced in 1975, Eve and the boys returned to Toronto. Herbert married Marilyn Berg in 1977.
Charlie Pascoe passed away in December 1970 and Anne several years later in March of 1977.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1909-1939
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records that document Sam's involvement in the Russian army and his immigration to Canada. Included is a copy of his naturalization certificate (1919), a JIAS shipping receipt for a package sent to Russia (1939), Russian army documents, and a temporary Russian passport (1914).
Administrative History
Sam Levine was born in Postov, Vilna, Russia on April 10th, 1885 to Mr. and Mrs. Eliahu Levine. Prior to immigrating to Canada, he received training as a blacksmith in the Russian army and had two daughters with his wife Sarah (d. 1968): Bessie (b. 1909) and Betty (b. 1913). His wife and daughters joined him in Canada around 1921; a year after he became a naturalized Canadian. After their arrival, Sam and his wife had two more daughters: Ethel (b. 1922) and Sylvia (b. 1924).
The Levine family resided at 11 Euclid and owned a stable at 22 Euclid, which Sam used as a place to shoe horses for profit. Throughout his career, Sam took on various metal work jobs, including building gates for residences and cemeteries, such as Roselawn Lambton. He often did the metal work at home and soldered the completed pieces together on site. During the Second World War, Sam had a contract with Lincoln Electric to build casings for motors.
Sam was part of the Grand Order of Israel and Sarah was a member of Folks Farein. Sam taught himself how to read English, and regularly frequented horse races. Sam passed away in 1976.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: some documents are in Russian and Yiddish
Related material note: see also accession #1988-11-12.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-8-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-8-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
textual record (electronic)
Physical Description
1 DVD
Date
1921 - [ca. 1948]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of one scanned document (the birth certificate of Jacob Offstein) and four digital images of family photographs taken during the 1940s.
Custodial History
The photographs and certificate were scanned by the donor and were sent to us on a DVD.
Administrative History
Jacob Offstein (b. 1871) was born in Minsk, Russia. He married Gussie meyer in 1898. He came to Canada around 1904 and settled in St. Catharines, Ontario. He sent for his wife and three kids in 1908. They had several more children after that time. Their offspring included: David (b. 1899), Edward (b. 1900), Harry (Bunny) (b. 1902), Bertha (b. 1908), Hattie (b. 1910), Norman (b. 1914), Michael and Samuel (b. 1917). Unfortunately, their youngest died in 1918, due to what was described in the death certificate as a result of "scalding". The family resided at 11 Queenston Street during the early years where Jacob worked as a junk dealer. The family later moved to 24 Queenston Street where Jacob toiled as a grocer and junk dealer. On 31 August, 1921, Jacob was hit by a street car and perished at the age of 47.
Many of the children remained in Ontario. David married Ida. Harry married Eve. Edward married Edna and they had two daughters: Honey and Dena. Norman and his wife Belle relocated to California after the Second World War. They had two children: Gerald (b. 1941) and Gary (b. 1945). Gerald married Elaine Katz and Gary married Louis Nathanson. Gerald had one son, Norman (b. 1969), whom he named after his father, who passed away in July of 1965 in Los Angeles.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-20
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-6-20
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
16 photographs : b&w ; 17 x 25 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
1916-1950
Scope and Content
Accession consists of sixteen copies of photographs of the employees and owners of Gryfe Bakery. Also included is an internet print out of the family/bakery history. Individuals identified in photographs include Sam Gryfe (1889-1967), Reuben Gryfe (1918-2007), Arthur Gryfe (b. 1936), Benjamin Morris Gryfe (1919-1997), Bill Gryfe (1910-2005), Polly (Hoffman) Gryfe (1911-1980), with sons Cyril Gyrfe (b. 1933) and Arthur Gryfe (1935-2009), Saul "Srul" Reuben (1923-1997). Photos are taken at various locations including 319 Augusta Avenue and 4 Fitzroy Terrace in Toronto's Kensington Market, 243 Havelock Street, Toronto, and Hamilton.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-1
Material Format
object
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
2 objects
3 photographs : b&w and col. (1 negative) ; 10 x 12 cm or smaller
1 folder of textual records
Date
[ca. 1920]-[193-]
Scope and Content
This accession consists of two nursing uniforms worn by Frances Kadish during her career at Mount Sinai Hosptial in Chicago, Ill. The uniforms are made of denim and include a hat, collar and apron. One uniform has a Mount Sinai crest on the sleeve. The photographs include a copy of Frances Kadish in her nursing uniform, possibly a graduation photo, as well as a copy photograph of an original painting of Frances in her uniform, and a third negative of Frances with her husband and two sons in Kirkland Lake, Ontario. The accesion also consists of one composition book from nursing school in Chicago.
Custodial History
The records were in the custory of Sid Kadish, the son of Frances Atkins, until they were donated to the archives on September 3, 2010.
Administrative History
Frances Kadish (nee Atkins) was born in 1903 in Toronto to Henry and Sarah Atkins. She was one of seven children raised on Gerrard Street where her parents owned a candy shop. In the early 1920s, Frances moved to Chicago to attend nursing school at Mount Sinai Hospital. She graduated in the spring of 1927 and that autumn married Hyman "Kay" Kadish in Chicago on 26 September 1927. The couple immediately relocated to Toronto where they were remarried in a traditional Jewish ceremony at the urging of Frances' mother. Frances and Kay had three children: Joseph (b. 17 Aug. 1928, Toronto), Marion (b. 6 Dec. 1929, Hamilton) and Sid (b. 21 June 1934, Kirkland Lake).
Kay went on to work with Thuna herbalists, first in Toronto and then in Hamilton, while Frances briefly worked at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto from late 1927 to 1928. The couple later moved to Kirkland Lake in the early 1930s where they remained until moving to Barrie in the 1960s. Following the death of her husband in 1968, Frances relocated with her son Sid and his family to Guleph in 1971 and then to Burlington in 1984.
Throughout her life, Frances was very active in various hospital ladies' auxiliaries, setting up library carts in both the Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie and St. Joseph's Hospital in Guelph. She passed away on 21 March 1988 in Dundas, Ontario at the age of 85.
Descriptive Notes
Atkins, Frances
Kadish, Frances
Mount Sinai Hospital
Kirkland Lake
Name Access
Kadish, Frances, 1903-1988
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-9-3
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
11 photographs : b&w and sepia toned ; 20 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1920] - 1959
Scope and Content
Accesssion consists of Dr. Sydney Wise's class photographs from Orde Street School (ca. 1920) and Jarvis Collegiate Institute (1931). Also included is a photograph of the University of Toronto's Alpha Epsilon Phi sorority (ca. 1935), of which Dr. Wise's wife, Mimi Marin, was a member. There are also class photographs of Dr. Wise's children from Holy Blossom Temple's religious school (1957-1959) and a group photograph of the West Prep Orchestra (1957-1958). Finally, accession contains a photograph from the Marin family's New Year's Eve party (ca. 1927). Identified are Max Enkin (seated at the botton right) and Sonia and Joe Marin (seated and standing behind Enkin).
Custodial History
Records were donated by Sydney Wise
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-4
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
ca. 90 cm of textual records
1 scrapbook
ca. 24 photographs : b&w and col. (17 jpg)
Date
[ca. 1907] - 2008
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs and textual material that document Morley Wolfe’s community involvement and personal and professional life. Personal records include photographs of Morley and his family, correspondence with family and friends, his marriage certificate and school diplomas.
Professional records include his curriculum vitae, photographs, reports, correspondence, nomination letters for various awards, such as the Order of Canada, news clippings, certificates and awards, newsletters, event invitations and records documenting his involvement in a court case between the Ontario Deputy Judges Association and the Attorney General of Ontario. Also included are scanned photographs of Morley presenting an award to Rosa Parks (1999), receiving his Ontario Senior Achievement award (2000), and meeting with Jean Chrétien (2001).
Accession also includes one scrapbook documenting Morley's term as national president of BBC. Finally, accession contains records documenting the various appeals filed against BBC by Wolfe, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 and CMOBBC, such as, the appeal notices filed with BBI’s Court of Appeal, correspondence, various BBC constitutions and by-laws, Wilson Heights Lodge executive meeting minutes, CMOBBC newsletters, and news clippings.
Administrative History
Morley S. Wolfe was born in Winnipeg in 1928 to Cecil (b. 1895) and Betty (nee Davidow) Wolfe. He spent his early childhood in various cities in Saskatchewan and Manitoba until moving to Toronto in 1940. Soon after graduating from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1955 he started his own practice as a senior member of the law firm Burt, Burt, Wolfe and Bowman. In 1971 he was appointed Queen’s Council, and from 1973 to 1977 he served as counsel for B’nai Brith Canada. After his retirement from practice in 1993, the Province of Ontario appointed him presiding Justice of the Peace for Ontario and Deputy Judge in Small Claims Court.
His first marriage was to Sandra Newman in 1958 and they had three children together: Leslie, Lee, and Melanie. He later married Joan and became the step-father to her daughter, Erin.
Throughout his life Morley was passionate about fighting prejudice and discrimination and became involved with organizations, such as the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews and the Urban Alliance on Race Relations. He was also a member of the Toronto Police Services Board Committee on Race Relations, served as Chair of the North York Committee on Community, Race and Ethnic Relations, and was appointed to the Canadian Multiculturalism Council. In addition, he was the founding president of Toronto Residents in Partnership (TRIP) from 2003 to 2006.
His involvement extended to Jewish organizations. He served as National President of B’nai Brith Canada (BBC) from 1982 to 1983 and was a founding member of its League for Human Rights. He was also President of BBC’s Toronto Regional Council and Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998, and of the Jewish Camp Council of Toronto as well as many other organizations.
Morley’s hard work and involvement in the community earned him many awards, including, City of Toronto’s William P. Hubbard Race Relations Award, the YMCA Canada Peace Medal, B’Nai Brith Canada Service Award, and the Province of Ontario’s Senior Achievement Award.
Around 2002, Wilson Heights Lodge No. 1998 began filing a series of appeals with B’nai Brith International (BBI) over concerns that BBC’s national executive was governing undemocratically. Morley played a key role in filing these appeals and was the centre of one appeal filed after BBC censured him without advance notice or the opportunity for a hearing. These appeals were not all successful.
Around 2006, Morley became involved in another appeal against BBC that was filed by a group of members who called themselves the Concerned Members of B’nai Brith Canada (CMOBBC). They alleged that BBC’s national executive had too much centralized power, was not governing transparently, failed to provide members with audited financial statements at multiple annual general meetings (AGMs), passed a constitution that members had defeated at the 2005 AGM, and was threatening and harassing some members. BBI’s appeal court rendered its verdict in 2007 in favour of BBC. Soon after this judgment was made BBC took steps to expel all the members of CMOBBC. In response, Morley resigned from the organization.
Morley currently resides in Brampton.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-10-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
2 photographs: b & w ; 9 x 14 cm
Date
1922
Scope and Content
The donation includes two photographs that were taken at Gittelmacher's Studio in 1922. The first is a portrait of Leona, Ida and Albert Lenchner from Pittsburgh. The second is a portrait of Albert and Leona Lenchner with their cousin Bernard Segal, who was also from Pittsburgh.
Subjects
Portraits
Places
Pittsburgh (Pa.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-1
Material Format
textual record
textual record (electronic)
graphic material
Physical Description
2 textual records
2 textual records (digital)
24 photographs: b&w ; 19 x 24 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1913]-1967
Scope and Content
Accession includes two passports that belonged to Mina and Abraham Sprachman. It also consists of a scanned images of the wedding invitation for the Fanny Sprachman and Jacob Caller nuptuals and 24 photographs documenting the Sprachman family. Finally, it incliudes a letter written by Chester Sprachman, the son of Lena and Jake Sprachman, to his cousin in Chicago.
Administrative History
Hyman (Chaim) Sprachman (b. 1856) arrived in Toronto at the end of the nineteenth century with his eldest son Benjamin (b. 1877), who was twenty at the time. They both worked as peddlars and resided in a boarding home for a while. Hyman sent for his family in Austria and they arrived in 1904. His family included his wife Sheindel and children Rebecca (b. 1887), Lena (b. 1891), Fanny (b. 1892) and Abraham (b. 1894). The family originally lived at 30 Gerrard and then relocated to 123 Baldwin around 1914. Abraham became a prominent architect and married his cousin Mina Sprachman (b. 1900) in 1921. They had two children: Mendel and Sheila. Mandel followed in his father's footsteps and also became a nationally recognized and acclaimed architect. Both specialized in theatre design and renovations.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: See see accession 1979-4/2 for an early photograph of the Sprachman family.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-8
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 11 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[ca. 1905] - 1989
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records, photographs and audio-visual material documenting Sharon Abron Drache's family and career. Family records document both sides of her family: the Abramowitz/Abron and Levinters. Family records include correspondence, invitations, photographs, five beta tapes of home movies, certificates, newsclippings, family genealogy trees and one scrapbook. Professional records include Sharon's curriculum vitae, newsclippings and a manuscript of Sharon's unpublished novel entitled, Weekend Commute.
Custodial History
The records were in the custody of Sharon Abron Drache. She has interherited the family photos and documents from both sides of her family.
Administrative History
Murray Abramowitz was born in 1912 in Toronto. His parents were David (1884-1963) and Sarah (nee Winfield) (1885-1955). David arrived in Toronto in 1906. Sarah and her parents, Jacob and Anna, settled in Scranton, Pennsylvania around 1880. Jacob worked as a grocer and relocated his family to Toronto around 1894. Sarah and David were married at the McCaul Street Synagogue in Toronto on 6 March 1906. They resided at 159 York Street after their nuptials. The couple had three children: Rose (1907-2001); Oscar (1910-1986); Murray (1912-2005). David's father, Shevach, served as the lay cantor at the First Roumanian Hebrew Congregation (now Adath Israel). David owned the Men’s shop in the Union Station and his sister, Sophie Abramowitz, ran the Ladies shop. The shops were located on the east end of the Great Hall beneath the composite glass windows. Rose Abron Lahman became a physician, specializing in obstetrics and gynecology. Initially she practised in Toronto and then in Atlanta, Georgia. Rose graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto when there were quotas for both women and Jews.
Murray married Edythe (née Levinter) on 8 June, 1941. The event took place at the bride's family's home above their furniture store, J. Levinter Ltd, at 1169 Bloor Street West. The couple had one child, Sharon Abron Drache. Murray began using the Abron surname during the 1940s, changing it legally in the 1950s.
During his life, Murray worked as an hotelier and ran several businesses. They included the Rex Hotel in Toronto and Tent City at Lake Simcoe (ca. 1935-1945) and the St. Lawrence Hotel in Port Hope (1949-1955). When Murray managed the Rex Hotel he was a 50/50 partner with his mother's brother-in-law, Leo Hertzman. Leo owned and managed the store, United Clothing, which fronted the Rex hotel on Queen Street at the south side of the beverage room. When Leo’s son Harold Hertzman returned from military service in 1945, Leo bought out Murray’s share in the business for Harold. Jack Ross and Morris Meyers purchased the hotel from the Hertzmans in 1951. Murray was also a co-owner of the Tent City business with his father, David Abramowitz, coinciding with his Rex hotel years. During the late 1950s he worked as a real estate broker in Toronto and Florida. From the 1960s to the early 1970s he worked in his mother-in-law’s furniture business, J. Levinter Ltd. After Murray retired from the furniture business he became a stock broker. His hobbies included fishing, photography and storytelling. He died on 10 October 2005.
The Levinter family was headed by Samuel and Rebecca (née Godfried). They were both born in Austria (Galicia) and came to Canada in their teens. After their marriage in 1890, they resided in St. John's Ward. The couple had seven children: Jacob (b. 1892); Etta (b. 1894); Manny (b. 1895); Isadore (b. 1898); Molly (b. 1900); Rose and Dolly. Isadore became a prominent Toronto lawyer and was the first Jew appointed as a bencher at the Law Society of Upper Canada.
Samuel established Levinter Furniture in 1890. The business was initially located at 401-405 Queen Street. By 1925 Samuel had relocated his store to 287 Queen Street West and his son Jacob had opened a second location at 1169 Bloor Street West. Jacob later expanded his location to 1171 Bloor Street West. Samuel died on April 30, 1942; Rebecca died in 1952. Jacob married Sara Kamin (b. 1894, Lodz, Poland) on 25 June 1916. They had six children: Edythe (1918 -2011); Alfred (1919-1919); Evelyn (1922-2006); Murray (1925-); Molly (1926 -); Florence (b. 1930-). Jacob died of a heart attack in 1944. After his death, Sara took his place as owner and manager of the family business grooming her son Murray to succeed her. Sara’s daughter Molly had an early career as a concert pianist in Toronto and New York. Sara died in Toronto in 1990.
Sharon Abron Drache attended Forest Hill Collegiate (g. 1962) and then completed an undergraduate degree and post-graduate diploma in Psychology at the University of Toronto, the latter from the Institute of Child Study. She was enrolled as a special student in the Department of Religion at Carleton University from 1974-78. She has published four books of adult fiction, The Mikveh Man, Ritual Slaughter, The Golden Ghetto, Barbara Klein Muskrat – then and now, and two children's books, The Magic Pot and The Lubavitchers are coming to Second Avenue. She has also worked as a literary journalist and book reviewer for several newspapers and journals including, The Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Books in Canada, the Glebe Report and the Ottawa and Western Jewish Bulletins.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Physical description note: Includes 1 scrapbook, ca. 8 photographs, 5 beta-tapes, and 4 DVDs.
Associated Material Note: please see Sharon Drache's fonds at Library and Archives Canada and at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto for material related to her literary career. Please see Sharon Drache's fonds at the Ottawa Jewish Archives for material related to her journalism career. Finally, for additional material related to Sharon's family please see her fonds at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library at the University of Toronto.
Related Material Note: see accessions #2010-3/1 and #2013-7/15 for addtional records donated to the OJA by Sharon Abron Drache.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2010-12-3
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
8 photographs (jpg and tiff) : b&w
Date
1925-2005
Scope and Content
This accession consists of eight digital scans of original photographs belonging to Russian war vet Arkady Novokolsky. The photographs include a portait of Novokolsky in military dress, several photos taken during the Second World War and a family photograph from the 1920s.
Custodial History
The original records were loaned to the Archives for copying as part of the Russian Jewish War Veterans oral history program. They were returned to the donor.
Administrative History
Arkady Novokolsky was born in 1921 in Voznesensk, Ukraine. He was eighteeen years of age when the Second World War began and when he enlisted in the Military Aviation Navigation school in Krasnodar. He was later diagnosed with colour blindness, a condition which marked him as unfit for military service. However, he was later sent to a military technical school in Moscow and graduated with the rank of Lieutenant. He served in West Belarus as part of the Baranovichi Reconnaissance Party, assigned to process and decipher air photography. In 1944, he was sent to study at the Zhukovsky Military Academy and was then sent to Vilnius, Lithuania where he lived for 37 years until immigrating to Canada in 1981.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Soviet Union--Armed Forces
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-8
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-4-8
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
Date
1898-1946
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Frankel family. Included is a letter from Mina Frankel to Ida Frankel, a wedding invitation for the marriage of Ida Frankel and Jacob Levy, two items related to the Frankel Corp. Ltd., and a German poem sent by Leo Frankel to Edmund Scheuer.
Administrative History
Leo Frankel was born in 1864. He married Helena Mayer and had three sons: Egmont Lionel, born in 1891; Carl Milford, born in 1894; and Roy Hecker, born in 1896. Carl Frankel was a prominent member of the Toronto Jewish community and the father of the donor, Nancy Draper. Roy Frankel served in the army during the First World War and later opened Frankel Brothers.
Use Conditions
Not to be used for advertising purposes
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-1-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-1-5
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
1.5 m of textual records
ca 1000 photographs
Date
1900-2000
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the life and career of Morton Shulman as well as the Saxe family. Included in the Shulman records are photographs and slides, correspondence, newsletters, scripts for The Shulman Files, biographical material, writings and speeches, political constituency material, promotional literature for his books, diplomas and certificates, event invitations, scrapbooks and newsclippings. The Saxe family records consist of photographs, event invitations, diplomas and certificates and biographical material.
Custodial History
Records were in the possession of Dianne Saxe, the daughter of Morton Shulman and the wife of Stewart Saxe.
Administrative History
Morton Shulman (1925-2000) was a coroner, an MPP, a physician and an all-around controversial public figure.
Morton Shulman was born in Toronto April 2, 1925, son of David Shulman (?-1947) and Netty Wintrope Schwartz (1898-1985). He was educated at North Toronto Collegiate and received an MD from the University of Toronto in 1948. On 30 May 1950, Shulman married Gloria Bossin, daughter of Isadore and Lena Bossin. They had two children, Dianne and Jeffrey.
Shulman began his career by practising medicine and was first appointed to the Coroner's Office in 1952. He became Chief Coroner for the Municipality of Metropolitan Toronto in 1963. Shulman was elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1967 as the NDP MPP for Toronto's High Park riding and was e-elected in 1971. Publicly he called himself a "socialist millionaire" and authored several books on investment strategies, including Anyone Can Make a Million (1966), The Billion Dollar Windfall (1972), and How to Invest and Profit from Inflation (1979). He also wrote The Coroner (1971) and Member of the Legislature (1973). Shulman also wrote a regular column for the Toronto Sun and hosted a television show call The Shulman Files (1976-1983) on City-TV.
During the 1960s, Shulman's use of the Office of Chief Coroner to lead crusades against the establishment led to his being removed from the position in 1967. A Royal Commission, led by Mr. Justice William Parker, was struck in 1967 to investigate Shulman's allegations that officials in the Attorney-General's Department had suppressed evidence, funds were being wasted, and discrimination influenced appointments of coroners. In 1970, another commission under Mr. Justice Campbell Grant was struck to investigate Shulman's allegations of improper relationships between some employees of the OPP and particular individuals associated with underground criminal activities. Shulman's career as the outspoken Chief Coroner for Metropolitan Toronto was the inspiration for the CBC dramatic television series Wojeck.
After being diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease in the early 1980s, Shulman was successful in establishing a business and charitable trust to speed up Health Canada's approval and import of Deprenyl, a drug used in the treatment of Parkinson's Disease. In recognition of his multi-faceted career and public life of advocacy and generosity, Morton Shulman received the Order of Canada in 1993. He died in Toronto on August 17, 2000. ---------------------------------------------
Stewart Saxe is the son of Percy Saxe and Bernice Cohen and the grandson of Morris Saxe, who was responsible for the founding of the Jewish Farm School in Georgetown. Stewart Saxe is currently a lawyer and is married to Dianne (Shulman) Saxe, an environmental lawyer and the daughter of Morty and Gloria Shulman.
Use Conditions
No publication without donor's approval. Morton Shulman's personal correspondence is closed to researchers. Donor must be contacted prior to viewing.
Name Access
Shulman, Morton, 1925-2000
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-9-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2011-9-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
4 jpgs : b&w and sepia ; 3 MB
Date
[ca. 1910]-1934
Scope and Content
Accession consists of four scanned photographs of original prints documenting the Hurtig family of Thunder Bay. Included is a photo of Mandy Helper with a truck he operated for International Transit Limited, a Hurtig family business (19 January 1934); the Mariaggi Hotel (ca. 1930); Max and Eva Hurtig (nee Gertler) around the time of their marriage in Winnipeg (ca. 1910); and Max Hurtig with his cousin Haber from New York (ca. 1910).
Custodial History
The items were originally scanned for the OJA's Ontario Small Jewish Communities exhibit, however they were never formally accessioned into our holdings. A letter was sent to Sheila Robertson requesting permission to accession the scans in September 2011.
Administrative History
Max Hurtig was born in Roumania and moved to Switzerland in 1903, in order to train to become a watchmaker. He wasn’t happy with the trade or the country and moved to England in order to secure a job and earn funds to travel to Canada. He landed a job on a cattle boat and worked his way across the Atlantic to Montreal, where he worked in a restaurant for a few weeks. He then decided to relocate to Winnipeg in 1904. Shortly thereafter, he located a job at the stone quarries in Tyndall and Garson. After a few months, he bought a team of horses and became a contractor hauling the cut stones. In 1907, he married Eva Gertler, who was from his shtetl, and they lived together in Tyndall. Their two eldest children, Dora (Dot) and Ben, were born there. In 1910, Max was joined by his brothers Dave and Bert and their father Mayer. Their mother Dvora had passed away in 1903.
Max returned to Winnipeg in 1911 with Eva, where he became a partner in Hurtig and Abraim Coal and Wood Company. In 1913, he started M.B. Hurtig Coal, Wood, and Building Supplies. Max also ran a livery business from the family home on Dufferin Avenue, where the stables were located at the back of the property. He became acquainted with the Bronfman brothers, who were engaged in running whisky across to American border. He made a few trips with them, but eventually gave up the work because he found it too risky. Instead, he went to work at the Bronfman-owned Bell Hotel.
In 1914, Max moved to Port Arthur to manage the Mariaggi Hotel, which had been purchased by the Bronfmans. Hurtig soon expanded his business and started a sizeable business empire that included: the Pigeon River Resort Hotel, International Transit Limited (the first bus line to serve that area), the Northland Hotel in Beardmore, the Mariaggi Hotel in Geraldton, the Empire Hotel in Fort William, the Port Arthur Café, and the Cloud Lake Sawmill. His hotels also served as bus depots for his bus line.
Max’s sons Morley and Harry helped manage the bus company which operated local service routes to Kenora, Fort Frances, Pigeon River, Red Lake and Marathon. All of the branches of the Hurtig family established roots in Fort William and Port Arthur, becoming one of the pre-eminent local families. Bert’s son, Larry Hurtig, became a prominent member of the Winnipeg Jewish community, in his capacity as the president of the Jewish Federation of Winnipeg.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-1-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
40 photographs : b&w (jpg)
Date
[192-?]-1959
Scope and Content
Accession consists of scanned photographs documenting George Wharton's early life and family. Included are images of George as an infant, George and his family outside their home in Orillia, and George and his family at various Toronto landmarks, such as High Park and the Toronto Island. Also included is a photograph of George's father and grandfather in London, ON [192-?].
Custodial History
The photographs were in the custody of George Wharton. He loaned them to the OJA for scanning and the originals were returned to him.
Administrative History
George Wharton was born in Toronto at the old Mt. Sinai Hospital on October 18, 1940. He is the oldest of the four children of Thomas and Sarah Wharton. George has two brothers, Michael and Arthur, and one sister, Marion.
George’s mother, Sarah Lipovitch (1913-2006) was born in the Jewish shtetl within Ivansk, Poland. Her family arrived in Canada in the summer of 1914 and settled in London Ontario, where her father eventually established a dry-goods store. Sarah was the youngest of five children, some of which later anglicized their family names to Lipton or Leech. Other than the fact that Sarah’s grandfather owned a bakery in Ivansk, little is known about the prior history of her family.
Thomas Wilbur Wharton (1908-1996) was born in London, Ontario. His Wharton ancestors had a very long and colorful history in England and colonial British America. He was the oldest of the four children of Arthur James Wharton and Lulubelle Wharton (nee Doolittle). His sisters were; Clara, May and Constance (Connie). Born in Canada in 1882, Tom’s father Arthur had joined the army in 1899 and fought in the Boer War within the contingent of Canadians that were part of the British Army in South Africa. After returning to Canada he joined the Royal North-West mounted Police, riding circuit in Northern Alberta. After Arthur’s marriage to Lulu, the couple settled in London where Arthur joined the local police force. Tom and his sisters were born here. At the outbreak of World War One, Arthur rejoined the Canadian Army, fighting in France from 1915 to 1918. Wounded at the 1916 Battle of the Somme, he received several medals and rose to the rank of Sergeant. After the war he returned to police work, eventually becoming Chief Constable in London, Ontario.
Tom’s mother, Lulu, had been born to the Doolittle family. Her father’s family was American, but had anglicized its family name from DeLatalle, which had been used by his Métis ancestors. Lulu’s mother, and maternal grandmother, had come to America as refugees from the Irish potato famine of the mid 19th Century. They were originally from the Flanagan and O’Flaherty families, and probably from Cork.
Thomas and Sarah met in London in the late 1930’s. Contrary to the wishes of both families they married in 1938 (1939?). Shunned by both sets of parents, they moved to Toronto where Tom found war work at A.V.Roe in Malton building wings for WW II Lancaster and Mosquito bombers. Also at this time Tom officially converted to Judaism.
As wartime contracts ended in Toronto, the family moved to the town of Orillia, ON. There Tom built a small bungalow at 70 Olive Crescent on the Southern edge of the town. By 1952 there were four children. By 1954, job opportunities became quite scarce in Orillia and, finding work in Toronto, Tom soon moved the entire family here, where they purchased an older house at 248 Wellesley St. East. In 1961 they moved to a nicer home at 60 Lawrence Ave., West, near Yonge St. in North Toronto.
George’s education took place at Jarvis Collegiate and at the University of Toronto, where he met his future wife Phyllis (1945- ). They were married on October 20, 1965, while both were still at school. For several years George and Phyllis lived in rental apartments, but, in 1981, they purchased their own house at 317 Jedburgh Rd. where they lived for the next 25 years.
George’s first permanent job was at the CBC Program (radio) Archives. Here George worked from 1967 to 1975, beginning what was to be a life-long career dealing with historical documentation and specializing in audio-visual records. From 1976 to 1986 he was employed by the National Archives (now L.A.C.) with responsibility for various A/V collections then held at the Toronto Federal Records Centre in Rexdale. During 1987 and 1988 George was employed at the Archives of Ontario on a series of contracts, but in February, 1989 he was hired by the newly-created Metropolitan Toronto Archives, which opened its new facility at 255 Spadina Road in June of 1991. After the 1989 amalgamation of all Toronto municipalities, the facility was renamed City of Toronto Archives. George continued his career here until October, 2005, when he reached the then-mandatory retirement age of 65. In 2006 he was hired as a part-time contract employee of the Ontario Jewish Archives where he designed and implemented several large back-log-reduction projects where much of the processing was accomplished by the OJA’s volunteers.
George and Phyllis had two sons; Charles Jacob was born in 1973, Avrom David was born in 1979. Oldest son Charles married Rixi Abrahamson in December, 2004. Grandchildren from this marriage are: Noah Alexander Wharton (born Dec.7, 2006) and Madelaine Abigail Faye Wharton (born Jan. 15 2012).
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-3-6
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
281 photographs : b&w ; 12 x 16 cm or smaller
Date
[192-]-[198-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 281 photographs in one album of the Quitt and Drutz families of Toronto. The photographs are family snapshots documenting life events such as births, marriages, family vacations and military service and other social gatherings.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Mark Drutz until they were donated to the OJA on 4 April 2012.
Administrative History
Mark Drutz is the youngest child of Harold (Hymie) and Evelyn Sandra (Quitt) Drutz. Harold (1913-1998) was born to Phillip (Fyvish) and Annie Drutz of Russia. In 1946 he married Evelyn Quitt (1924-1999), the daughter of Samuel (1891-?) and Bertha (1890-1953) Quitt, also of Russia. They had two children: Paul, who ultimately succumbed to AIDS (1947-1994) and Mark (aka Donald, 1951-). Evelyn and Harold also helped to raise Paul's son and their grandson, Ezra Matthew (1975-).
Harold worked in the garment trade as a pattern cutter and also served in the Canadian Medical Corps during the Second World War. He was one of 7 children, his siblings being: Meyer, Daniel, Harry (Drue), David, Pauline and Mollie (Simmons). Evelyn was one of 5 chidren, her siblings being: Estelle (Drue - married Harold's brother Harry), Rivka (Smolkin), Gordon (Gerhson), and Beverley (Brown).
Descriptive Notes
Finding aid is located with the photographs along with genealogical information prepared by the donor.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-4-2
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
30 cm of textual records and other material
Date
[190-]-1994
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the literary and military careers of Leo Heaps, as well as a small selection of family photographs and textual records. Included are various manuscripts and other writings, newsclippings and documents related to Heaps' role as a British paratrooper and his subsequent awarding of the Royal Military Cross. The photographs document the Heaps family, as well as the underground resistance movement in Arnhem, of which he was a part.
The videocassette documents a family trip to Arnhem in 1994 to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Arnhem.
Photo Caption (035): Seargent Alan Kettley of the Glider Pilot Regiment, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (038): Gilbert Sadi-Kirschen known, head of the Special Air Service mission to Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Photo Caption (046): Major Tony Hibbot (left) about to take off for Arnhem, [194-?]. Ontario Jewish Archives, Blankenstein Family Heritage Centre, accession 2012-4-2. Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Adrian Heaps, son of Leo Heaps.
Administrative History
Leo Heaps (1923-1995) was born in Winnipeg in 1923, the son of A. A. Heaps and Bessie Morris. His father A. A. was a founder of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, the forerunner of the New Democratic Party. Leo Heaps was raised in Winnipeg and received an education at Queen's University, the University of California, and McGill University. During the Second World War, at the age of 21, Heaps was seconded to the British Army and found himself commanding the 1st Battalion's Transport. He participated in the Battle of Arnhem as a paratrooper.
Leo Heaps was awarded the Royal Military Cross for his work with the Dutch Resistance. His brother, David, had also achieved the same distinction, thereby making them the only Jewish brothers during the Second World War to win the decoration. After the war, Heaps went to Israel and aided their army in the establishment of mobile striking units. Whilst there, he met his wife-to-be, Tamar (1927-). Together they had one son, Adrian, and three daughters, Karen, Gillian, and Wendy.
During the Hungarian Revolution he led a special rescue team to bring refugees out and across the border. In the mid-1960s he returned to Britain where he dabbled in various entrepreneurial projects as well as writing several books, notably "The Grey Goose of Arnhem", telling his own story of Arnhem, the aftermath of the battle, and also the stories of other Arnhem evaders and their dealings with the Resistance.
Leo Heaps spent most of his life in Toronto, Canada, and was amongst the forty Canadian veterans who returned to Arnhem in 1994 to mark the 50th anniversary. He died in 1995.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Publication credit line must read: Courtesy of the Heaps Family.
Descriptive Notes
Physical Description note: Includes ca. 100 photographs; 1 videocassette (ca. 32 min) : col, sd. ; VHS, and 1 presentation piece : 52 x 49 cm.
Subjects
World War, 1939-1945
Name Access
Heaps, Leo, 1923-1995
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
119 photographs : b&w and col. ; 18 x 13 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1929]-2001
Scope and Content
Accession consists of 119 photograhs documenting the Drutz and Quitt families of Toronto. The photographs are snapshots documenting the family members and events.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Mark Drutz. They were mailed to the Archives in April of 2012.
Administrative History
Mark Drutz is the youngest child of Harold (Hymie) and Evelyn Sandra (Quitt) Drutz. Harold (1913-1998) was born to Phillip (Fyvish) and Annie Drutz of Russia. In 1946 he married Evelyn Quitt (1924-1999), the daughter of Samuel (1891-?) and Bertha (1890-1953) Quitt, also of Russia. They had two children: Paul, who ultimately succumbed to AIDS (1947-1994) and Mark (aka Donald, 1951-). Evelyn and Harold also helped to raise Paul's son and their grandchild, Ezra Matthew (1975-). Harold worked in the garment trade as a pattern cutter and also served in the Canadian Medical Corps during the Second World War. He was one of 7 children, his siblings being: Meyer, Daniel, Harry (Drue), David, Pauline and Mollie (Simmons). Evelyn was one of 5 chidren, her siblings being: Estelle (Drue - married Harold's brother Harry), Rivka (Smolkin), Gordon (Gerhson), and Beverley (Brown).
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-10
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-5-10
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w ; 19 x 67 cm
Date
28 Mar. 1929
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Sunnyside Lodge No. 449, Degree Team Winners and Chapions of the Degree Work. The photo depicts a group of members of the lodge seated and standing in front of an unidentified building in Toronto.
Administrative History
The Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Sunnyside Lodge No. 449 was an all-Jewish lodge of the organizaiton. They were a benevolent and fraternal association.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-6-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-6-7
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
58 photographs : b&w and col. ; 21 x 25 cm or smaller
Date
[190-]-2003
Scope and Content
Accession consists of original and photocopies of photographs related to the Lyons, Agranove, Rotenberg, Pollock families from Toronto and Hamilton. Included are family portraits, wedding portraits, the family likely at community events, and a photo of the family at Crystal Beach. There is also a photocopy of a story in the Canadian Jewish News about a Rotenberg family reunion in 2003.
Administrative History
William Agranove was active in Keiltzer Society and was in the furniture manufacturing business. He was also a major fundraiser for the UJA, a close friend of Sam Kronick. He is mentioned in Hesh Troper's book "None is Too Many" as helping Jews come to Toronto from Europe.
Rotenberg Family were a large family with 10 children. Saul Rotenberg raised horses and was partners with Lyons in the furniture business that had many locations, one on Yonge Street.
Descriptive Notes
Donor's cousin Judy will be in touch with OJA to provide more information.
Subjects
Families
Places
Hamilton (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-6-4
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
24 photographs : b&w and col ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
[ca. 1915]-1986
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs related to Nachman Sokol's involvement with the Mizrachi movement. The photographs feature Sokol at meetings and events in Israel with individuals such as President Chaim Herzog, former President Zalman Shazar, Chief Ashkenazi Rabbi Goren, and the Mayor of Jerusalem, Shlomo Zalman Shragai. Photos related to the Mizrachi movement include a group photo featuring Sokol with Shmuel Aaron Abella, Mr. Posner and Max and Joseph Zeifman along with a snapshot taken at Camp Moshava (or Camp Hashomer Hadati / Mizrachi Agricultural School and Camp) in Bronte (this camp likely opened in 1945 on the Osler Estate in Bronte). Personal photographs include Sokol disembarking from a plane in Israel, Sokol with his wife Bertha, as well as his brother-in-law, Hyman Bessin and Sokol as a young child with his parents and siblings..The textual records include a 100th anniversary book for the Canadian Friends of Yeshiva University, a 70th anniversary book for Sokol, some correspondence including a letter to Hy Bessin from Paul Martin Sr. and a reception invitation to Sokol from the President of Israel.
Custodial History
The records were in the possession of Reuben Sokol, the step-son of Nachman Sokol.
Administrative History
Nachman (Nathan) Sokol (ca. 1910-1992) was born around 1910 in Brisk, Russia. He was ordained at the Brisk Yeshiva, following in the footsteps of his father, Rabbi Yakov Menachem Sokol. His mother's name was Gittel. He had five siblings: Shmuel, Mindel (died in the Holocaust), Harry, Chana and Adele. In 1947, he attended the World Zionist Conference in Basle and met Rachel Bessin Hochman (the first President of the Women's Mizrachi Hapoel Hamizrachi of Canada). He later met Rachel's daughter Bertha Bessin (b. Ottawa 1920-d. Toronto 2011). In 1958 Nachman and Bertha married; the second marriage for both. Nachman's first wife was Dina and they had one daughter, Gloria (Halberstadt). Bertha had three children with her first husband Joseph Lang (who died at age 37): Merna (Davidowtiz), Marvin, and Reuben. Bertha's children were legally adopted by Nachman.
Nachman never practiced as a Rabbi, although he was trained as a ritual slaughterer. He would work in property management for most of his life. He was very involved in the religious zionist movement in Toronto, particularly as a member of the Mizrachi movement. He was a volunteer on the Va'ad Hakashruth, on the board of CHAT, President of the Torah HaVodah Congregation, co-founder of the Bnei Akiva high schools in Toronto, a counselor and Rosh Mosh of Camp Moshava in Bronte, and founder and President of Camp Moshava in Ennismore, Ontario. Sokol died in 1992.
Use Conditions
Copyright may not be held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Associated material note: the Ottawa Jewish Archives holds material related to Camp Moshova in Bronte in the Mizrachi Organization of Canada; Ottawa Branch fonds.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-8-1
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 18 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1884-1985
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records documenting the Coppel and Cooper families of Galt (now Cambridge) and Toronto respectively. Coppel family records include family correspondence, photocopies of Moses Kappel's discharge papers from the Austro-Hungarian military (1884), B'nai Israel Synagogue sisterhood meeting minutes, financial records, photographs, Hadassah booklets and programmes, and a photo album documenting the closing of B'nai Israel Synagogue in 1985. Also included are records relating to Elizabeth Cooper (née Coppel)'s involvement in Canadian Young Judaea and her work as a camp counselor at a Jewish day camp near Kitchener-Waterloo (Judaean Day Camp/Camp Ruach). These records include correspondence, publications, activity schedules, lists of camp counselors, and a Young Judaean scarf. Coppel family records also include marriage and burial records of Aaron Coppel, audio cassettes of an oral history interview conducted with Cy Coppel in 1976, and military records documenting Max David Simonoff's service in the Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Finally, included is a Farband Shule (Folks School) program book (1927) and class photo (ca. 1931). Identified in the photograph is Ethel Raicus (first row, third from the right).
Cooper family records include digital photographs of Sam Cooper and the weightlifting club at the YMHA in Toronto (1930s), portraits of Jacob Cooper (Cooperberg), a school photo of Sam and Max Cooper, and a photo of Hilda Cooper.
Finally accession consists of program books for various events, including a Canadian Jewish Congress song book, an Israel Dance Theatre at the Royal Alexandra, and a Queen Esther Purim play.
Administrative History
Aaron Selig (Archie Aaron) Coppel (Kappel / Koppel / Cappell / Kappele) was born to Moses Kappel and Perl (nee Pistenfeld) in Galicia in 1882. He came to Canada in 1903 and lived with a landsmen family, the Siegels. Mr. Siegel was a horse dealer who took Aaron under his wing and taught him the horse trade. Aaron married Mr. Siegel's daughter, Chaya Geitel (Gertrude) Seigel, in 1905. Aaron and Geitel had seven children: Helen, Rose, Newt, Cyrus ("Cy," born in 1911), Les, George, and Harry. After marrying, Aaron and Geitel remained in Galt, and Aaron continued dealing in livestock. Although he was eager to assimilate into Canadian society (he gave his children British names and spoke with no accent), the family kept kosher and Aaron hired itinerant Hebrew teachers for the children.
Cyrus Coppel married Channa "Anna" Simonoff on 25 August1946. Anna was born in Russia to Avraham Dov and Chashe Bryna Tzaitzeck. Anna had three siblings: Sarah Merle, Faigle (died en route to Canada), and Mordecai Doved. She immigrated to Ottawa in 1914 with her family. An uncle already living in Ottawa had changed his last name to Simonoff and the family decided to change their name to Simonoff as well. Avraham worked as a tailor in Russia and likely continued in this profession in Canada. The family moved to Toronto sometime after 1919 and was actively involved in the Labour Zionist movement. Anna was in the milliner's union and two of her aunts, Slaava Raicus and Esther Cohen, were members of Club One (Pioneer Women). Anna and Cyrus had two children together: Bryna (24 February 1949-12 January 2006) and Elizabeth (b. 16 Dec. 1950). Cyrus initially worked as a mechanic, but later worked in the office of an auto shop and traded in auto parts. He also traded in livestock as a hobby. Cyrus was one of the founders of the B'nai Israel Synagogue in Galt. Initially, synagogue services were held in the homes of local residents, such as the Spring family; however, a building was finally purchased in 1946. After the synagogue closed, the Torahs and plaques went to the synagogue in Kitchener. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Jacob Cooperberg (Kupferberg, Cooper) came to Canada around 1910 from Kielce, Poland. His wife and children (Max, Sam, and Aidel or Ida) remained in Poland, waiting for Jacob to earn enough money for them to come to Canada as well. His family was unable to join him until after the First World War had ended, arriving in 1920. Jacob and Sarah had three more children in Canada: Irving, Joey, and Hilda. Jacob worked as a peddler in Toronto and later opened a scrap yard, Cooper Iron and Medal. The family lived on Oxford Street in the Kensington Market area.
Sam Cooper married Kay Gernstein in 1948. They had two children together: Neil and Donna (married name is Speigel). Sam initially worked as a tailor, but later worked as a scrap dealer. Neil married Donna Coppel and also works in the scrap trade. Donna is a librarian.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 1 photo album, 7 photographs (tiff), 3 photographs, 2 audio cassettes, and 1 scarf.
Subjects
Families
Places
Galt (Cambridge, Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-4
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph : col. ; 26 x 21 cm
Date
[between 1925 and 1935]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a photograph of a poster advertising the showing of the movie "Yiskor" or "Thou Shalt Remember" at the Standard Theatre. This film was released in 1925 and manufactured by S. Geyer Inc. in New York.
Subjects
Theatrical posters, Yiddish
Name Access
Standard Theatre
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-13
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-13
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records
11 photographs : b&w and col. (2 negatives) ; 21 x 26 cm or smaller
Date
1917-1956
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to Aaron Ladovsky. Included is an urgent memo from Kielce asking for relief money and the accompanying receipt from Anshel Wise's steamship agent office for the remittance of the requested money (1939), a letter to Ladovsky c/o of the United Jewish Relief Conference from the CJC (1944), a Kieltzer Sick Benefit Society of Toronto dues booklet (1917), a Kieltzer Landmanshaften in Israel pamphlet (1953), and a receipt from the Standard Theatres Ltd. for payment of $60 for Ladovsky. This payment was made two months after the theatre first opened in 1921 and was likely payment for seats. The photographs depict Aaron Ladovsky with family in Kielce (1928), the dedication of a monument to the Kielce martyrs at a Jewish cemetery in Paris (between 1945 and 1950), a negative of a Canadian Jewish Congress meeting (1943), the exhumation of Kielce Jews who were murdered in the Holocaust, a photo of Ruthie, Herman and Philip Ladovsky at United Bakers, (1990s), and an exterior view of United Bakers on Spadina Avenue (1956).
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 photograph : b&w (tiff)
Date
[192-]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of one photograph of the exterior of Sam Lichtman's news store. The photograph was taken soon after the store first opened. Identified in the photograph is Sam Lichtman (right). The other man in the photograph may be Toronto's mayor at the time.
Custodial History
The original photograph is in the custody of Sam's daughter, Maxine Cadsby, who has it stored in an antique frame. The scan was taken through the frame.
Administrative History
Sam Lichtman was born in 1888 in Galicia. He immigrated to Canada on his own in 1901 with 25 cents in his pocket. He started out as a newsboy selling daily papers and comic papers in Toronto. He later opened his own news store, Lichtman's, and became a newspaper distributor. Around 1918, he married Fanny (nee Shapero) and they had four daughters together: Grace Hillman, Marjorie Rosenfield, Eileen Hertzman, and Maxine Cadsby. Sam passed away in 1958.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Name Access
Lichtman, Sam, 1888-1958
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-11-5
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 20 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
[190-?]-1963
Scope and Content
Accession consists of graphic and textual material documenting Mark Hazza and his family. Included are family and individual portraits, unidentified school and sports team photographs, and a Rocky Mountain Polo Ranch greeting card. Of note are promotional sight-seeing photographs for Toronto and a photograph of Bob Hope at a Paramount Theatre event in Toronto. Also included are obituaries and other genealogical information that was collected by Nessa Herman.
Identified in the photographs are: Mark Hazza, Mary Hazza, Phillip Hazza, John Hazza, Reuben Hazza, Racheal (nee Hazza) Harris, David Cainer, Sadie (nee Hazza) Cainer, Isadore Harris, Annie (nee Hazza) Cohen, Sam Cohen, Evelyn Cohen, Shirley Harris, Hershel Harris, Sidney Cohen, Ruth Cohen, and Theresa Harris.
Custodial History
Nessa Herman collected the material from various family members and donated it to the OJA.
Administrative History
Mark Hazza was one of the earliest Jewish immigrants to settle in Toronto. He was born in Russian Poland in 1845. To escape the draft he was smuggled into Holland and later went to England in 1866. He finally settled in Toronto around 1871. Soon after arriving in Toronto, Miriam (Marion or Mary) Barnett from Bristol, England joined him here and they were married in the small hall where Holy Blossom Synagogue's services were being conducted at the time. They settled in Yorkville and Mark ran a tailoring business in what was the north end of the city.
Mark and Miriam had six children together: Racheal (Rae), Annie, Phillip, John (Hyman or Imy), Reuben (Rubin or Bun), and Sadie. Reuben went to to become a sports trainer, Phillip worked in the film business as a general manager for Famous Players, and John opened the Rocky Mountain Polo Pony Ranch in Alberta and was the first manager of Capitol Theatre in Calgary.
Mark passed away in 1918.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2012-10-9
Material Format
multiple media
Physical Description
ca. 12 cm of textual records and other material
Date
1917-[ca. 2000]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of material documenting the Edell family, Rabbi Weinreb, Paul Edell's printing company, the She'arim Hebrew Day School, and the Edell family's involvement with the Mackziki Hadas Congregation. Accession also includes records documenting Rabbi Kelman's involvement with the Beth Emeth Bais Yehuda synagogue. Records include photographs of family gatherings and family members participating in a Balfour Declaration march in 1917, correspondence, flyers, invitations, and genealogical information and family reminiscences collected by Sara Kelman. Also included are two printing blocks from Paul Edell's printing company and one stamp used by Rabbi Weinreb. Of note, is a flyer and correspondence documenting the Husiatyner Klaus Beth Israel synagogue and its closure. The bulk of the material is in English, but a small amount is in Yiddish or Hebrew.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Descriptive Notes
Includes 9 photographs (tiff), 2 photographs, 1 stamp, and 2 printing blocks.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-2-3
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-2-3
Material Format
textual record
graphic material
Physical Description
20 cm of textual records
ca. 100 photographs
Date
[190-]-2012
Scope and Content
Accession consists of records related to three generations of the Ladovsky family and their restaurant, the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant. Also included is a small amount of material related to Jewish organizations in Toronto, such as the Kieltzer Society and B'nai Brith, as well as the Bakery and Confectionary Union. Records include family and business photographs, correspondence, newsclippings, UB menus and other ephemera, and records related to family simchas and celebrations.
Custodial History
The records were created and accumulated by Aaron Ladovsky, Herman Ladovsky and Ruthie Ladovsky.
Administrative History
Aaron Ladovsky was born in 1888 in Kielce, Poland. He immigrated with his wife Sarah to Toronto in 1906 at the age of 18. Soon after arriving, Aaron Ladovsky worked to help form a Jewish bakers’ union to advocate for collective rights among Jewish Bakers. In 1912 he opened the United Bakers Dairy Restaurant at Dundas and Bay Streets (known then as Agnes and Terauley Streets respectively) in the heart of the Ward. That same year, the couple had twin sons Herman and Samuel, who were born on September 23, 1912.
Only a short time later, in 1920, Aaron moved the location of his restaurant to 338 Spadina Avenue, just north of Dundas. He and his family lived in an apartment upstairs. Herman and Samuel attended Hester How Elementary School until 1919, Lord Lansdowne Public School once the family moved to Spadina, and later Central Commerce. The twins worked in the family business in the 1920s delivering fresh breads and buns by horse cart.
Aaron Ladovsky was involved in a number of community organizations. He was instrumental in founding the Kieltzer Society of Toronto in 1913; a community based immigrant-aid association extending aid to Kielcers in Poland and around the world. Ladovsky remained an active member of the organization until his death on April 5, 1960 . His restaurant provided a welcome gathering place for the Jewish community, serving traditional dishes and maintaining a friendly open-door policy. Aaron Ladovsky was known for his generosity and claimed that no one, whether they had money or not, left his restaurant hungry. The United Bakers' menu was mainly based on Sarah’s original recipes, and continues to be so to this day.
During the Second World War, Herman served overseas as an electrician in the Canadian army show with comics Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster. After returning from the war, he married Dora Macklin in 1947, a registered nurse from Regina. He also began to take over management of the family business. Later, his son Philip and daughter Ruth would follow in his footsteps, helping to run the restaurant with him and later taking over managment. United Bakers remained on Spadina Avenue for 66 years – until 1986 when it moved to its current location at 506 Lawrence Avenue West, off of Bathurst Street. Herman was an active fixture in restaurant until his death on January 6, 2002. He also supported and was involved in the work of the Ontario Jewish Archives over the years. Today, Philip and Ruth carry on the family tradition of running United Bakers Dairy Restaurant.
Descriptive Notes
To be integrated into the Ladovsky family fonds 83.
Subjects
Families
Restaurants
Name Access
Ladovsky, Herman
Ladovsky, Aaron
United Bakers Dairy Restaurant (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-3-1
Material Format
graphic material
textual record
Physical Description
ca. 55 photographs
1 folder of textual records
Date
1919-1939, [ca. 2005]
Scope and Content
Accession consists primarily of photographs documenting the early life of Bella Wilder (née Goldbach) and her family in Poland. Included are images of Bella with her siblings and friends, group photos of Bella at her Jewish school in Poland, a group image of Victor in the Polish army, and other photographs of Bella's family and friends. Also included are two family histories documenting the story of Bella's mother, Shifra Frimeth Goldbach, and the story of Max and Bella Wilder, which was written by their granddaughter Sandee Sharpe. Of particular note is a 1925 school photograph of the Workers Evening School in Opatow (?), which has Yiddish writing suggesting that the school may have received aid from an organization referred to as "Gives Relief" in Toronto.
Custodial History
The records were originally donated to the Jewish Genealogical Society of Canada (Toronto section) by Bella's daughter Ann Sharpe. JGS Toronto donated the material to the OJA a few months later with her consent.
Administrative History
Bella (nee Goldbach) Wilder was born on May 12, 1910 in Opatow, Poland to Chaim Shlomo Goldbach and Shifra Frimeth Schatz Goldbach. Bella's older brothers, Victor, Jack and Hymie began immigrating to Toronto in the 1920s and had saved enough money by 1936 to bring Bella and her mother to Toronto. After arriving in Toronto Bella found work sewing in a factory.
Bella married Max Wilder on September 29, 1939. Max worked at Superior Men's Tailoring where he sewed zippers into men's pants. They had two children together: Ann (born 5 April 1940, married Norman Sharpe) and Stan (born 21 Jan. 1945, died June 1974). Max passed away in 1999 and Bella passed away in 2002.
Subjects
Immigrants--Canada
Families
Name Access
Goldbach, Shifra
Sharpe, Ann
Wilder, Bella, 1910-2002
Wilder, Max, ?-1999
Places
Poland
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-1
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-1
Material Format
graphic material
Physical Description
1 photograph (tiff) : b&w
1 photograph : col. ; 8 x 8 cm
Date
[ca. 1927], 1960
Scope and Content
Accession consists of a school photograph of Jack Price at the McCaul Street school (front row, third from the right), and a photograph of the first group of Baycrest volunteers at an outing (Sunny Price is in the front row, far right).
Custodial History
The Baycrest photograph was originally in the possession of Shirley Banks and she gave the photo to Sunny Price in 1982. It later came into the possession of Sunny's son David.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-4
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
13 photographs : b&w (11 tif, 2 jpg)
Date
1909-[ca. 1952]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs documenting the Gryfe, Silverman, Saul and Greenberg families. The majority of the images are family portraits, however, also included is a school photograph of Sandy Greenberg at Charles G. Fraser School in Toronto, a photograph of Feda and Izzy Greenberg in Ottawa, a photograph of the Silverman family at Crystal Beach, and a photograph of a family celebration for Morris Silverman's birthday. Also identified in the photographs are: Sam Silverman, Bill Gryfe, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, Lizzie Gryfe, Bayla Gryfe, Fae Silverman, Tillie Silverman, Sam Silverman, Bertha Silverman, Sam Saul, Joseph Saul, Ida Saul, Anna Saul, Rachel Saul, Nancy Silverman, Ruth Silverman, Lou Weitzman, and Ruth Weitzman.
Administrative History
Izzy Greenberg and Anna (nee Nathan) Greenberg immigrated to Ottawa from Romania around 1910. They had six children together: Freda, Harry, Joe, Anne, Helen, and Earl (b. 1920). Izzy likely worked as a peddler. When Anna passed away in 1923 all of the children, except for Freda, were sent to a Jewish orphanage in Montreal (the Montefiore orphanage). The orphanage closed in 1936 when Earl was 16 years old. He came to Toronto where he met Sandy (or Sylvia) Silverman. They were married in 1947. Earl initially worked as a shoe salesman, but later opened his own business, Sanmarcoda, where he bought and sold electronic surplus. He and Sandy had three children together: Marsha, Corey, and David. Sandy worked as a secretary with the provincial government and sold baby's clothing at flea markets on Sundays.
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Morris Silverman, Esther (Gryfe) Silverman, and their two daughters Fae and Tillie immigrated to Hamilton from Romania in 1907. Esther's sister, Lizzie Gryfe, was already living in Hamilton at the time. In 1909, Morris and Esther had another son together, Sam. By 1922, the family had moved to Nassau Street in Toronto where Morris worked as a tailor for Tip Top Tailors. They lived next door to the Saul Family. Sam married Rae Saul in 1927. Sam had had various jobs throughout his life including, cab driver, venetian blind salesman, and driver for a cleaner's.
Subjects
Families
Portraits
Name Access
Greenberg, Sandy
Places
Crystal Beach (Fort Erie, Ont.)
Ottawa (Ont.)
Toronto (Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-6-5
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
2 photographs : b&w (tiff)
Date
1920-1926
Scope and Content
Accession consists of photographs of Rae Saul and her relatives outside the Saul family homes on Elizabeth or Venaly Street and Nassau Street. Identified are Millie Aaron, Anna Saul, and Sam Saul.
Administrative History
Joseph and Anna Saul came to Canada from Romania in the early 1900s. They had six children together: Sam (b. 1908), Rachel (Rae, b. 1910), Ida, Jeanette, Bonnie, and Dorothy. Joseph abandoned the family around 1923 and travelled to California to become an actor. Although his family never heard from him again, they later recognized him in movies under the name Maurice Samuels. Anna was deaf and mute and worked as a seamstress, making ladies clothing out of her own home. Rae obtained work in a hat factory when she was 13 years old and continued in this trade throughout the remainder of her life. Around 1950 she opened her own hat store at Eglinton and Dufferin called Rae's Hats. She briefly lived above the store with her husband, Sam Silverman.
Use Conditions
Copyright is in the public domain and permission for use is not required. Please credit the Ontario Jewish Archives as the source of the photograph.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Aaron, Millie
Saul, Anna
Saul, Sam
Silverman, Rae
Places
Elizabeth Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Nassau Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-7-7
Material Format
textual record
Physical Description
7 cm of textual records
Date
1923-2012, predominant 1923-1945
Scope and Content
Accession consists of textual records documenting Paula Epstein's family, particularly her parents Benjamin Gorman and Lillie Goldstein. Included are passports, Ben Gorman's high school transcripts, Ben and Lillie's marriage certificate (ketuba), Lillie's high school graduation program (1931, Central High School of Commerce), and records related to Ben's company, Gorman Knitting Mills Limited, including sock patterns. Also included are letters that were sent to Ben and Lillie before and during the Second World War from Ben's parents, brother (Jack) and cousins (the Stencil family) who were living in Poland. Finally accession includes one family memoir written by Paula's husband, Stanley Epstein. This memoir predominantly traces the history of the Epstein family (Nova Scotia), but also includes information about the Goldstein family (Toronto) and Gorman family (Toronto).
Administrative History
Benjamin Gorman was born in Rypin, Poland on 12 Oct. 1909 to Shmuel Pesach and Michla Gorman (nee Stencil). He came to Canada in 1928 after finishing high school matriculation in Poland. He was the first person in his town to ever pass the matriculation exam held in Warsaw. In Toronto, he married Lillian (Lillie) Goldstein on 1 Sept. 1939. They had three children together: Paula, Samuel, and Alvin. In 1953, Ben founded and operated a sock manufacturing company called Gorman Knitting Mills Limited. It's original location was 955 Eastern Avenue, but it re-located in 1963 to 1360 Birchmount Road in Scarborough.
Lillie Goldstein was born in Toronto on 10 Feb. 1914 to Harry and Rachel Goldstein. She was a medical secretary for many years and later worked in the family business as a bookkeeper. She was a member of the Karen Or Group where money was raised for muscular dystrophy with an annual card night that was held at the community centre at Eglinton Park.
Descriptive Notes
Language note: English, Yiddish, Hebrew, and Polish.
Subjects
Families
Name Access
Gorman, Benjamin
Gorman, Lillie
Epstein, Paula
Epstein, Stanley
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-9-7
Material Format
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
5 photographs
Date
1920-1977
Scope and Content
5 electronic copies of black and white photographs relted to Wellts Deli: 1) Peter and Fannie Wellts 2) Peter Wellts with cleaver in hand in the deli. 3) Exterior of Wellts Deli (1959) taken by realtor when it closed. 4-5) exterior of Wellt's Deli taken in 1977 before building was being torn down. The word "Kosher" in Yiddish/Hebrew is still visible.
Administrative History
Wellts Delicatessen was founded by Peter and Fannie Wellts in the 1910s at 350 College Street. Peter Wellts was born in Tarnigrad, Poland in 1888 and Fannie Brown was born in New York City in 1889. They met in New York and moved with Fannie’s family to Toronto in 1910. Peter worked in the garment district prior at the start of the restaurant business. Fannie’s father David Brown had come earlier from New York to work for Eaton’s in the men’s clothing business. The rest of the Brown family, Fannie’s parents and siblings eventually returned to New York. Peter and Fannie married in Toronto on November 26, 1910. They had two daughters Sylvia (b. August 26, 1911) (m. Walfish) and Ethel (b. January 7, 1928) (m. Rochwerg). They lived in an apartment above the delicatessen. When Ethel married her husband Nathan Rochwerg in 1948, they moved in with Fannie and Peter above the deli. Ethel and Nathan had three children Martin, Arlene (m. Kochberg), and Sidney. When Peter was in his 70s, it was decided that the family would move north into the Bathurst Manor and close the deli. Peter had a heart attack on December 26, 1959, before the move, and Fannie moved in with Nathan and Ethel and their three children. The deli closed in 1959. The deli was known for 5 cent pastrami/corned beef sandwiches sold during the depression. Peter Wellts never let anyone go hungry during this period. They had Vernor's ginger ale on tap during a time when everything was in bottles. Deliveries would come in through the backyard by the garage. It was kosher. Ethel remembers people coming in to use the phone in the kitchen or the washroom in the basement.
Use Conditions
Copyright is held by the Ontario Jewish Archives. Please contact the Archives to obtain permission prior to use.
Descriptive Notes
Related material note: an article on the deli from one of the local daily newspapers from 1969 is in a vertical file on Wellt's Deli
Subjects
Delicatessens
Places
College Street (Toronto, Ont.)
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-6
Source
Archival Accessions
Accession Number
2013-8-6
Material Format
textual record (electronic)
graphic material (electronic)
Physical Description
1 folder of textual records and graphic material : b&w and sepia (tiff and jpg) ; 780 MB
Date
1915-[ca. 1955]
Scope and Content
Accession consists of electronic copies of original records documenting the Zack and Levy families from Hamilton and Toronto. Records included family photographs, a border crossing identification card, a military identity document and a war service badge certificate, Irving Levy's intern registration card for Barnert Memorial Hospital, a graduation diploma and a sworn declaration regarding Irving Levy's name.
Administrative History
Isaac (d. 1955) Zack and Rose (d. ca 1965) Chertkoff were both born in Russia and came separately to Canada in the early 1900s. They married in Toronto in 1907 and then moved to Hamilton. Together, they had five children: Hy (b. ca. 1909); Betty (Joseph) (b. ca. 1911); Sadie (Levy) (1913-2013); Mannie (b. ca. 1915); and Gordie (b. ca. 1922). Isaac and Rose ran "Zack's Furniture" store on York Street in Hamilton. They were ardent Labour Socialists.
Nathan (d. 1965) Levy and Annie (d. 1975) Persofsky both came spearately to Toronto with their families. They married in Toronto sometime before 1908 and had seven children: Frances (Hendricks) (b. ca. 1908); Morris; Mary (Rubin); Irving (1916-ca. 1998); Godie (Nass); Larry (b. ca. 1924); and Jackie. Nathan was a barber.
Nathan's son Irving studied medicine at the University of Toronto. Following graduation in 1941, Irving went to the United States and interned for one year at the Barnert Memorial Hospital in Patterson, New Jersey. Following his internship, Irving returned to Canada and married Sadie Zack sometime after February 1943. The two had met at a National Council of Jewish Women's party in Hamilton. Irving enlisted in the Royal Canadan Army Medical Corps in February of 1943 and served on active duty until 1946. He attained the rank of Captain and served in Italy as a physician. Upon returning to Canada, Irving opened his own medical practice in Hamilton. Together, Irving and Sadie had three children: Marsha (Slavens) (b. 1947); Richard (b. 1949); and Ira (b. 1952). Irving and Sadie were active memebers of the Hamilton Jewish community, Sadie being a long-time member of the National Council of Jewish Women and the Temple Ahshe Shalom Sisterhood and Irving a member of B'nai Brith. Irving died ca. 1998 and Sadie died in 2013 in Hamilton.
Name Access
Slavens, Marsha, 1947- (subject)
Levy, Irving, 1916-1998 (subject)
Levy, Sadie, 1913-2013 (creator)
Zack, Isaac, -1955 (subject)
Zack, Rose, -1965 (subject)
Source
Archival Accessions
2099 records – page 1 of 42.

Narrow By

Collection Name

Source

Format

Date

Description Level

Subject

Name

Place

Language

Restrictions

Available Digital Content